NAPNAP Daily News - NAPNAP

NAPNAP Daily News

Families Of Very Low-Birth-Weight Premature Infants More Likely To Use Mental Healthcare In The First Year Following NICU Discharge, Study Finds

Healio (4/11, Weldon) reports, “Parents of very low-birth-weight premature infants are more likely to use mental health care in the first year after discharge from the NICU than families who do not have a premature infant, according to a study” published in Pediatrics. Additionally, mental healthcare “use was even higher among parents of the 11.1% of neonates who died.”

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FDA Expands Approval Of Benralizumab To Include Treatment Of Younger Children With Uncontrolled Severe Asthma With An Eosinophilic Phenotype

MedPage Today (4/11, Short) reports, “The FDA expanded the approval of benralizumab (Fasenra) to include treatment of younger kids with uncontrolled severe asthma with an eosinophilic phenotype, AstraZeneca announced.” MedPage Today adds, “Previously approved for individuals 12 and up, the broader indication now allows for use of the injectable add-on maintenance therapy in patients ages 6 to 11 years as well.” Healio (4/11, Langowska) also covers the story.

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Disposable E-Cigarette Devices Promote More Persistent Vaping Among AYAs, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (4/11, Goldberg) reports, “Disposable e-cigarette devices promote more persistent vaping among adolescents and young adults (AYAs), thus increasing potential health risks, according to study findings.” Researchers came to this conclusion after conducting “a prospective longitudinal study during 2021 and 2022 in Southern California, surveying adolescents (14-17 years of age) and young adults (21-24 years of age) who had vaped within 30 days of the study’s initiation.” The research was published in Pediatrics.

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Toddlers Who Grow Up Near Nature Are Less Likely To Have Emotional Issues, Study Shows

HealthDay (4/11, Thompson) reports, “Toddlers who grow up near nature are less likely to have emotional issues, even if the green space is just a park or a big back yard, a new study shows.” Investigators “examined data from more than 2,100 children in 199 counties across 41 U.S. states.” The researchers found that “the more green space there is within three-fourths of a mile from a child’s home, the fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression they’ll have between the ages of 2 and 5.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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FDA Commissioner Calls On Congress To Pass Law Mandating Lead Testing For Food Manufacturers

NBC News (4/11, Lovelace) reports, “The head of the Food and Drug Administration urged Congress on Thursday to pass legislation mandating that food manufacturers test for lead in products imported to the United States.” FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf’s “comment was in response to a question from Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., the ranking member of the House Committee on Oversight and Accountability, during a hearing that touched on the FDA’s response to issues including lead-contaminated cinnamon applesauce pouches, which have sickened hundreds of children.”

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Unvaccinated Travelers Returning To US Driving Increase In Measles Outbreaks, CDC Says

The AP (4/11, Shastri) reports, “Measles outbreaks in the U.S. and abroad are raising health experts’ concern about the preventable, once-common childhood virus.” In the US, “measles cases already are nearly double the total for all of last year.” The CDC has “documented 113 cases as of April 5. There have been seven outbreaks and most of U.S. cases – 73% – are linked to those flare-ups.” On Thursday, the CDC “released a report on recent measles case trends, noting that cases in the first three months of this year were 17 times higher than the average number seen in the first three months of the previous three years.” The report pointed to “unvaccinated Americans who got infected in the Middle East and Africa and brought measles back to the U.S.” as a major source of this year’s outbreaks. NBC News (4/11, Bendix) says, “The CDC report called for more widespread vaccination coverage. Around 91% of measles cases recorded in the U.S. since January 2020 were among people who were unvaccinated or had an unknown vaccination status, it said.” The virus “has been considered eliminated in the U.S. since 2000, meaning the disease is no longer constantly present, though there are still occasional outbreaks.”

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Providers Navigating Change Healthcare Outage With Alternate Vendors

Modern Healthcare (4/10, Berryman) reports, “Providers are seeing some improvements following the Change Healthcare cyberattack nearly two months ago, but not necessarily because they are reconnecting to restored systems.” Providers “are submitting claims to payers through alternate vendors, allowing them to generate cash.” However, “the level of claims and payments moving among healthcare organizations that had heavily relied on Change Healthcare is still far from normal.” For its part, “Change Healthcare is making progress toward restoration but has more to do.” For example, “some hospitals that have reconnected to available Change Healthcare systems are reporting technical issues, said a Greater New York Hospital Association spokesperson.”

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Fetal-Maternal Outcomes Similar Across All Levels Of Antiphospholipid Antibody Titers Following Appropriate Treatment, Study Finds

Rheumatology Advisor (4/10, Kuhns) reports, “Fetal-maternal outcomes were comparable between patients with low-titer and medium-high titer positivity for antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), following appropriate treatment, according to study results published in Clinical Rheumatology.” These results challenge “the conventional belief that only higher aPL titers are directly linked to worse pregnancy outcomes.”

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History Of Carbapenem Use, Elevated SOFA Scores Tied To Increased Risk For Third-Generation Cephalosporin-Resistant BSIs Among Children, Study Finds

Infectious Disease Advisor (4/10, Nye) reports, “Children with a history of carbapenem use and elevated pediatric Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores are at increased risk for third-generation cephalosporin-resistant bloodstream infections (BSIs), according to study findings published in Infection and Drug Resistance.” In the study, “patients with resistance were more likely to have pediatric SOFA scores of at least 2 (33.33% vs 17.83%; P =.007), a history of carbapenem use (39.02% vs 23.26%; P =.010), and a prior BSI diagnosis (21.95% vs 10.08%; P =.016).”

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Montelukast Sodium Combined With Conventional Treatment More Effective Than Conventional Treatment Alone For Pediatric CVA, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (4/10, Stong) reports, “Montelukast sodium combined with conventional treatment was more efficacious compared with conventional treatment alone for treating pediatric cough variant asthma (CVA), according to study findings published in Pediatric Pulmonology.” In a meta-analysis, “a significantly increased treatment effectiveness rate was observed in the combined treatment group vs the control group, with a statistically significant difference.”

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Neonates With Prenatally Resolved Fetal Growth Restriction At Increased Risk For Adverse Perinatal Outcomes, Study Finds

Healio (4/10, Welsh) reports, “Neonates with prenatally resolved fetal growth restriction [FGR] continue to have increased risks for adverse perinatal outcomes, according to study results published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.” According to the study, “pregnancies with resolved FGR and pregnancies with persistent FGR had lower mean birth weight (2,945 g and 2,538 g, respectively vs. no FGR, 3,481 g) and a higher percentage of these pregnancies had a birth weight percentile of 10% or less (21% and 47.4%, respectively vs. no FGR, 3.9%), but similar rates of cesarean section and operative vaginal delivery.”

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Novel Risk Prediction Tool Effective For Identifying Infants At Increased Risk For Severe RSV Outcomes, Study Finds

Infectious Disease Advisor (4/10) reports, “A novel risk prediction tool was found to be effective for identifying infants at increased risk for severe outcomes due to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-related lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), according to findings published in Open Forum Infectious Diseases.” In the study, “researchers found that the tool had good predictive accuracy for identifying infants at risk for ICU admission due to severe RSV-related LRTI, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.78. In a sensitivity analysis of high-risk preterm infants (n=49,209), the tool demonstrated similar discriminative performance.”

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Nearly 40% Of Pediatric Patients With Oligoarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Treated With Intra-Articular Corticosteroids Required No Additional Therapy, Study Says

Healio (4/8, Cooper) reports a recent study found 38.5% “of children with oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis treated with intra-articular corticosteroids required no additional therapy.” Published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, the study also found that “further therapy consisted of only” intra-articular corticosteroid injection for 15.5% of patients, and “systemic therapy was needed for 45.9% of patients, all but one of whom were treated with methotrexate, with the other receiving sulfasalazine.”

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Children Born To Mothers With A Hypertensive Disorder Of Pregnancy Not More Likely To Have Childhood Asthma, Research Shows

Healio (4/9, Hornick) reports, “Children born to mothers with a hypertensive disorder of pregnancy are not more likely to have childhood asthma than those born to mothers without the disorder,” researchers concluded after examining data from 14,929 mother-child pairs and finding that “at the point of turning 5 years old, 2,153 children (14.4%) from the total cohort had received an asthma diagnosis.” The total “included 1,975 (14.3%) born to mothers without hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (n = 13,790) and 178 (15.6%) born to mothers with one of these disorders.” The findings were published in Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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New WIC Rules To Emphasize More Fruits, Vegetables, Less Dairy

The New York Times (4/9, Qiu) reports, “The Agriculture Department said on Tuesday that low-income women and children eligible for a food aid program would receive more cash for purchases of fruits and vegetables, with less assistance available for milk.” The WIC rule changes will bring the program “more in line with the government’s current dietary guidelines. It is the first update to the program in a decade and will take effect in two years.” The AP (4/9, Aleccia) reports, “Under the new rules, fruits and vegetable vouchers in 2024 will provide $26 per month for kids ages 1 through 4; $47 per month for pregnant and postpartum women; and $52 for breastfeeding women.” The new rules “also expand access to whole grains like quinoa, wild rice and millet and to foods such as teff and whole wheat naan.” Reuters (4/9, Douglas) reports the final provision also “increases allowances for…seafood, and decreases the amounts of juice, dairy and cheese. It also adds more non-dairy options like plant-based and lactose-free milk.”

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England’s NHS Restricts Gender Treatments For Children Citing Lack Of Evidence For Benefits, Concern For Long-Term Harms

The New York Times (4/9, Ghorayshi) reports England’s National Health Service (NHS) began “restricting gender treatments for children this month, making it the fifth European country to limit the medications because of a lack of evidence of their benefits and concern about long-term harms.” The NHS based the change on “a four-year review released Tuesday evening.” The department “will no longer offer drugs that block puberty, except for patients enrolled in clinical research. And the report recommended that hormones like testosterone and estrogen…be prescribed to minors with ‘extreme caution.’”

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Acetaminophen Use During Pregnancy Not Tied To Higher Risk Of Autism, ADHD, Or Other Neurodevelopmental Disorders In Children, Study Finds

CNN (4/9, Cheng) reports, “Using acetaminophen, the active ingredient in Tylenol, during pregnancy was not associated with increased risk of autism, ADHD or intellectual disability in children, a new study” published in JAMA found. A sibling analysis “found that there was no evidence of increased risk of autism, ADHD or intellectual disability associated with acetaminophen use during pregnancy, according to the study led by scientists from the Karolinska Institute in Sweden and Drexel University.” HealthDay (4/9, Thompson) reports, “The analysis of more than 2.4 million children born in Sweden included siblings not exposed to the drug before birth, researchers said.”

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FDA Approves Dolutegravir/Lamivudine For Adolescents With HIV-1 Infection

Pharmacy Times (4/8, McGovern) reports, “The FDA has approved dolutegravir/lamivudine (Dovato; ViiV Healthcare) for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in adolescents.” The new indication is for teens “who are 12 years of age or older that weigh at least 25 kg who have no previous treatment history of antiretroviral (ARV), or for patients who are virologically suppressed (HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL) with no history of treatment failure and who are on a stable ARV regimen looking to replace the current regimen.” In a late-stage trial in this population, “26 of the 30 participants who completed the study achieved and maintained viral suppression at week 48.”

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Study Finds Excessive Levels Of PFAS In Surface, Groundwaters Globally

CNN (4/8, LaMotte) reports, “Potentially toxic chemicals called PFAS (perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances) are found in surface and groundwaters around the world at levels much higher than many international regulators allow, a new study found.” Even in places “with no known source of contamination, 31% of ground water samples exceeded threshold limits proposed in March 2023 by the US Environmental Protection Agency, according to the study, and nearly 70% exceeded standards set by Health Canada.” The study was published in Nature Geoscience.

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Use Of Recommended Antibiotic Prophylaxis And Transcranial Doppler Ultrasound Testing Low In Children With SCA, Findings Show

Hematology Advisor (4/8) reports, “The use of recommended antibiotic prophylaxis and transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) testing was low in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA),” researchers concluded in a study of claims-based quality measures. The study was published in Pediatrics.

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Harness System For Children With Movement Difficulties Improved Or Stabilized Motor Function Among Children Treated For SMA, Study Finds

SMA News Today (4/8, Bryson) reports, “A harness system designed for children with movement difficulties, the Portable Mobility Aid for Children (PUMA), improved or stabilized motor function among young patients treated for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in a small study” published in PLOS One. Out “of the 32 children whose data were evaluated in the study, 10 (31%) gained 19 new milestones, including crawling, standing with assistance, and walking with assistance. Two children (6%) showed improved Bayley GM scores.”

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Children With SMA Identified By Newborn Screening Had Better Outcomes With Disease-Modifying Treatment Than Those Diagnosed After Symptom Onset, Study Finds

MedPage Today (4/8, Henderson) reports, “Children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) identified by newborn screening showed better motor development with disease-modifying treatment than those diagnosed after symptom onset, a German cohort study showed.” More than “nine out of 10 (90.9%) of kids identified with SMA on newborn screening gained the ability to sit independently at a median age of 9 months, compared with 74.2% of children diagnosed after symptom onset who could sit independently at a median age of 14 months, reported” researchers in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Youth With Mood Disorders 30% Less Likely To Receive Driver’s License, Study Finds

Healio (4/8) says, “Youth with mood disorders” are 30% less likely “to receive their driver’s license compared with those without disorders,” research published in JAMA Network Open shows. In addition, researchers found that “licensed youth with mood disorders had higher overall crash rates at 12 months (adjusted RR = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.01-1.34) and 48 months…vs. licensed youth without mood disorders.”

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Improved Airway Function Appears To Mediate Association Between Vitamin C Supplementation, Wheeze In Children Whose Mothers Smoked And Received Vitamin C During Pregnancy, Study Finds

MedPage Today (4/8, Short) reports, “Improved airway function appeared to mediate the association between vitamin C supplementation and wheeze in kids whose mothers smoked and received vitamin C during pregnancy, a secondary analysis of clinical trial data found.” In the study, “longitudinal analyses of forced expiratory flow between 25% and 75% expired volume (FEF25%-75%) at ages 3, 12, and 60 months showed significantly higher values for children whose moms took vitamin C compared with kids of placebo-treated mothers (P<0.001), and a greater increase in FEF25%-75% with increasing age despite no postnatal supplementation, reported” researchers in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Children Born With Acetaminophen In Cord Blood At Greater Risk For Asthma, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (4/5, Stong) reported, “Acetaminophen and acetaminophen glucuronide in cord blood are associated with an increased risk for asthma without allergic comorbidities at age 6 years and older, according to a study in the Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology.” In the study, “patients who had detectable values for all 3 acetaminophen metabolites had a significantly increased risk for asthma without allergic comorbidities compared with those who had no acetaminophen metabolites detected in cord blood (OR, 2.51; 95% CI, 1.12-5.61; P =.0108).”

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Commercially Insured Youths With T2D Less Likely To See Specialists Compared To Counterparts With T1D, Study Finds

MedPage Today (4/5, Monaco) reported, “Commercially insured youths with type 2 diabetes were less likely to see specialists compared with their counterparts with type 1 diabetes, a cross-sectional study of claims data indicated.” In the study, “the incidence of ambulatory claims from an endocrine and/or diabetes clinician was 39% lower among patients with type 2 diabetes versus those with type 1 diabetes…reported researchers” in JAMA Network Open.

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Nonbinary Youths Report Worse Depressive Symptoms Than Binary Transgender Youths, Study Finds

Healio (4/5, Monostra) said, “Nonbinary youths report more depression and are more likely to attempt self-harm than binary transgender youths, according to study findings published in LGBT Health.” In the study, “nonbinary youths had higher scores on the internalizing problems and depressive problems scales than binary adolescents. Nonbinary participants were also more likely to report self-harm than binary adolescents.”

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Irregular Sleep, Late Bedtimes Linked To Worse Grades, Behavioral Issues Among High School Students, Study Finds

Healio (4/5, Weldon) reported, “A study identified late or varied bedtimes as risk factors for worse grades and behavioral issues among high school students, according to results published in Sleep.” In the study, “adolescents who went to bed later, got up later or varied the number of hours they slept per night received fewer A grades.” Additionally, they “were more likely to be suspended or expelled in the last 2 years if they got up later, varied the number of hours they slept each night or if they varied the time they went to bed each night.”

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Survey Finds Regular Use Of Alcohol, Tobacco, Drugs Among High Schoolers Continuing Downward Trend

The New York Times (4/6, Richtel) reported, “Regular use of alcohol, tobacco, and drugs among high school students has been on a long downward trend.” Last year, “46 percent of seniors said that they’d had a drink in the year before being interviewed; that is a precipitous drop from 88 percent in 1979, when the behavior peaked, according to the annual Monitoring the Future survey, a closely watched national poll of youth substance use.” Only “15 percent of seniors said that they had smoked a cigarette in their life, down from a peak of 76 percent in 1977. Illicit drug use among teens has remained low and fairly steady for the past three decades, with some notable declines during the Covid-19 pandemic.”

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CMS Offers Strategies For Value-Based Care Models To Improve Patient Outcomes, Reduce Spending

RevCycle Intelligence (4/4, Bailey) reports, “Value-based care models must address both primary and specialty care to improve patient outcomes and reduce spending. A CMS Innovation Center strategy details ongoing efforts to integrate specialty care into the healthcare system.” The strategy “includes four pathways that support specialty care coordination and integration in value-based care models.” The article provides details on each pathway.

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Givinostat Slowed Physical Decline As Measured By Stair Climbing Speed For A Subset Of Boys With DMD, Trial Finds

MedPage Today (4/4, Putka) reports, “Givinostat (Duvyzat) slowed physical decline as measured by stair climbing speed for a subset of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), according to the phase III trial that supported the drug’s recent approval for this indication.” Although “the boys still declined over 72 weeks on the oral drug, their times for a four-stair climb assessment slowed by a relative 14% less from baseline to week 72 compared with the placebo group.” The findings were published in Lancet Neurology.

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Baseline MRI Scans May Be Useful In Predicting Prognoses Of Adolescents At Clinical High Risk For Psychosis, Study Finds

Neurology Advisor (4/4, Nye) reports, “Baseline magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans may be useful in predicting the prognoses of adolescents who are at clinical high risk for psychosis, according to study results.” Altogether, more than 1100 “adolescents and young adults at clinical high risk and 1029 healthy individuals were included in the study.” The findings were published in Molecular Psychiatry.

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Children With Severe Asthma Exacerbations Have Nasopharyngeal Microbiota Characterized By Overabundance Of Staphylococcus And Oral Microbes Absence Of Certain Beneficial Bacteria, Research Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (4/4, Goldberg) reports, “Children with severe asthma exacerbations have a nasopharyngeal microbiota characterized by an overabundance of Staphylococcus and oral microbes and the absence of certain beneficial bacteria, according to study findings.” Researchers came to this conclusion after conducting “a cross-sectional study using data from patients in 3 different study cohorts.” The research was published in The Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology.

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When Children Have Anaphylaxis With Breathing Difficulties, Drug Reactions, And Epinephrine Doses, Pediatric ICU Admission Is Likely, Research Indicates

Healio (4/4, Gawel) reports, “When children have anaphylaxis with breathing difficulties, drug reactions and epinephrine doses, pediatric ICU admission is likely, according to a poster presentation” at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting. Additionally, “epinephrine use at the hospital…was suboptimal…wrote” the researchers.

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Study Finds 394 Percent Increase In Perinatal PTSD Diagnoses From 2008 To 2020

HCP Live (4/3, Derman) reports, “A new study found a 394 percent increase in perinatal PTSD diagnoses, from 37.7 per 10,000 deliveries in 2008 to 186.3 per 10,000 deliveries in 2020.” Investigators came to this conclusion after looking at data on “621,148 participants with 736,323 deliveries.” The findings were published in Health Affairs.

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White Women Suffering From Depression Or Anxiety During Or After Pregnancy Are Nearly Twice As Likely To Receive Treatment As Women Of Color Are, Study Finds

HealthDay (4/3, Thompson) reports, “White women suffering from depression or anxiety during or after pregnancy are nearly twice as likely [to] receive treatment as women of color are, researchers” found. Approximately “two-thirds of white women (67%) said they received mental health treatment for their diagnosed depression or anxiety during pregnancy or in their first year of motherhood.” Conversely, “fewer than two out of five (37%) Black and Hispanic received treatment for their pregnancy-related mood disorders, results show.” Meanwhile, “that number dipped to one in five (20%) for other ethnicities, including Asian, Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, Middle Eastern and North African.” The research was published in Health Affairs.

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Commonwealth Fund To Launch Employer-Sponsored Coverage Task Force Aimed At Addressing Affordability And Access

Fierce Healthcare (4/4, Minemyer) reports, “Employer-sponsored coverage remains the main way half of Americans secure care, and the Commonwealth Fund said Thursday that it would launch a new task force aimed at addressing affordability and access.” The Commonwealth Fund “said the National Task Force on the Future Role of Employers in the U.S. Health System is aiming to identify market incentives and regulatory policies that could drive better healthcare for workers, including improvements to population health and care delivery.” According to Fierce Healthcare, “The task force’s members include representatives from organizations across the political spectrum.”

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ADHD Drug Shortage Continues With No End In Sight

Axios (4/3, Reed) reports, “Shortages of commonly prescribed drugs for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have stretched on for nearly 18 months, with no clear end in sight for many Americans who’ve found it difficult if not impossible to get the treatments.” Factors driving the shortages “include pandemic-driven increases in demand, caps on production of the drugs, and the threat of rolling back rules making it easier to prescribe stimulants virtually.”

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Asthma/Sleep-Disordered Breathing Overlap Highly Prevalent Among Low-Income Urban School-Age Children, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (4/3, Goldberg) reports, “Asthma/sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) overlap is highly prevalent among school-age children in low-income urban neighborhoods and is associated with poorer lung function and atopy, especially rhinitis. These were among study findings published in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society.” In the study, researchers “found no difference between the reference group and any of the asthma/SDB subgroups in prevalence of obesity (mean percentile, 30.0%), prematurity (mean, 18.8%), or BMI percentile (mean percentile, 69.5 [29.9]).”

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Parents Of Children With Cancer Made Mental Health Visits More Often Than Other Parents, Study Finds

Healio (4/2, Friedman) reports, “Parents of children with cancer made mental health visits, including those for anxiety and depression, significantly more often than other parents, according to” a study. The data indicated that “more than 18% of parents caring for children with cancer sought mental health care in the cross-sectional study.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Children With Polyarticular-Course JIA Who Received Second TNF Inhibitor After Not Responding To One Initially Did Just As Well As Those Who Changed To Different Drug, Study Shows

MedPage Today (4/2, Gever) reports, “Kids with polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) who received a second tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor after failing one initially did just as well as those who changed to a different type of drug, a registry study indicated.” Researchers found that among 216 patients with JIA “in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) registry who didn’t respond adequately to a first TNF inhibitor, 43% achieved minimal disease activity or better at 6 months with another TNF inhibitor versus 39% among those receiving another medical class.” The findings were published in Arthritis Care and Research.

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Obesity In Childhood Linked To Greater Risk Of Developing Multiple Sclerosis In Adulthood, Study Finds

Multiple Sclerosis News Today (4/2, Wexler) reports “obesity in childhood is associated with…more than double the risk of developing multiple sclerosis (MS) in adulthood, although the overall risk is low, according to a new study.” Researchers found that “after a median follow-up time of 5.6 years, when participants were a median age of 20.8 years, 0.13% of patients with childhood obesity had developed MS.” Meanwhile, “in the control group, 0.06% were later diagnosed with MS – a more than 2.3 times higher risk of MS in people with childhood obesity even after accounting for certain confounding factors.” The findings will be presented at the European Congress on Obesity.

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Researchers See High Frequency Of Suicidal Thoughts, Behaviors Among Children With Autism Aged 8 And Younger

Healio (4/2, Weldon) reports, “A survey of caregivers revealed an ‘unexpectedly high frequency’ of suicidal thoughts and behaviors among children with autism aged 8 years or younger, researchers” found. The findings “suggest an earlier onset of suicidal thoughts and behaviors…than has previously been observed among children with autism, the researchers said.” The research was published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Anti-Smoking Groups Sue US Government Over Delayed Ban On Menthol Cigarettes

The AP (4/2, Perrone) reports, “Anti-smoking groups sued the U.S. government Tuesday over a long-awaited ban on menthol cigarettes, which has been idling at the White House for months.” The AP adds, “Health officials under President Joe Biden initially targeted last August to publish the rule eliminating the…flavor,” but “late last year, White House officials said they would take until March to review the rule.” CNN (4/2, Christensen) reports that the plaintiffs are National Medical Association, the African American Tobacco Control Leadership Council, and Action on Smoking and Health.

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Children And Teenagers With Excess Weight Were More Likely To Have High Blood Pressure In Middle Age, Study Finds

HealthDay (4/2, Thompson) reports, “Children and teenagers with excess weight were more likely to have high blood pressure in middle age, researchers” found. The study found “a linear relationship between adult high blood pressure and childhood overweight and obesity.” The findings are scheduled to be presented at the upcoming European Congress on Obesity.

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ONC Releases Five-Year Strategic Plan Outlining Health Technology Priorities

Fierce Healthcare reports the Office for the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) has released “a draft strategic plan outlining health technology priorities over the next five years focusing on health equity and artificial intelligence.” The plan (PDF) highlights “federal health IT goals and objectives to improve health experiences and outcomes for individuals, populations, and communities.” The HHS agency “also focused on how to use health IT to promote opportunities for improving health equity, advancing scientific discovery and innovation and modernizing the nation’s public health infrastructure, officials said.”

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Patients With JIA May Improve More Rapidly With Early Initiation Of Biologics, Study Finds

Medscape (4/1, Haelle, Subscription Publication) reports research found that “early initiation of biologics – within the first 2 months of symptom presentation – appears to have a significant impact on how rapidly patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) improve.” It also found, “however, not all patients who improved rapidly during a 3-year follow-up period needed biologics.” The study included “259 patients (65% of the original cohort) who had at least one cJADAS-10 assessment in each year of follow-up.” The findings were presented at the online annual meeting of the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance.

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PIVCs Secured With Integrated Securement Dressings And Tissue Adhesive Fail Significantly Less Than Those With Bordered Polyurethane In Children, Findings Show

MedPage Today (4/1, Henderson) reports a study published in JAMA Pediatrics found “peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) secured with integrated securement dressings and tissue adhesive failed significantly less than those with standard-of-care bordered polyurethane.” The study of data from 383 pediatric patients found “PIVCs secured with integrated securement dressings alone had numerically but not statistically significantly less failure than standard bordered polyurethane dressing.”

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Pregnancy Weight Gain Below IOM Minimum Recommendations For Patients With Obesity May Not Increase Risk For Maternal And Fetal Complications, Study Suggests

MedPage Today (4/1, Robertson) reports, “Pregnancy weight gain below the current minimum recommended by the U.S. Institute of Medicine (IOM) for obese patients did not appear to increase their risk for maternal and fetal complications and was linked to reduced risk for severely obese patients,” researchers concluded in a large population-based study in Sweden. Researchers found that “with a body mass index (BMI) of 30.0 to 39.9, pregnancy weight gains below the 5 kg (11 lb) recommended did not significantly increase risk of a composite of adverse outcomes.” The Lancet published the data.

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Biden Administration Misses Another Deadline To Issue Final Rule On A Ban Of Menthol Flavored Cigarettes

Reuters (4/1, Tabassum) reports the FDA’s “proposal to ban menthol flavored cigarettes in the United States faced another setback, according to anti-tobacco advocates who noted that White House officials have missed another deadline to issue a final rule on a ban.” The Biden Administration “delayed issuing a final rule in December and now has missed the new deadline it set to issue the rule by March 2024, according to a statement on Monday from the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids and the NAACP.”

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High-Efficacy Therapies Given Early Can Reduce Risk Of Disability Worsening In Children And Adolescents With MS, Study Finds

Multiple Sclerosis News Today (4/1) reports, “High-efficacy therapies given early can significantly reduce the risk of disability worsening in children and adolescents with multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly when treatment is started while patients have fairly minimal disability, according to a new study.” Although “lower-efficacy therapies were also associated with a reduced risk of disability progression in people with pediatric-onset MS…compared with no treatment, their benefits were more modest.” The findings were published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

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Children Exposed To Vaping May Have Higher Levels Of Metabolites Linked To Chemicals Found In E-Cigarettes In Their Bodies, Study Says

USA Today (3/29, Walrath-Holdridge) reported that children “who were regularly around vaping had higher levels of metabolites linked to chemicals found in e-cigarettes in their bodies,” according to researchers who performed blood, saliva, and exhaled breath tests in children aged four through 12. Researchers tested “48 parent/child pairs, 22 of which included parents who vaped daily and 26 of which included parents who did not vape or smoke.” Findings from the pilot study were presented during the conference of the National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners.

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Frequent Recurring Headaches In Children Are Associated With Modifiable Risk Factors, Study Finds

Neurology Advisor (3/29, Nguyen) reported, “Frequent recurring headaches in children and youth are associated with modifiable risk factors, such as meal irregularity and increased screen time, according to study findings.” The study also indicated that “participants living in households where they were exposed to indoor smoking had an increased risk for frequent recurrent headaches.” The research was published in Neurology.

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Children With Obesity Have Higher Likelihood Of Developing MS Later In Life, Study Finds

HealthDay (3/29, Mundell) reported that children with obesity “face double the odds of developing multiple sclerosis later in life, a new study warns.” Investigators looked at data on nearly 22,000 children. The researchers found that “while 0.06% of the…children” without obesity “went on to develop MS, the rate more than doubled, to 0.13%, among people who had” had obesity “during childhood.” The findings are scheduled to be presented at the European Congress on Obesity.

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Most Sudden Infant Deaths Involved Unsafe Sleeping Practices, Study Indicates

The Washington Post (3/31, Blakemore) reports over “three-quarters of sudden infant deaths involved multiple unsafe sleep practices, including co-sleeping, a recent analysis suggests.” The study published in Pediatrics examined “7,595 sudden infant death cases in a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention registry between 2011 and 2020. The majority of deaths occurred in babies less than 3 months old.” Data indicate “59.5 percent of the infants who died suddenly were sharing a sleep surface at the time of death, and 75.9 percent were in an adult bed when they died.”

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Poll Finds Majority Of Teenagers Increasingly Using Social Media To Self-Diagnose Mental Health Issues

The Hill (3/30, Lonas) reported a poll from the EdWeek Research Center shows that “teenagers are increasingly using social media to self-diagnose their mental health issues,” specifically, “55 percent of students use social media to self-diagnose, and 65 percent of teachers say they’ve seen the phenomenon in their classrooms.” The poll also shows that “72 percent of educators believe social media has made it easier for students to be more open about mental health struggles they are facing.”

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Moderate To Vigorous Physical Activity During Childhood Associated With Less Cardiac Work During Adolescence, Findings Show

According to Healio (3/29, Kellner), “Moderate to vigorous physical activity during childhood was associated with less cardiac work during adolescence,” findings published in the Journal of the American Heart Association show. Investigators “also found the reverse was true – increased sedentary time during childhood led to greater cardiac work in adolescence.”

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ONC Releases Draft Plan For Federal Health IT Strategy

EHR Intelligence reports, “ONC has released the draft 2024-2030 Federal Health IT Strategic Plan for public comment.” The draft “identifies opportunities to modernize public health data infrastructure to address technological gaps underscored by the COVID-19 pandemic,” and “seeks to advance health equity by promoting equitable access to EHI and communications technology, as well as fair representation in research initiatives.” Finally, it “emphasizes the urgent need for the federal government to navigate the use of AI in healthcare to ensure responsible and effective use of the technology.”

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FDA Expands Approval For Tenofovir Alafenamide To Treat Chronic HBV In Pediatric Patients

Drug Topics (3/28, Meara) reports, “The FDA has approved a supplemental new drug application (sNDA) from Gilead Sciences for tenofovir alafenamide (Vemlidy) to treat chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in pediatric patients 6 years of age and older with compensated liver disease who weigh at least 25 kg, the company announced in a release.” The expanded indication comes after trials found “19% of patients who received the treatment achieved the reduction in HBV DNA levels, compared to 0% in placebo.”

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Machine Learning Model Identifies Combinations Of Air Pollutants Tied To Increased Asthma Symptoms Among Children

Healio (3/28, Gawel) reports, “Researchers used machine learning to identify 25 combinations of air pollutants that were associated with increased asthma symptoms among children in Spokane, Washington, according to a study published in Science of The Total Environment.” In the study, the machine learning model “identified increased levels of 14 single and 11 multiple combinations of air pollutants associated with worsening asthma symptoms in at least one of three exposure periods, defined as the most recent year (2019), the previous 3 years (2017-2019) and the previous 5 years (2014-2019). Wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, dyspnea, breathlessness and inhaler use were included in the reported symptoms.”

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Children With IBD May Have High Rate Of Dermatologic Conditions, Cutaneous Infections, Review Finds

Dermatology Advisor (3/28, Nye) reports, “Children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) may likely have a high rate of dermatologic conditions and cutaneous infections, according to results of a retrospective review.” The research found “there was a higher prevalence of psoriasis among patients with severe IBD (20%) vs those with moderate IBD (3.3%) and mild IBD (0%; P <.001).” Furthermore, patients with severe IBD “had a higher prevalence of perianal fistula (14.3% vs 8.8% vs 1.7%, respectively; P =.012), and pyoderma gangrenosum (8.6% vs 2.2% vs 0.0%, respectively; P =.008).” The findings were published in Pediatric Dermatology.

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Oral Corticosteroids Helped Reduce Wheeze Severity, Length Of Hospital Stay In Children Experiencing Acute Preschool Wheeze, Research Finds

MedPage Today (3/28, Short) reports, “Oral corticosteroids helped reduce wheeze severity and length of hospital stay in children experiencing acute preschool wheeze, a pooled analysis of patient-level randomized trial data showed.” Researchers found that “the medication reduced wheezing severity score (WSS) after 4 hours to a greater degree than did placebo,” but “this…was not maintained after 12 hours.” Additionally, “patients treated with corticosteroids also spent 3.18 fewer hours in the hospital compared with placebo recipients…according to the meta-analysis.” The findings were published in Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

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High-Activity Days Tied To Increased Nocturnal Hypoglycemia Among Children With T1D, Study Finds

Endocrinology Advisor (3/28, Nye) reports, “Children with type 1 diabetes have more hypoglycemia events on nights that follow high-activity days, according to results of a real-world observational study published in Diabetes Care.” In the study, “more hypoglycemia events occurred on nights following a day with at least 90 minutes of exercise (19%) compared with 10 to 30 minutes (12%), 30 to 60 minutes (13%), and 60 to 90 minutes (15%; P =.01).”

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US State Department Offering $10M For Information On Hackers Behind Change Healthcare Cyberattack

Reuters reports, “The U.S. State Department on Wednesday offered up to $10 million for information on the ‘Blackcat’ ransomware gang who hit the UnitedHealth Group’s tech unit and snarled insurance payments across America.” The unit, “Change Healthcare, plays a critical role in processing payments from insurance companies to practitioners, and the outage caused by the cyberattack has in some cases left patients and doctors out of pocket.” Earlier this month, the hackers “said…UnitedHealth paid a $22 million ransom in a bid to recover its systems, but whether Blackcat honored its end of the bargain has not been made public.”

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Body Dysmorphic Disorder And Appearance Preoccupation Were Common Among Youth, Particularly Adolescent Girls, Study Finds

Healio (3/27, Jenkins) reports, “Body dysmorphic disorder and appearance preoccupation were relatively common among youth, especially adolescent girls, according to a study.” Investigators also found that “body dysmorphic disorder…was associated with high levels of comorbid psychopathology, risk and psychosocial impairment.” The findings were published in Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Abnormal Glucose Tolerance Is Common In Young Patients With CF, Research Finds

Cystic Fibrosis News Today (3/27, Maia) reports, “Abnormal glucose tolerance is common in young” patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), but “early screening, starting at the age of 5, may lead to better health outcomes by making it possible to intervene early, a meta-analysis study found.” Investigators came to this conclusion after analyzing “data from 457 studies involving more than 520,000” patients with CF. The research was published in the Journal of Cystic Fibrosis.

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CMS Finalizes Rule Simplifying Medicaid, CHIP Enrollment And Renewal

Bloomberg Law (3/27, Belloni, Subscription Publication) reports, “The Biden administration on Wednesday finalized the second portion of a two-part rule that will simplify the enrollment process for beneficiaries covered under Medicaid, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, and the Basic Health Program.” The guidance “seeks to create timeliness standards for eligibility redeterminations, make it easier for beneficiaries to transition between programs, and modernize recordkeeping requirements so that eligibility determinations are properly documented.” Modern Healthcare reports the new rule “will standardize processes across states and apply consumer protections from the Affordable Care Act.” It also “gets rid of annual and lifetime limits on children’s coverage, and children will still have access to CHIP regardless of whether a family is unable to pay premiums. Waiting periods for CHIP coverage have been removed.”

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Telehealth Was Linked To Lower No-Show Rates For Healthcare Visits Among Transgender, Gender-Diverse Youth In Rural Areas, Study Finds

mHealth Intelligence reports, “Telehealth was associated with lower no-show rates for healthcare visits among transgender and gender-diverse youth in rural areas, according to” a study. The findings were published in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Worldwide, Approximately 20% Of Adolescents Aged 13 To 15 Years Who Do Not Smoke Are Susceptible To Cigarette Use, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (3/26, Stong) reports, “Worldwide, approximately 20% of adolescents aged 13 to 15 years who don’t smoke are susceptible to cigarette use, including 20.4% of boys and 19.4% of girls, researchers” found. The investigators found that “cigarette smoking susceptibility ranged from 0.9% in Turkmenistan to 44.1% in Vanuatu.” The research was published in Pediatrics.

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Review Shows That Medication Has Best Chance To Improve ADHD Outcomes In Children

Healio (3/26, Weldon) reports, “A systematic review of hundreds of studies showed that medication has the best chance to improve ADHD outcomes in children and that other treatments have varied effects.” Researchers wrote, “The body of evidence shows that numerous intervention classes significantly improve ADHD symptom severity.” They added, “This includes large but variable effects for amphetamines, moderate-sized effects for methylphenidate, [norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors], and alpha-agonists, and small effects for youth-directed psychosocial treatment, parent support, neurofeedback, and nutrition or supplements. Cognitive training and school interventions did not significantly improve ADHD symptoms.” The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Elevated Levels Of Galectin-3 In Bloodstream Of Children With Clinically Stable CF Correlated With Worse Lung Function, Study Finds

Cystic Fibrosis News Today (3/26, Bryson) reports that researchers have found that “elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory signaling protein galectin-3 in the bloodstream of children with clinically stable cystic fibrosis (CF) significantly correlated with worse lung function.” The study included “143 children with clinically stable CF.” The findings were published in the European Journal of Pediatrics.

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Researchers See Increased Risk Of Developing Diseases With A Possible Autoimmune Pathogenesis In Children And Adolescents With IBD

HCPlive (3/26, Brooks) reports, “Findings from a recent study are highlighting an increased risk of developing diseases with a possible autoimmune pathogenesis in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).” The research “showed a heightened risk of psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritis, celiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, as well as type 1 and type 2 diabetes among patients with early-onset IBD, with further analysis revealing only psoriatic arthritis and spondyloarthritis occurred earlier in the IBD cohort than in the matched references.” The findings were published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

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Healthcare Leaders Launch TRAIN Consortium To Set AI Standards

Health IT Analytics reports, “Healthcare leaders came together recently to launch the Trustworthy & Responsible AI Network (TRAIN), a consortium created to explore and set standards for the safe application of artificial intelligence (AI) in health care.” As the nascent technology “advances, proponents emphasize that the technology’s capabilities could transform the healthcare industry by improving efficiency, reducing costs and enhancing care delivery.” However, “before AI can support improved health outcomes, development and evaluation standards must be created. TRAIN is designed to help operationalize these standards to ensure that healthcare AI is both responsible and effective.”

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Medicaid Disenrollments Surpass 18M, Above HHS Projections

HealthPayerIntelligence reports that following the end of the pandemic public health emergency period, “HHS had projected that 15 million beneficiaries would lose Medicaid coverage.” But “as of March 20, 2024, more than 18 million people have been disenrolled.” Worse, “35 million beneficiaries’ eligibility redeterminations have either still not been completed or have not been reported.”

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Around Two-Thirds Of Children Worry That Taking Sick Day Will Impact Grades, Poll Finds

HealthDay (3/25, Miller) reports, “Most parents are torn about letting their middle or high school students take a sick day.” In a recent survey, – “based on 1,300 responses last month from parents of 11- to 18-year-olds – 2 in 3 said their child frets about how missing school will affect their grades. The same number worry about missing friends or school activities.” If it is unclear “just how sick a child is, more than half of parents are likely to keep them home, according to the poll. Another 25% send them to school and keep their fingers crossed. About 1 in 5 let the child decide.” The poll was reported by the University of Michigan Health’s C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital.

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Participation In Free School Meals Program Tied To Decrease In Obesity Prevalence Among Students, Study Finds

Healio (3/25, Weldon) reports, “Participation in a free school meals program was associated with a modest decrease in obesity prevalence among students at more than 3,500 California schools, according to research findings published in Pediatrics.” According to the study, participation in the program “was associated with a 0.6-percentage-point net decrease in obesity prevalence after policy adoption when compared with nonparticipant schools, corresponding to a 2.4% relative reduction from the baseline prevalence (95% CI, -4.28% to -0.56%).”

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UHG Says Change Healthcare Will Start Processing Backlog Of Medical Claims After Cyberattack

Reuters reported, “UnitedHealth Group said on Friday its Change Healthcare unit will start to process the medical claims backlog of more than $14 billion as it resumes some software services disrupted by a cyberattack last month.” Change Healthcare “has been scrambling to resume services at the technology unit that was hit by a cyberattack on Feb. 21, disrupting payments to U.S. doctors and healthcare facilities and forcing the U.S. government to launch a probe.”

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CDC Says US Measles Cases Up To 62 As Of Thursday

Reuters reported, “The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Friday the number of measles cases in the United States has increased to 62 as of Thursday, higher than the whole of last year.” The agency “issued a health advisory on Monday urging people, particularly children and international travelers, to get vaccinated against measles due to the increase in cases this year.” The total number of cases was at 58 the week before. “Most cases reported this year have been among children aged 12 months and older who had not received the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine.”

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Wyoming To Bar Minors From Receiving Gender Transition Care

The New York Times (3/22, Harmon) reported, “Wyoming will bar minors from receiving medical treatments for gender transition, after the state’s Republican governor signed a bill on Friday that penalizes health care professionals who provide puberty blockers, hormone therapy and surgeries to those under 18.” With the legislation, “Wyoming joins 23 other states that have passed partial or total bans on gender-affirming care in recent years.”

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AI Chatbots Pitched As A Way To Address Mental Health Crisis Among Teens, But Regulation, Data On Effectiveness Still Lacking

The AP (3/23, Perrone) reported that “hundreds of free apps…are being pitched to address a crisis in mental health among teens and young adults.” The FDA does not regulate them “because they don’t explicitly claim to diagnose or treat medical conditions,” but “this hands-off approach is coming under new scrutiny with the startling advances of chatbots powered by generative AI.” The industry’s “argument is simple: Chatbots are free, available 24/7 and don’t come with the stigma that keeps some people away from therapy.” However, there are “limited data that they actually improve mental health.”

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Cardiorespiratory Fitness Lower Among Children With T2D Than Those Without Diabetes, Study Finds

Endocrinology Advisor (3/22, Kuhns) reported, “Cardiorespiratory fitness is lower among children with type 2 diabetes compared with those without diabetes, according to study results published in JAMA Network Open.” In the study, “among children with type 2 diabetes, mean peak oxygen consumption (V̇o2peak) was 20.7 mL/kg/min, which was 44.6% lower than control participants with healthy weight and without diabetes and 17.4% lower than weight-matched control participants.”

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Study Compares Scents Of Adolescents To Those Of Infants And Toddlers

The New York Times (3/21, Anthes) reports on “a small new study” that “compared the scents of adolescents to those of infants and toddlers.” Even though “there were many similarities between the chemicals wafting from teens and tots, the differences tended to favor the younger children, whose body odor samples had higher levels of a compound with a flowery fragrance.” On the other hand, adolescents “produced a compound that smelled like sweat and urine and had higher levels of substances described as smelling cheesy, musty and ‘goatlike.’” The study was published in Communications Chemistry.

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Exposure To Fine Particulate Matter, Nitrogen Oxide During First Three Years Of Life Tied To Increased Asthma Incidence, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (3/21, Stong) reports, “Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and nitrogen oxide (NO2) exposure during the first 3 years of life are associated with an increased incidence of asthma by early and middle childhood, according to a study in JAMA Network Open.” In the study, “an increase in 1 interquartile range (IQR) in mean NO2 (6.1 μg/m3) in the first 3 years of life was associated with a higher asthma incidence in the first 4 years of life (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% CI, 1.03-1.52) and through the first 11 years (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.04-1.44).” Additionally, “in the same 3-year average, a 1-IQR increase in mean PM2.5 (3.4 μg/m3) was associated with a higher incidence of asthma in children younger than 5 years (HR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.04-1.66) and those younger than 12 years (HR, 1.23; 95% CI, 1.01-1.507).”

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Lawmakers Reveal $1.2T Budget To Avert Federal Shutdown

The AP (3/21, Freking) reports, “Lawmakers introduced a $1.2 trillion spending package Thursday that sets the stage for avoiding a partial government shutdown for several key federal agencies this weekend and allows Congress, nearly six months into the budget year, to complete its work funding the government through September.” The proposal “includes about $886 billion for the Defense Department, a more than 3% increase from last year’s levels. The 1,012-page bill also funds the departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Labor, and others.” The bill also includes “a $120 million increase in funding for cancer research and a $100 million increase for Alzheimer’s research.” Bloomberg Law (3/21, Ruoff, Subscription Publication) reports, “The National Institutes of Health would get a $300 million increase, and efforts to combat the spread of HIV in the US and abroad would continue to get funding.” The legislation “would give the Department of Health and Human Services $116.8 billion and the Department of Labor $13.4 billion.” Modern Healthcare reports the bill will provide “an additional $1.9 billion for community health centers, which got $4.3 billion in the first appropriations package.” Additional funding includes “$1.4 billion for health professions workforce development, $4.6 billion for substance use disorder prevention and treatment, $1.2 billion for maternal and child health programs,” and “$345 million for the Improving Maternal Health Initiative.”

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Lupus Racial Disparities Worse In Children’s Hospitals Serving More Black Patients, Study Finds

Healio (3/20, Cooper) reports, “Disparities in lupus ICU admission and renal outcomes between Black and white children are greater in children’s hospitals serving more Black patients, according to data published in Arthritis Care & Research.” In the study, “Black children with SLE had a greater risk for ICU admission vs. non-Hispanic white patients only at the 23 hospitals serving a larger proportion of Black children (OR = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.04-1.59).” Additionally, “Black children demonstrated 1.8-fold increased odds for adverse renal outcomes vs. non-Hispanic white children, regardless of any adjustments for Black or Hispanic patient composition.”

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CDC Data Show Around 108K Americans Died From Drug Overdose In 2022

The AP (3/21, Stobbe) reports, “Nearly 108,000 Americans died of drug overdoses in 2022, according to final federal figures released Thursday” by the CDC. Over the past 20 years, “the number of U.S. overdose deaths has risen almost every year and continued to break annual records – making it the worst overdose epidemic in American history.” The official tally “for 2022 was 107,941, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said, which is about 1% higher than the nearly 107,000 overdose deaths in 2021.”

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US Ranks 23rd In Annual World Happiness Report, Down From 15th Last Year

The Washington Post (3/20, Bisset) reports, “The United States fell from 15th in 2023 to 23rd in this year’s World Happiness Report, which was released Wednesday to mark the United Nations’ International Day of Happiness.” The US’ “results varied dramatically among different age groups, however, with young people under age 30 ranking 62nd out of 143 countries for happiness, while U.S. adults age 60 and above ranked 10th.” Overall, “the report found that happiness has decreased for all age groups in the United States, Canada, Australia and New Zealand since 2006 to 2010, with a particularly notable drop for young people – and young females recorded even lower scores than males. Youth happiness has also fallen in Western Europe, albeit less dramatically.”

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Officials Alarmed By Growing Number Of Measles Outbreaks In US

The New York Times (3/20, Mandavilli) reports, “Measles, a highly contagious but preventable disease, is resurging in pockets of the United States, a warning of the dangers of the strengthening anti-vaccine movement.” The CDC “has recorded more cases this year than the 58 tallied in all of 2023, although the agency is not expected to release exact numbers until Friday.” But “on Monday, the agency advised health care providers to ensure that unvaccinated patients, especially those traveling internationally, stay updated on their immunizations.” The virus “was eliminated in the United States in 2000,” but “a drop in vaccination rates, exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, has experts worried about a resurgence.”

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Study Finds Each Daily Eight-Ounce Serving Of Sugary Drinks During Boyhood Linked To 34% Increase In Insulin Resistance By Adolescence

HealthDay (3/20, Thompson, Miller) reports, “Boys who drink lots of sugary soda and fruit juice could be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes later in life, a new study has found.” Every “daily 8-ounce serving of sugary drinks during a boy’s childhood is associated with a 34% increase in insulin resistance by the time they are teens, researchers found.” The results were presented at an American Heart Association meeting.

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CPSC Says Water Beads Continue To Be A Serious Health Hazard For Young Children

NBC News (3/20, Mogg) reports, “After years of injury reports and safety advisories, water beads continue to be a serious and growing health hazard for young children, the Consumer Product Safety Commission said.” A child who swallows the beads can experience “gastrointestinal blockages,” as these “absorbent polymer beads” can “grow to the size of a marble or even a golf ball when immersed in water.” The agency “recorded nearly 7,000 water bead-related ingestion injuries in emergency rooms between 2018 and 2022.”

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Approximately 1 In 10 US Children Ages 5 To 17 Has Been Diagnosed With ADHD, Data Indicate

HealthDay (3/20, Mundell, Miller) reports that approximately “1 in every 10 U.S. children ages 5 to 17 has been diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to” data from the National Center for Health Statistics. These “data from the National Health Interview Survey covers the years 2020 through 2022 and came from in-person or phone interviews involving a representative sample of American homes.” The survey “found that 11.3% of school-age children have been diagnosed with ADHD, with boys more likely to have this diagnosis (14.5%) than girls (8%).” These findings were published as an NCHS Data Brief.

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Cybersecurity Experts Urge Healthcare Organizations To Invest More Resources Into Data Protection After Change Healthcare Attack

Modern Healthcare reports that after the ongoing Change Healthcare cyberattack, “cybersecurity professionals are sounding the alarm on future attacks if healthcare organizations don’t start putting more financial resources into protecting their data.” Healthcare organizations invest “an average of 8.1% of their total IT budget on cybersecurity, according to a report from cybersecurity consultancy and research firm IANS Research and recruiting firm Artico Search published last September.” Just “the retail sector ranked lower in IANS’ analysis.”

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CDC Releases Guide For Hospital Leaders To Help Address Worker Mental Health, Burnout

Fierce Healthcare reports the CDC’s “campaign against healthcare worker burnout took a step forward this week with the release of a new instructional guide for executive-level hospital leaders.” The guide “outlines several steps that the agency said have been piloted across six CommonSpirit Health hospitals and developed in tandem with the Dr. Lorna Breen Heroes’ Foundation, a clinician wellness nonprofit.” It directs “executives on how to, among other actions, conduct a thorough review of existing hospital operations’ impact on workers’ wellbeing or build out a suite of communication tools between leaders and employees.”

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WHO Urges Children Receive Measles Vaccine Amid Rising Cases Globally

Reuters reports, “Vaccinating children who missed their measles shots during the COVID-19 pandemic is critical, a senior World Health Organization official said on Tuesday, as outbreaks of the infectious disease increase worldwide.” Over “50 countries have experienced ‘large and disruptive’ measles outbreaks in the last year, twice as many as in 2022, said Kate O’Brien, WHO director of immunization, at a virtual press conference.” O’Brien added, “It’s now a race between whether the catch-up activities can happen quickly enough or whether the outbreaks will continue to scale.” Similarly, the US CDC on Monday “also urged people to get vaccinated against measles amid rising cases globally.”

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Transitioning From ICU-Only HFNC Protocol To Weight-Based Non-ICU HFNC Protocol Was Associated With Reduced ICU Admission Rates For Hospitalized Children With Bronchiolitis, Study Finds

MedPage Today (3/19, Short) reports, “Transitioning from an intensive care unit (ICU)-only high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) protocol to a weight-based non-ICU HFNC protocol was associated with reduced ICU admission rates for hospitalized children with bronchiolitis, according to a retrospective cohort study.” In the “cohort of 18 children’s hospitals, transitioning to a weight-based HFNC protocol was associated with a 6.1% decrease per year in ICU admission, a 1.5% reduction per year in use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV), and a 2.5% immediate increase in NIPPV use compared with the ICU-only group.” The data indicated that “there were no differences in mean length of stay or the proportions of patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation between groups.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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USPSTF Rules There Is Insufficient Evidence Showing Benefits, Harms Of Primary Care Interventions To Prevent Child Maltreatment

Healio (3/19, Rhoades) reports, “There is insufficient evidence showing the harms and benefits of primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ruled in a final recommendation.” This final guidance “is consistent with the USPSTF’s 2023 draft recommendation, and applies only to youth who do not show signs or symptoms of neglect or abuse. The task force came to a similar conclusion in 2018.” In a press release, USPSTF member James Stevermer, MD, MSPH, said, “Unfortunately, when we looked at the research on how to prevent child abuse and neglect in those who do not show any signs or symptoms, there is still not enough evidence on what can be done in primary care to prevent maltreatment before it occurs. The task force continues to urgently call for more research in this area.”

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Disposable E-Cigarettes Associated With More Frequent Usage Among Teens, Young Adults Than Nondisposable Ones, Study Finds

Healio (3/19, Weldon) reports, “Among teenagers and young adults who use e-cigarettes, disposable products were associated with longer and more frequent use than nondisposable products, according to findings published in Pediatrics.” The study “revealed that 69% of participants used disposable e-cigarettes in the past month, while 31% used nondisposable types. Usage of vape pens was at 61.8%, rechargeable pod/cartridge systems at 42.2%, tank/mod systems at 24.6%, and other devices at 3.7%.”

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UHG Says It Has Advanced $2B In Payments To Providers Impacted By Change Healthcare Cyberattack

Reuters reports, “UnitedHealth Group said on Monday it has advanced payments of over $2 billion so far to provide assistance to healthcare providers, financially affected following a cybersecurity attack on its technology unit, Change Healthcare.” The insurer “said it will start releasing its medical claims software on Monday and it will become available to ‘thousands of customers’ over the next several days.” Change Healthcare “processes about 50% of medical claims in the United States for around 900,000 physicians, 33,000 pharmacies, 5,500 hospitals and 600 laboratories.” The AP (3/18) reports, “UnitedHealth is testing the last major system it must restore from last month’s Change Healthcare cyberattack, but it has no date yet for finishing the recovery.” The company “said Monday that it is testing software for submitting medical claims. It already has largely restored systems for handling pharmacy claims and processing payments.”

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FDA Approves Gene Therapy For Children With Metachromatic Leukodystrophy

Reuters reports the FDA “on Monday approved UK-based Orchard Therapeutics’ gene therapy to treat children with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), making it the first approved treatment in the United States for the rare, hereditary disease.” The drugmaker “said it will provide details on the pricing and availability of the therapy,” Lenmeldy (atidarsagene autotemcel), “later in the week. The one-time therapy…is approved for children in certain stages of disease progression…said” the agency.

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Rate Of RSV-Related ALRIs Is Disproportionately High Among Preterm Infants, Research Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (3/18, Goldberg) reports that investigators have found that “in preterm infants, the rate of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-related acute lower respiratory infections (ALRIs) is disproportionately high, with preterm infants making up 25% of infants with RSV-related hospitalizations.” Investigators came to these conclusions after conducting “a systematic review and meta-analysis for studies reporting RSV-associated mortality and morbidity estimates among children born prematurely who were less than 2 years of age.” The findings were published in The Lancet.

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Protein Secreted Into Airways May Be Sensitive Biomarker Of Both Mild Pulmonary Exacerbations And Treatment Response In Children With CF, Study Suggests

Cystic Fibrosis News Today (3/18, Bryson) reports, “A protein secreted into the airways, called SPLUNC1, may be a sensitive biomarker of both mild pulmonary exacerbations and treatment response in children with cystic fibrosis (CF), a study suggested.” The “data showed that SPLUNC1 levels in patients’ sputum were low during an exacerbation, then significantly rose after oral and, although less often needed, intravenous antibiotic treatment.” Additionally, “children with higher SPLUNC1 sputum levels following treatment…went without another exacerbation for longer periods than did those with lower levels.” The findings were published in the Journal of Cystic Fibrosis.

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CDC Officials Warn About Rising Measles Cases

CNN (3/18, Goodman) reports, “US health officials are warning doctors about the dramatic rise in measles cases around the world, and advising families traveling to a measles-affected country to get babies as young as 6 months vaccinated before they go.” On Monday, the CDC “issued a health alert to doctors…to increase awareness of the international spread of measles, and urged them to vaccinate infants a few months ahead of the typical schedule if families are planning to go abroad.” The agency “also warned about lagging vaccination rates in 36 US states where fewer than 95% of kindergarteners have been vaccinated against measles, putting them below the herd immunity threshold.”

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Tooth Agenesis May Be Associated With Higher Likelihood Of Several Different Cancer Types From Childhood Through Young Adulthood, Study Finds

Healio (3/15, Friedman) reported, “Individuals with tooth agenesis may be more likely to develop several different cancer types from childhood through young adulthood, according to” a study. This “population-based cohort study out of Denmark found higher rates of neuroblastoma, nephroblastoma, hepatoblastoma, osteosarcoma, colorectal carcinomas, carcinomas of the bladder, as well as other cancers, in individuals” with tooth agenesis “at various age ranges up to 40 years of age.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Once-Daily Topical Roflumilast Cream Effective In Treating Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis, Study Finds

MedPage Today (3/15, Bankhead) reported once-daily treatment with topical roflumilast cream “for small children with atopic dermatitis (AD) produced rapid improvement with good tolerability, a large randomized trial showed.” After four weeks, “one-fourth of patients achieved clinical success, defined as Investigator Global Assessment (IGA) 0/1 (clear/almost clear) and a 2-point improvement from baseline. More than a third of patients met the key secondary endpoint of IGA 0/1, and almost 40% of the patients had at least 75% improvement in the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI 75).” The results were presented at the 2024 American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting.

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Federal Government Urges States To Make Interim Payments To Providers Affected By Change Healthcare Cyberattack

Reuters reported, “The U.S. government said on Friday it has urged states to make interim payments to healthcare providers that were hit by the cyberattack at UnitedHealth’s unit Change Healthcare.” CMS’ “new guidance allows states to start making interim payments retroactively to the date when claims payment processing was disrupted due to the cybersecurity incident, the federal health agency said.” The agency “is reopening the system for some incentives given in cases of uncontrollable circumstances for healthcare providers affected by the hack.”

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Signs Of Depression Often Go Unnoticed In Boys, Experts Say

NBC News (3/17, Edwards) reports, “Teenage boys are drowning in just as much of the depression and anxiety that’s been well documented in girls,” and “experts warn that many young men struggling with their mental health are left undetected and without the help they need.” NBC News adds, “Depression in boys may go unnoticed…experts said, because boys usually don’t show it through signs of melancholy typically found in girls.”

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Children With ADHD Have Notably Different Brain Functioning When Resting Than Children Who Do Not Have The Disorder, Scan Study Finds

USA Today (3/16, Cuevas) reported, “Children with ADHD have notably different brain functioning when they’re resting than children who don’t have the neurological disorder, according to a…study.” USA Today added, “Scans of thousands of children with and without attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder highlighted a key difference: The National Institutes of Health study…found young people with ADHD had more wiring, or nerve cell networks, in their brains, making it harder for their brains to send clear signals about a task like following instructions or sitting still.” The findings were published in the American Journal of Psychiatry.

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Report Finds Chemicals In Plastics Far More Numerous Than Prior Estimates

Reuters says, “At least 3,000 more chemicals are in plastics – from food packaging to toys to medical devices – than previously estimated by environmental agencies, a report published on Thursday found, raising questions over pollution and consumer safety.” Around “a quarter of the identified chemicals lack basic information on their basic chemical identity, the report said.” Just “6% of the chemicals found in plastics are regulated internationally.”

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Researchers Say Study Drugs Like Adderall Could Provide Gateway To More Drug Use, Be Tied To Poorer Mental Health

HealthDay (3/14, Miller) reports, “College students who use drugs like Adderall to help them focus on their studies may be setting themselves up for trouble.” In a survey published in the International Journal of Psychological and Behavioral Sciences, researchers “asked 700 undergraduates across the United States about drugs commonly used by students – including ADHD medications like Adderall, cannabis, nicotine, alcohol, MDMA and ecstasy.” The researchers “found that using one substance appears to prime the brain for using others.” They also “linked use of one substance to generally poorer mental health and lower ability to fight off stress. And less frequent use led to mental distress – potentially promoting continued use.”

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Study Finds Teen Pregnancy Linked To Higher Mortality Risk In Adulthood

The New York Times (3/14, Caryn Rabin) reports a new study finds “women who were pregnant as teenagers are more likely to die before their 31st birthday.” This finding, published in JAMA Network Open, “was observed among women who had carried teen pregnancies to term, as well as among those who had miscarried.” Lead author on the study Joel G. Ray said, “The younger the person was when they became pregnant, the greater their risk was of premature death.” However, “the danger was substantially lower among women who had terminated a pregnancy as teenagers – however, they were still 40 percent more likely to die prematurely, compared with those who had not been pregnant.”

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African American Children Visited ED Because Of Asthma Or Food Allergy More Frequently Than White, Asian, And Hispanic Children, Study Finds

Healio (3/13, Hornick) reports, “Compared with white, Asian and Hispanic children, African American children more frequently visited the ED because of asthma or a food allergy, according to study findings.” Investigators came to this conclusion after assessing “173 children aged younger than 12 years with comorbid food allergy and asthma to determine if ED visits related to these conditions differ based on race/ethnicity.” The findings were presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting.

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HHS Creating Regulatory Structure To Oversee AI Use In Healthcare

Healthcare Dive (3/14, Pifer) reports, “Details are emerging on a new HHS task force faced with a monumental task: creating a regulatory structure to oversee utilization of artificial intelligence in healthcare.” Specifically, the task force has “working groups around core issues in AI: drugs and devices, research and discovery, critical infrastructure, biosecurity, public health, healthcare and human services, internal operations, and ethics and responsibility, the HHS AI head said.” These “working groups raise questions and bring suggestions to senior leadership on the task force, which meet monthly and provide guidance on how to proceed.”

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CDC Report Finds Cases Of MIS-C More Likely Among Children Unvaccinated Against COVID-19

ABC News (3/14, Kekatos) says, “Cases of MIS-C were still occurring in 2023 and children who are unvaccinated or have waning immunity from previous vaccination are at the highest risk of developing the condition, according to a new federal report published Thursday” in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The condition, “multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, is a rare but serious condition in which different body parts can become inflamed – such as the heart, lungs, brain and kidneys – and is often seen in children after they are diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” The report found “82.1% of the children with MIS-C were unvaccinated. Additionally, among the 20 patients who were vaccinated, 60% were more than 12 months out from their last dose of the vaccine.” Just “five children with MIS-C had received three or more doses.”

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Many Americans Still Feel Lingering Impact Of COVID-19 Pandemic Four Years Later

The New York Times (3/13, Bosman) reports, “For much of the United States, the pandemic is now firmly in the past, four years to the day that the Trump administration declared a national emergency as the virus spread uncontrollably.” However, “for many Americans, the pandemic’s effects are still a prominent part of their daily lives.” The Times interviewed people who “said that the changes are subtle but unmistakable: Their world feels a little smaller, with less socializing and fewer crowds. Parents who began to home-school their children never stopped.” And “many people are continuing to mourn relatives and spouses who died of Covid or of complications from the coronavirus.”

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Enzyme-Replacement Therapy May Slow Disease Progression, Improve Motor Function In Children With Pompe Disease, Research Finds

Healio (3/13, Herpen) reports, “Enzyme-replacement therapy may slow disease progression and improve motor function in children with Pompe disease, according to a poster from the 2024 Muscular Dystrophy Association Clinical & Scientific Conference.” Investigators came to this conclusion after analyzing “patient information for 19 children diagnosed with Pompe (63.1% boys) and admitted between March 2015 and March 2023, collecting demographic data, symptoms prior to diagnosis, age at diagnosis, time from diagnosis to treatment initiation and clinical outcomes.”

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Data Indicate GSK’s Abandoned Maternal RSV Vaccine Associated With Unexplained Higher Risk Of Preterm Birth

MedPage Today (3/13, Kahn) reports, “GSK’s abandoned maternal respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine protected infants from severe RSV, final results of a phase III trial indicated, but those positive outcomes came at the expense of an unexplained higher risk for preterm birth.” According to the data, “for newborns up to 6 months of age, efficacy with the RSV prefusion F protein-based vaccine (RSVPreF3-Mat) during pregnancy arrived at 65.5% (95% credible interval [CrI] 37.5-82.0) and 69% (95% CrI 33.0-87.6), respectively, against either any or severe RSV-associated lower respiratory tract disease, according to” researchers. However, “a 37% increased risk of preterm birth in the vaccination arm led the company to halt the trial in February 2022 and cease further development of the maternal vaccine, the researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.”

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Medium Inhaled Corticosteroid Dose Plus Long-Acting Beta Agonist Was Most Beneficial Step-Up Treatment Option For Children With Uncontrolled Asthma, Meta-Analysis Finds

Healio (3/13, Hornick) reports, “A medium inhaled corticosteroid dose plus a long-acting beta agonist was found to be the most beneficial step-up treatment option for children with uncontrolled asthma, according to a meta-analysis.” Investigators came to this conclusion after analyzing “results from 144 randomized controlled trials focusing on children/adolescents with uncontrolled asthma on ICS to determine the most beneficial treatment option,” looking specifically “at which of six treatment options — ICS (low/medium/high dose), ICS plus LABA, leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA), ICS plus LTRA, theophylline and placebo — lowered the risk for asthma exacerbations and improved asthma control.” The findings were published in European Respiratory Journal.

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Healthcare Hardest Hit By Ransomware Last Year, FBI Report Shows

HealthIT Security says, “The healthcare sector suffered more ransomware attacks than any other critical infrastructure sector last year, according to complaint data examined in the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s 2023 Internet Crime Report.” In 2023, the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3) “received a record 880,418 complaints, with losses exceeding $12.5 billion.” These numbers “signify a 10 percent increase in complaints received and a 22 percent increase in losses suffered compared to last year’s report.” The FBI “received 1,193 complaints from critical infrastructure organizations alone in 2023,” of which “249 of them were from healthcare.”

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Hundreds Possibly Exposed To Measles At California Hospital, Officials Say

The Los Angeles Times (3/12, Lin) reports, “Hundreds of people were possibly exposed to measles after a child with the virus was seen at a Northern California hospital, officials said.” Up to “300 people were exposed to the child, who was confirmed to have measles and evaluated at UC Davis Medical Center’s emergency department, according to health officials in Sacramento and El Dorado counties.” The incident “highlights growing concern about the reemergence of measles nationwide this year. Four cases have been reported in California.”

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Study Finds Children With Atopic Dermatitis May Be Shorter In Height, Higher In Weight, BMI

HCP Live (3/12, Kunzmann) reports, “Younger children with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis may experience hindered growth relative to peers their age, according to new findings from an ongoing international, observational study” presented at the 2024 American Academy of Dermatology Annual Meeting. The data “show that children with eczema have a lower mean height and higher mean weight and body mass index (BMI) than study’s reference healthy population.”

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Treatment With Nusinersen Was Linked To Increased Motor Function, Reduction Of Neurofilament Light Chain In Children With Spinal Muscular Atrophy, Study Finds

Healio (3/12, Herpen) reports, “Treatment with nusinersen was linked to increased motor function and reduction of the neurodegenerative biomarker neurofilament light chain in children with spinal muscular atrophy, according to interim results of a study.” The findings were presented “in a poster at the 2024 Muscular Dystrophy Association Clinical & Scientific Conference.”

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Study Finds 11.4% Of High School Seniors Report Using Delta-8 THC Products

CNN (3/12, Christensen) reports, “High school seniors’ use of delta-8, a cannabis compound that’s sometimes marketed as ‘light THC’ or a legal alternative to weed, is ‘appreciable,’ according to a new study, particularly in states that don’t have a legal weed option for adults.” In the study, 11.4% of high school seniors “said they had used delta-8 THC in the past year, and even though weed is illegal for teens, 30.4% of the participants reported using it.” And among those “who reported that had they used delta-8 in the previous year, 68.1% used it at least three times, 35.4% had used it at least 10 times, and nearly 17% used it at least 40 times. Close to 91% of the delta-8 users also reported using weed.” NBC News (3/12, Syal) reports, “The new study found that delta-8 use by high school seniors was higher in the South and the Midwest and in states where recreational marijuana isn’t legal.” It “was also more likely to be used in states where there are no regulations on its use.” Currently, delta-8 “is banned or severely restricted in 24 states and Washington, D.C., according to CBD Oracle, a cannabis consumer research company.” The study was published in JAMA.

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Researchers Say AI Shows Promise In Diagnostics, Management In Pediatric Care

Healio (3/11, Weldon) reports, “Artificial intelligence, or AI, has shown potential in diagnostics and management in pediatric care, according to a review of the technology published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research.” In the review, researchers also “acknowledged the ‘regulatory, implementation and ethical challenges’ in bringing AI to pediatric care. Specifically, they mentioned the need to train ‘unbiased AI algorithms’ on large data sets that are representative of the pediatric population.”

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Treating HCV Earlier In Children May Boost Lifetime Health Outcomes, Lower Healthcare Costs, Study Finds

MedPage Today (3/11, Robertson) reports, “Treating hepatitis C virus (HCV) earlier in kids was associated with better lifetime clinical outcomes and lower healthcare costs compared with deferring treatment, a modeling study showed.” In the study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, “projected life expectancy was longest when treatment started at age 3 (78.36 life years) and decreased with treatment deferral to age 6 (76.10), age 12 (75.99) and age 18 (75.46), reported” researchers.

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Infant Swings Sold At Walmart, Other Retailers Recalled Due To Suffocation Hazard

The New York Times (3/11, Diaz) reports a manufacturer of baby products called Jool Baby has recalled approximately 63,000 infant swings “that were sold at Walmart stores and online because they posed a suffocation risk, federal safety regulators said.” The Consumer Product Safety Commission announced Thursday that the Jool Baby Nova Baby Infant Swing posed a suffocation rise to infants because it was set at an incline angle of more than 10 degrees. The products impacted by the recall “were sold at Walmart stores and the Jool Baby website, and online at shopping sites including Amazon, Babylist and Target, from November 2022 through November 2023 for about $150, the commission said.”

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Cost To American Families Of Caring For Child With Mental Health Condition Rose By Nearly A Third Between 2017 And 2021, Report Finds

According to HealthDay (3/11, Mundell), a report has found that “the cost to American families of caring for a child with a mental health condition rose by almost a third between 2017 and 2021…to an average $4,361 per year.” Altogether, “American families spent an estimated $31 billion in 2021 on child mental health services, which now make up nearly half (about 47%) of all child medical spending, the report found.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Children With Mental Health Issues Have More Difficulty Recovering From Concussion, Study Finds

HealthDay (3/11, Thompson) reports that a study found that children “struggling with mental health” issues have more difficulty “recovering from a concussion.” Investigators found that these children “tend to have more emotional symptoms after concussion and take longer to fully recover.” The study found that “the more mental health diagnoses a child had, the worse their emotional symptoms and the longer their recovery following a concussion.” The findings were published in Sports Health.

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Report Details Teenagers’ Relationship With Smartphones, Social Media

The AP (3/11, Ortutay) says, “Nearly three-quarters of U.S. teens say they feel happy or peaceful when they don’t have their phones with them, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center.” In the survey, “Pew also found that despite the positive associations with going phone-free, most teens have not limited their phone or social media use.” Additionally, “majorities of teens say smartphones make it a little or a lot easier for people their age to pursue hobbies and interests (69%) and be creative (65%). Close to half (45%) say these devices have made it easier for youth to do well in school.” CNN (3/11, Duffy) says, “Around 40% of teenagers say they have cut back on their time on social media, according to” the report. Around “the same proportion of teens acknowledge that they spend ‘too much’ time on their smartphones (38%) and social media (27%).” The Washington Post (3/11, Kelly) reports, “Almost half of teenagers say their parents at least sometimes get distracted by their phones during conversations, according to” the survey, but just “31 percent of parents said this is something they do.”

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US On Track To Surpass Last Year’s Total Measles Cases, CDC Says

The Hill (3/8, Choi) reported, “The rash of measles outbreaks around the country has sparked concerns that the U.S. risks losing its status as a country where the disease has been eliminated, a distinction held since 2000.” The number of cases across the country stood at 41 as of two weeks ago, “according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That puts the nation already on track to surpassing the 58 total cases that were detected in 2023.”

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People Are Six Times More Likely To Become Obese In Middle Age If Both Parents Had Obesity, Study Finds

HealthDay (3/8, Thompson) reported, “People are six times more likely to become obese in middle age if both their parents [had obesity] during that time of their lives, according to research to be presented at the European Congress on Obesity in May.” Additionally, “having just one obese parent more than triples a person’s odds of middle-aged obesity, researchers found.”

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Infants Born Premature Who Received Platelet Transfusion May Have Higher Risk For Mortality Or Severe Neurodevelopmental Impairment At Age 2, Study Finds

Neurology Advisor (3/8, Nye) reported, “Infants born premature who received platelet transfusion may be at increased risk for mortality or severe neurodevelopmental impairment…at age 2, according to findings of an observational cohort study” in which investigators “evaluated data from the Preterm Erythropoietin Neuroprotection Trial.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Over 100 Children Have Died From Flu This Year, CDC Says

NBC News (3/9, Edwards) said, “More than 100 children have died of the flu this season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday.” Although not a seasonal record, “the latest CDC numbers provide a stark reminder that flu can indeed be devastating to any child,” as “more than half of the children who died (53%) had no medical issues before their influenza infection…said” CDC Domestic Influenza Surveillance Team Head Alicia Budd.

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Children’s Obesity Risk Influenced By Changes In Maternal BMI, Study Finds

Healio (3/8, Rhoades) reported, “Changes in maternal BMI significantly influenced the likelihood of obesity in children, a recent study showed.” In the study, “researchers found that children born to mothers with obesity both before and after pregnancy had a 146% increased likelihood of obesity vs. children born to mothers without obesity.” Additionally, “children born to mothers with overweight both before and after pregnancy had a 53% increased likelihood of obesity.” The results were published by Epic Research.

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High Risk For Asthma In Children Was Associated With Increased Levels Of Fine Particulate Matter, Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure In First 3 Years Of Life, Study Finds

Healio (3/7, Hornick) reports, “A high risk for asthma in children was linked to increased levels of fine particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide exposure in the first 3 years of life, according to” a study. Investigators came to this conclusion after assessing “5,279 children…in the U.S. to determine how fine particulate matter…and nitrogen dioxide exposure during the first 3 years of life impact the risk for asthma in early childhood.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Around 11,000 Children Went To ED Between 2019 And 2022 After Taking Melatonin Unsupervised, CDC Says

CNN (3/7, Musa) reports, “Melatonin products have become increasingly popular among US adults and a new report from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says about 11,000 children have landed in” the emergency department (ED) “in recent years after ingesting it while unsupervised.” In the report, the CDC “estimated that 10,930 emergency department visits occurred” between 2019 and 2022, “accounting for about 7% of all [ED] visits in the US for unsupervised medication exposures in infants and young children.”

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Teenagers, Young Adults Increasingly Seeking Help For Mental Health Issues

The New York Times (3/7, Richtel) reports, “Increasingly, doctor visits by adolescents and young adults involve mental health diagnoses, along with the prescription of psychiatric medications.” A new study published in JAMA Network Open “found that in 2019, 17 percent of outpatient doctor visits for patients ages 13 to 24 in the United States involved a behavioral or mental health condition, including anxiety, depression, suicidal ideation, self-harm or other issues.” That result was up “sharply from 2006, when just 9 percent of doctor’s visits involved psychiatric illnesses.” Additionally, “in 2019, 22.4 percent of outpatient visits by the 13-24 age group involved the prescription of at least one psychiatric drug, up from 13 percent in 2006.”

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Girls Are Reportedly Starting Puberty Earlier Than Ever Before, And Researchers Are Not Sure Why

STAT (3/7, Lee, Subscription Publication) reports, “Girls across the globe are hitting puberty earlier than ever before,” and “researchers aren’t sure why.” According to STAT, “Girls who undergo precocious puberty are also more likely to be victims of bullying during childhood, and they have a higher risk of depression, social anxiety, eating disorders, and substance misuse.” Additionally, “recent research has also demonstrated that precocious puberty has mental health effects that persist into adulthood, with young adults who went through early puberty more likely to experience depressive symptoms than those who matured at an average age.”

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CDC Says RSV Antibody Was 90% Effective At Preventing Hospitalizations Among Children This Season

STAT (3/7, Branswell, Subscription Publication) reports Beyfortus, a new monoclonal antibody “to protect against respiratory syncytial virus was 90% effective at preventing little children from being hospitalized with RSV, according to new data from the first season it was in use.” Researchers behind “the new study noted the median length of follow-up in these children was 45 days,” and “cautioned the effectiveness of Beyfortus would likely decline over the course of an entire RSV season because the antibodies it contains degrade over time.” The CDC published the data in MMWR. Reuters reports, “The data is the first real-world evidence of effectiveness of the therapy, nirsevimab, in protecting infants against RSV-related hospitalization in their first season of potential exposure to the virus.”

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More Time In Optimal Glucose Range At 12 Weeks Lowers Adverse Pregnancy Outcome Risks For Patients With T1D, Study Finds

Healio (3/6, Welsh) says that among pregnant patients “with type 1 diabetes, more time in optimal glucose range at 12 weeks gestation was associated with lower risks for preeclampsia and large for gestational age infants, researchers reported.” The study found “every 5-unit time in range increase at 12 weeks gestation was associated with a 45% reduced risk for preeclampsia and a 46% reduced risk for large for gestational age infants in adjusted analyses.” The results were published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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High Levels Of Benzene Detected In Benzoyl Peroxide Acne Treatments, Valisure Says

Reuters reports, “High levels of cancer-causing chemical benzene were detected in some acne treatments from brands including Estee Lauder’s Clinique, Target’s Up & Up and Reckitt Benckiser-owned Clearasil, said independent U.S. laboratory Valisure.” The chemical “could form at ‘unacceptably high levels’ in both prescription and over-the-counter benzoyl peroxide acne treatment products, Valisure said.” HCP Live (3/6, Smith) reports that as a result of these findings, Valisure, “an autonomous quality assurance organization,” has decided “to file their 8th US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Citizen Petition. The announcement noted that benzoyl peroxide acne treatment products may be fundamentally unstable and their formation of benzene is concerning, given conditional FDA limits.”

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Children With Sleep-Disordered Breathing Who Live In Less Advantageous Neighborhoods May Have High Symptom Burden, Poor QOL, Study Finds

Healio (3/6, Hornick) reports, “Children with sleep-disordered breathing who live in less advantageous neighborhoods may have high symptom burden and poor quality of life, according to” a study. Investigators came to this conclusion after assessing more than 450 children with mild sleep-disordered breathing. The findings were published in Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Many American Indian Adolescents, Young Adults Have Dyslipidemia, Research Finds

Healio (3/6, Swain) reports, “In a cohort of American Indian individuals, more than 70% of young adults and more than 50% of adolescents had dyslipidemia, and some had subclinical or clinical heart disease, according to new” research. Investigators came to this conclusion after analyzing data on “1,440 participants from the NIH-funded Strong Heart Study of families from 12 American Indian communities.” The findings were published in the American Heart Association.

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Pediatric Atopic Dermatitis Tied To Higher Risks Of Learning, Memory Difficulties, Study Finds

MedPage Today (3/6, Kneisel) reports, “Pediatric atopic dermatitis was associated with increased risks of learning and memory difficulties, especially in kids with comorbid neurodevelopmental disorders, a cross-sectional study suggested.” According to “a weighted sample of over 69 million children, those with atopic dermatitis were more likely to experience learning difficulties compared with kids without the condition (10.8% vs 5.9%, P<0.001), along with memory difficulties (11.1% vs 5.8%, P<0.001), reported” researchers in JAMA Dermatology.

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Government-Run Efforts To Distribute Free COVID-19 Tests, Nirmatrelvir/Ritonavir Set To End Friday

CBS News (3/5, Tin) reports, “Two government-run efforts to distribute free COVID-19 tests and to offer free courses of Pfizer’s Paxlovid [nirmatrelvir/ritonavir] antiviral are set to end Friday, as trends of the virus have largely slowed.” The government “will stop accepting orders to ship COVID-19 tests to all households through the U.S. Postal Service, an agency spokesperson confirmed, marking an end to this season’s round of shipments.” Meanwhile, “all pandemic-era supplies of Paxlovid are also scheduled to stop being dispensed by pharmacies Friday, following a decision earlier this year by the Food and Drug Administration to wrap up the transition of Pfizer’s COVID-19 treatment into the private market.”

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Food Stamps, Trouble Affording Medication Was Linked To Poor Disease Control Among Children With Asthma, Study Finds

Healio (3/5, Hornick) reports, “Among children with asthma, poor disease control was linked to receipt of food stamps and trouble affording medication, according to” research. However, the study found “no significant link between asthma control and insurance type (private or government), the inability to afford a primary care visit or the inability to afford an asthma specialist visit.” The findings were presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting.

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Apremilast Improves Moderate-To-Severe Pediatric Plaque Psoriasis In The Short-Term, Study Finds

Dermatology Advisor (3/5, Goldberg) reports, “Treatment with apremilast was associated with reduced psoriasis severity and improved skin involvement in the short-term among pediatric patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, according to study findings published in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.” The study found that “regardless of disease severity and baseline age or weight, patients who received apremilast vs placebo had higher sPGA (33.1% vs 11.5%; P <.0001), PASI-75 (45.4% vs 16.1%; P <.0001), and PASI-90 (25.2% vs 4.9%; P =.0001) response rates, respectively.”

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US School Shootings Have Become More Deadly Since 1997, Study Finds

Healio (3/5, Weldon) reports, “Mass shootings on school campuses in the United States have become more deadly over the last 25 years, according to a study published in Pediatrics.” Overall, during that time frame “there were 1,453 school shootings. During the most recent 5 school years, there was a substantially higher number of school shootings than the prior 15 years combined, at a total of 794 shootings between 2017 and 2022.” Additionally, “there were an average of 7.6 fatalities in five school mass shooting[s] from 1997-1998 to 2011-2012 compared with 14 in six school mass shootings from 2012-2013 to 2021-2022.”

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Physician-Related Medication Error Rates Similar Between Phone, Video Telehealth Consults, Study Finds

mHealth Intelligence reports, “There were no significant differences in physician-related medication errors between consultations for critically ill children conducted via telephone or video-based telehealth, according to new research published in JAMA Network Open.” The study “further states that children are three to four times more likely than adults to experience a medication error during an emergency department (ED) visit.”

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Heightened Current Exposure To Fine Particulate Matter, Nitrogen Dioxide Each Negatively Affected Lung Function In School-Aged Children Born Preterm, Study Finds

Healio (3/4, Hornick) reports, “Among school-aged children born preterm, heightened current exposure to fine particulate matter and nitrogen dioxide each negatively impacted lung function, according to” a study. Researchers also found that “this patient population had lower lung function with high levels of exposure to particulate matter between 2.5 µm and 10 µm in diameter (PM10) at birth.” The findings were published in Thorax.

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General Anesthesia Exposure In Pregnancy Raises Risk Of Behavioral Issues In Children, Study Suggests

HealthDay (3/4, Thompson) reports, “Children exposed to anesthesia in the womb when their pregnant mom has surgery are more likely to suffer from behavioral issues later, a new study finds.” General anesthesia exposure “before birth was associated with a 31% increased risk of diagnosis with a behavioral disorder as a child, researchers reported” in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. And “the risk was even higher when exposure occurred in the second or third trimester, the researchers said.”

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Accelerated Early Growth, Weight Gain Predict Earlier Onset Of Puberty Among Girls, Study Finds

Endocrinology Advisor (3/4, Kurek) reports, “Accelerated early growth and weight gain lead to greater serum androgen levels and earlier onset of puberty among girls, according to study findings published in the Journal of the Endocrine Society.” In the study, “compared with girls with average birth size and average postnatal growth, girls with accelerated postnatal growth had earlier biochemical adrenarche (serum DHEAS concentration ≥1 µmol/L). Serum DHEA and DHEAS concentrations were highest among girls aged from 6 to 9 years and 9 to 11 years with increased postnatal growth.”

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Toddlers Exposed To More Screen Time Have Fewer Conversations With Caregivers, Study Finds

The New York Times (3/4, Baumgaertner) reports, “Toddlers who are exposed to more screen time have fewer conversations with their parents or caregivers by an array of measures. They say less, hear less and have fewer back-and-forth exchanges with adults compared with children who spend less time in front of screens.” These results, “published on Monday in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, make up one of the first sets of longitudinal evidence to confirm an intuitive reality: Screens are not just linked to higher rates of obesity, depression and hyperactivity among children; they also curb face-to-face interactions at home – with long-term implications that could be worrisome.”

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WHO Study Finds More Than 1B People Worldwide Are Considered Obese

Reuters (3/1, Rigby) reported, “More than a billion people globally are now considered obese, a condition linked to an increased risk of numerous serious health problems, according to updated estimates from the World Health Organization and an international group of researchers.” The findings, published in The Lancet, “are based on data from more than 220 million people in more than 190 countries.” The Hill (3/1, Irwin) reported, “Obesity has more than quadrupled among children and adolescents since 1990. Among all adults, 43 percent were overweight in 2022, the study found.”

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CDC Shortens Isolation Period For People With COVID-19

The New York Times (3/1, Mandavilli) reported, “Americans with Covid or other respiratory infections need not isolate for five days before returning to work or school, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Friday, a striking sign of changing attitudes toward the coronavirus.” Now, “people with respiratory illnesses may resume daily activities if they have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without the aid of medications and if their symptoms are improving, agency officials said.” The AP (3/1, Stobbe) reported the change comes as “most people have some degree of immunity to the coronavirus from vaccinations or from infections. And many people are not following the five-day isolation guidance anyway, some experts say.” Reuters reported “the guidelines had not been updated since December 2021, when the” CDC “had shortened the recommended isolation time for Americans with asymptomatic cases to five days from 10 days.”

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Measles Cases In Over A Dozen States Concern Officials

CNN (3/1, Cheng, Howard, Musa, Hassan) reported the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded at least 41 cases of measles in 16 states since the beginning of 2024, with officials viewing the increases with alarm “as the number of measles cases recorded across the US in the first two months of 2024 nears the total number – 58 – recorded all of last year.” As of last year, “about 92% of US children have gotten the MMR vaccine by age 2” nationwide, “below the federal target of 95%.”

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Viral Videos Of Young People Using Zyn Nicotine Pouches Sparks Debate Among Politicians, Parents, Health Experts

The AP (3/1, Perrone) reported, “There’s nothing complicated about the latest tobacco product trending online: Zyn is a tiny pouch filled with nicotine and flavoring.” However, “it has stoked a debate among politicians, parents and pundits that reflects an increasingly complex landscape in which Big Tobacco companies aggressively push alternative products while experts wrestle with their potential benefits and risks.” Although it is marketed to adult users, “videos of young people popping the pouches have racked up millions of views on TikTok and other social media platforms.”

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Vaping, Skipping Breakfast Tied To Higher Risk Of Headaches For Teens, Study Finds

HealthDay (3/1, Thompson) reported, “Vaping and skipped meals appear to be the main causes of frequent headaches among teens, a new study says.” Published in Neurology, the study found that “overall, regular meals reduced risk of frequent headaches by 8%, researchers report. Researchers also found that teens who use e-cigarettes daily have twice the odds of frequent headaches than those who’ve never vaped.”

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Indoor Allergen Exposure To Pests Like Mice And Cockroaches Was Linked To Occurrence Of Upper Respiratory Infections Among Kids With Asthma, Study Finds

MedPage Today (2/29, Short) reports, “Among kids with asthma, indoor allergen exposure to pests like mice and cockroaches was associated with occurrence of upper respiratory infections…according to a longitudinal study.” Researchers found that “among 90 mostly Black kids sensitized to allergens, mouse allergen concentration was associated with URI with reduced lung function…as was cockroach allergen concentration.” The findings were presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology annual meeting.

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Home Insulin Pump Use Safe Among Hospitalized Children With T1D, Study Finds

Endocrinology Advisor (2/29, Maitlall) reports, “Home insulin pump use in a hospital setting, compared with hospital-supplied pumps and subcutaneous injections, is safe among children, according to study findings published in JAMA Network Open.” In the study, however, “hyperglycemia was less frequent among patients using hospital pumps (15.7%) compared with those using home pumps (27.0%) or receiving subcutaneous injections (45.2%). Moderate and severe hypoglycemia events occurred among 3.1% and 0.8% of hospital pump users, 4.5% and 1.5% of home pump users, and 5.1% and 1.1% of injection recipients, respectively.”

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Recent Changes To Medicaid Leave Many Americans Of Color Uninsured

CNBC (2/29, Washington) reports, “Recent changes to Medicaid programs, aimed at closing a health coverage gap in the U.S., have left behind some Americans – particularly people of color.” According to a KFF report, as of 2022, “10% of Black Americans were uninsured, compared with 6.6% of white Americans,” and “Black people were 1.5 times more likely to be uninsured than their white peers.” Additionally, “people who identified as American Indian or Alaskan Native were 2.9 times more likely than their white counterparts to be uninsured, while Hispanic Americans were 2.7 times more likely to be uninsured.” Experts identified states not expanding Medicaid under the ACA as a top driver of the racial coverage gap. The article adds that following the end of the pandemic emergency, “at least 17.4 million people were disenrolled from Medicaid or the related Children’s Health Insurance Program coverage.”

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Vision Tests May Help With Early Diagnosis Of Autism In Children, Study Suggests

HealthDay (2/29, Mundell) reports that vision tests may help with “the early diagnosis of autism in children, a new study finds.” Researchers “pinpointed a gene that affects how kids’ eyes react when they turn their heads.” Usually, “people use…the vestibulo-ocular reflex to help their sight coordinate with their head movement,” but children “with autism appear to have a gene that puts this reflex into overdrive, and the change can be picked up on vision tests.” The findings were published in Neuron.

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Care Team “Huddles” Reduced Physical Restraint Events At Children’s Hospital, Study Finds

Healio (2/29, Weldon) reports, “Coordinated ‘huddles’ with care teams reduced physical restraint events in one children’s hospital’s medical behavioral health unit, according to study findings published in Pediatrics.” In the study, researchers “studied a cohort of 527 consecutive patients hospitalized in the MBU between January 2021 and January 2023. In that time, a baseline mean of 14 weekly physical restraint events per 100 MBU patient-days in 2021 decreased to 10 per 100 patient-days during the intervention period from January through July 2022, and to a low of 4.1 in August, which was sustained through December.”

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FDA Says Companies Will Phase Out Use Of PFAS Chemicals In Food Packaging

The Washington Post (2/28, Amenabar) reports, “The Food and Drug Administration announced Wednesday that companies are voluntarily phasing out the use of ‘forever chemicals’ in food packaging, including fast-food wrappers, microwave popcorn bags and takeout containers that are grease, oil and water-resistant.” Corporations “told the FDA it could take 18 months to ‘exhaust the market supply from the last date of sale’ of these products, though it is unclear when that would be.” CNN (2/28, Goodman) reports, “PFAS have been linked to a variety of health effects including changes in immune and liver function, obesity, diabetes, certain cancers and lower birth weights.” And although “health and environmental advocates cheered the new announcement, they noted that companies were already facing pressure from state bans to get PFAS out of consumer products, including food packaging.”

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Annual Flu Shots Between 40% To 60% Effective In Preventing Patients From Needing To See Physician, CDC Says

The AP (2/28, Stobbe) reports, “Early estimates suggest flu shots are performing OK in the current U.S. winter flu season.” This year’s vaccines “were around 40% effective in preventing adults from getting sick enough from the flu that they had to go to a doctor’s office, clinic or hospital, health officials said during a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention vaccines meeting Wednesday.” Additionally, “children who were vaccinated were roughly 60% less likely to get treatment at a doctor’s office or hospital, CDC officials said.”

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Study Suggests Babies Born To Mothers Who Experience Profound Grief During Pregnancy May Be Vulnerable To Heart Failure Much Later In Life

HealthDay (2/28, Saxena) reports, “Babies born to mothers who experience profound grief during pregnancy may be vulnerable to heart failure much later in life,” according to researchers who “analyzed information on the maternal loss of close family members and subsequent heart failure diagnoses in the children by middle age.” Published in the journal JACC: Heart Failure, the research shows that “during the follow-up period (the median period was just over 24 years), more than 4,800 offspring were diagnosed with heart failure.”

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Increased Levels Of Subcutaneous, Visceral Fat Mass At Age 13 Associated With Reduced Lung Function In Adolescents Independent Of Adiposity, BMI Measures At Age 10, Research Shows

Pulmonology Advisor (2/28, Stong) reports, “Increased levels of subcutaneous and visceral fat mass at age 13 years are associated with reduced lung function in these adolescents, independent of their adiposity and body mass index (BMI) measures at 10 years of age,” researchers concluded in “a population-based cohort study using data from 2877 children 13 years of age who were included in the Generation R Study in the Netherlands.” Researchers reported in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology that the “findings suggest that reducing abdominal fat mass in specific compartments in adolescents may be an effective strategy for improving respiratory health.”

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CDC Recommends Physicians Use Tdap Vaccine Against Tetanus After Manufacturer Announces Decision To Discontinue Production Of Td Vaccine

CBS News (2/28, Tin) reports, “The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging doctors to conserve shots of a kind of tetanus vaccine, as the agency braces for a potential shortage of those shots this year.” Physicians “should switch from using the so-called Td vaccine – the immunization that protects against both tetanus and diphtheria infections – to giving the broader Tdap vaccine instead whenever possible, the CDC now says.” This vaccine “also offers protection against pertussis, the infection also known as ‘whooping cough.’” The recommendation “stems from a decision by nonprofit vaccinemaker MassBiologics to discontinue production of its Td vaccine, branded as TdVax.”

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Seventh Measles Case Confirmed In Broward County Elementary School

ABC News (2/27, Kekatos) reports, “The seventh case of measles linked to an outbreak at a Florida elementary school was confirmed by Health officials Tuesday.” Broward County Public Schools superintendent Dr. Peter Licata “said in an update on Tuesday that no other schools in the district have been impacted by measles cases.” As of now, “Florida has a total of 10 confirmed measles cases with nine confirmed in Broward County and one confirmed in Polk County, according to the Florida Department of Health.”

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Treatment With Ustekinumab For Inflammatory Bowel Disease Did Not Increase Risk For Adverse Maternal Or Fetal Pregnancy Outcomes, Research Finds

Healio (2/26, Burba) reports, “Treatment with Stelara” (ustekinumab) “for inflammatory bowel disease did not increase the risk for adverse maternal or fetal pregnancy outcomes, and infants exposed in utero reached developmental milestones in the first year of life, data showed.” The study included “76 pregnant women from 19 hospitals in Denmark and the Netherlands who were treated with Stelara (ustekinumab, Janssen) for IBD from 2018 to 2022.” The findings were published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

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Placental Oxygenation Levels May Be Associated With Fetal Brain Development, MRI Study Finds

HealthImaging (2/27, Van Alstin) reports, “A new study into fetal growth shows a predictor of healthy brain development is placenta oxygen levels, which researchers measured using MRI.” The study indicated that “oxygenation levels not only seem to be a predictor of cortical growth and cognition, but likely childhood behavior as well.” The research was published in JAMA Network Open.

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The Rate Of Antidepressants Prescribed To Young People Surged During The Pandemic, Study Finds

NPR (2/27, Archie) reports, “The monthly rate of antidepressants being dispensed to young people increased about 64% more quickly during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics.” The IQVIA Longitudinal Prescription Database was used by researchers “to examine a sample of about 221 million prescriptions written for millions of Americans between the ages 12 to 25, and from 2016 to 2022.” Researchers “separated the data into before and after March 2020, when the pandemic started.”

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California Reportedly Lagging In Healthcare For Children Despite Coverage

The Los Angeles Times (2/26, Gold) reports that even though 97% of children in California have health insurance, the state ranks 46th out of all 50 states and the District of Columbia for providing preventive care for kids under five, according to a federal government survey. Moreover, a majority of the state’s youngest residents rely on Medi-Cal, criticized in two consecutive audits for failing to hold insurance plans accountable for necessary preventive care.

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Study Suggests Children Of Mothers With Epilepsy Who Used ASMs During Pregnancy Were More Likely To Develop Epilepsy

MedPage Today (2/26, Henderson) reports “children of mothers with epilepsy who used valproate or other antiseizure medications (ASMs) during pregnancy were more likely to develop epilepsy as well,” a cohort study in JAMA Network Open “suggested, although causality was questionable.” Children of mothers who used valproate during pregnancy, in comparison to children of mothers who had epilepsy but did not use ASMs during pregnancy, “were more than twice as likely to develop epilepsy whether it had been used as monotherapy (adjusted HR 2.18, 95% CI 1.70-2.79) or in combination with other drugs (aHR 2.10, 95% CI 1.49-2.96), reported Julie Werenberg Dreier, PhD, of Aarhus University in Denmark, and colleagues.” Epilepsy risk “associated with prenatal valproate exposure was not dose-dependent, but epilepsy risk was highest with in utero exposure to higher doses of topiramate (aHR 4.88 at ≥150 mg/day, 95% CI 2.47-9.62) and clonazepam (aHR 3.66 at ≥4 mg/day, 95% CI 1.48-9.05) in the limited number of children whose mothers took those drugs during pregnancy.”

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West Virginia Bill Would Allow Religious Exemptions From Childhood Vaccines For School Attendance

The AP (2/26, Raby) reports West Virginia is potentially set to join 45 other states “that allow religious exemptions from childhood vaccines required for school attendance under a bill that passed the House of Delegates on Monday.” The exemption “is included in a bill that would let private schools decide whether to implement vaccine mandates” as an amendment last week. The overall bill “was approved Monday on a 57-41 vote and now goes to the state Senate, where its chances of passage are uncertain.” Some medical experts in the state have “called the bill archaic.” Dr. Steven Eshenaur, the health officer for the Kanawha-Charleston health department, said, “Legislators want to turn the clock back nearly 100 years and remove some of the safeguards in our vaccination policies. … Our children are more important than any agenda that would bring these horrific diseases back to the Mountain State.”

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Prior COVID-19 Infection Does Not Affect Allergic Asthma Severity In Children, Research Finds

Healio (2/26, Hornick) reports, “Among children with allergic asthma, disease severity between those with vs. without a COVID-19 infection in 2020 was similar when assessed after 3 years, according to” a study. Investigators came to this conclusion after comparing “19 children…diagnosed with COVID-19 in 2020 with 114 children…who did not contract COVID-19 to determine if this infection negatively impacts this patient population after 3 years.” The findings were presented at the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting.

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Report Finds Younger Children Increasingly Using Listening Devices Daily, Risking Hearing Damage

HealthDay (2/26, Thompson) reports, “Many younger children could be permanently damaging their hearing by blasting loud music on their earbuds and headphones, a new report finds.” Specifically, “two in three parents say that their child between the ages of 5 and 12 regularly pop listening devices in their ears, according to the University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health.” Half of parents whose children use listening devices “say their kids spend at least an hour a day with them, while one in six say a typical day includes at least two hours of use, poll results show.” Medical experts have warned that parents should limit the use of listening devices for children in order to reduce noise exposure and hearing damage.

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Early Eczema Onset Linked To Greater Number Of Food Allergies In Children, Research Suggests

Healio (2/23, Rhoades) reported, “Early onset of eczema was associated with a greater number of food allergies in children, and the condition also increased the risk for asthma, according to research.” The study found “that eczema onset before 4 months was associated with a higher number of food allergies…compared with eczema onset after 12 months.” The findings were presented at the AAAAI Annual Meeting.

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Norovirus Cases On The Rise In US, CDC Data Show

CNN (2/24, Sealy) reported “cases of norovirus are on the rise in the US, on par with seasonal trends, according to the most recent data from the” CDC. In the week that ended “February 17, more than 12% of tests for norovirus…came back positive, CDC data showed.” That figure is “up from 11.5% the week before.” Cases are especially “high in the Northeast, where more than 13% of tests came back positive.” Still, “these levels are below what they were at this point last season, when about 15% of tests were positive, both nationally and in the Northeast.” NBC News (2/23, Planas) reported, “Western states have been hit the second-hardest – the area saw a three-week positivity rate of 12% as of Saturday.”

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Rates Of New-Onset T1D Among Children Dropped To Pre-Pandemic Levels In 2022, Analysis Finds

Healio (2/23, Monostra) reported, “Rates of new-onset type 1 diabetes [T1D] among children fell back to pre-pandemic levels in 2022 after sharply increasing in 2021, according to a population-wide analysis of data from Scotland.” The researchers said, “The sharp increase in type 1 diabetes incidence seen in 2021 was restricted to children aged 6 to 14 years and did not persist into 2022.” The findings were published in Diabetes Care.

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ED-Related Visits For Mycoplasma Pneumoniae In Children Rebounded In Fall 2023, Analysis Finds

MedPage Today (2/23, Kahn) reported, “In the fall of 2023, emergency department (ED)-related visits for Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children rebounded somewhat from a lull during the COVID-19 pandemic, but the numbers were still not as high as before the pandemic, according to an analysis of CDC data.” The analysis found “the percentage of M. pneumoniae diagnoses among pneumonia-related ED visits fell from 1.15% before the pandemic to just 0.35% during the pandemic, and then increased to 0.89% in the post-pandemic period.” The findings were published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Almost 90% Of Perinatal, Neonatal Clinical Trials Report Incomplete Primary Outcome Data, Review Finds

Healio (2/23, Weldon) reported, “Nearly 90% of perinatal and neonatal clinical trials report incomplete primary outcome data, according to the findings of a review.” The research “found that 89% of the trials had incomplete primary outcome data and 12% did not address their missing outcome data at all.” The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Food-Focused Toddlers May Have Greater Risk Of Developing Eating Disorder Once They Enter Adolescence, Study Shows

HealthDay (2/23, Thompson) reported, “Toddlers who are really into their food might have a higher risk of developing an eating disorder once they enter adolescence, a new study shows.” The research found “kids ages 4 and 5 with a strong urge to eat when teased with tasty food appear more likely to report a range of eating disorder symptoms by ages 12 to 14.” The findings were published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

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Omalizumab Lowers Risk Of Life-Threatening Reactions In Kids With Severe Food Allergies After Exposure To Trace Amounts Of Certain Foods, Research Suggests

The New York Times (2/25, Rabin) reports Xolair (omalizumab), “a drug that has been used for decades to treat allergic asthma and hives, significantly reduced the risk of life-threatening reactions in children with severe food allergies who were exposed to trace amounts of peanuts, cashews, milk and eggs, researchers reported on Sunday.” Although “some hailed Xolair’s approval as a breakthrough, experts cautioned that it was far from a perfect solution.” The drug reduces “the risk of a reaction to trace amounts of an allergen, but life-threatening episodes are still possible.” Patients must still “scrupulously avoid foods likely to trigger a reaction.” The findings were published in The New England Journal of Medicine and presented at the annual conference of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. Reuters (2/25, Lapid) reports, “Following treatment, 67% of participants who received omalizumab could consume the equivalent of about four peanuts without experiencing moderate to severe allergic reactions, compared to only 7% of patients who received a placebo.” About “44% of those treated with the medicine could consume the equivalent of about 25 peanuts, researchers reported.” These “patterns were similar when patients were challenged with the other foods.” NBC News (2/25, Sullivan, Martin, Sridhar) reports, “By the end of the initial four-month period, about 80% of people who got the drug were able to eat small amounts of one of the foods they were allergic to without triggering their normal reaction.”

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Parents Enjoy Idea Of Offering Kids Vegetables During Breakfast, Study Finds

Pharmacy Times (2/22, Hunter) reports, “Parents enjoy the idea of offering children vegetables at breakfast time, according to information gathered from parents who shared their experiences.” In the study, “three themes emerged from these interviews: willingness to feed children vegetables at breakfast time, barriers to eating this way, and facilitators to promote vegetable consumption at breakfast.” The findings were published in Appetite.

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Norovirus Spreading Across Northeastern US, CDC Data Show

The Hill (2/22, Irwin) reports norovirus “is spreading across the Northeast region of the United States, according to” CDC data. The agency’s data show “the three-week average positive tests for norovirus in the region reached 13.9 percent in recent weeks and held above a 10 percent positive rate since the middle of December 2023.” Although “the northeast region is experiencing a high number of positive norovirus cases, CDC data show that other regions are seeing positive tests in recent weeks too.” The data show “the South has 9.5 percent, the Midwest has hovered around 10 percent and the West has about 12 percent.”

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Adolescents Who Have Increase In Fat Mass More Likely To Have Worse Insulin Resistance As Young Adults, Study Finds

Healio (2/22, Monostra) reports, “Adolescents who have an increase in fat mass are more likely to have worse insulin resistance as young adults, according to study findings.” The research found that “after adjusting for covariates, each 1 kg increase in total fat mass and trunk fat mass, and each 1 kg/m² increase in BMI from age 15 to age 24 years increased the likelihood for hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and elevated insulin resistance.” The findings were published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Embryo Culture Duration Tied To Likelihood Of LGA Infants Among Individuals Undergoing Frozen Embryo Transfer, Study Suggests

Endocrinology Advisor (2/22, Nye) reports, “Duration of embryo culture is related to the likelihood of having a large for gestational age (LGA) infant among individuals undergoing frozen embryo transfer, according to study results.” LGA risk “was also associated with maternal BMI of greater than 35 kg/m2…30 to 34.9 kg/m2…and 25 to 29.9 kg/m2…compared with BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 kg/m2.” The findings were published in Fertility and Sterility.

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TV, Other Media May Stunt Children’s Language Development, Study Suggests

HealthDay (2/22, Thompson) reports “a new study argues TV or other media could stunt a child’s language development.” Kids “plopped in front of videos for hours on end tend to use phrases and sentences with fewer words, researchers reported.” The study also showed “that toddlers spend an average of nearly two hours a day watching videos.” The findings were published in Acta Paediatrica.

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Florida Surgeon General Fails To Urge Parents To Keep Unvaccinated Children Home From School Amid Measles Outbreak

The Washington Post (2/22, Weber, Sun) reports Florida Surgeon General Joseph A. Ladapo “failed to urge parents to vaccinate their children or keep unvaccinated students home from school as a precaution in a letter to parents at the Fort Lauderdale-area school this week following six confirmed measles cases.” Rather than recommending “that parents keep unvaccinated children home for up to 21 days – the incubation period for measles – Ladapo said the state health department ‘is deferring to parents or guardians to make decisions about school attendance.’” Also reporting is STAT (2/22, Branswell, Subscription Publication).

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US Pharmacies Struggling To Get Prescriptions To Patients Following UnitedHealth Unit Cyberattack

CNN (2/22, Goldman) reports, “Pharmacies across the United States are reporting that they are having difficulty getting prescriptions to patients because of a cyberattack on a unit of UnitedHealth.” On Thursday, “the company said in a regulatory filing…its Change Healthcare business, which processes prescriptions to insurance for tens of thousands of pharmacies nationwide, was compromised by hackers who gained access to some of its systems.” The company found out about “the cyberattack Wednesday, and, in a separate statement, said it expected the attack to last at least throughout the day Thursday.” The cyberattack blocked “some pharmacies from processing prescriptions to insurance companies to receive payment.” The Wall Street Journal reports the American Hospital Association called on medical facilities to disconnect from Optum following the cyberattack. Change Healthcare offers prescription processing services through Optum. HealthIT Security reports Change Healthcare said, “Once we became aware of the outside threat, in the interest of protecting our partners and patients, we took immediate action to disconnect our systems to prevent further impact.” Also reporting are Modern Healthcare and Health Exec (2/22, Godt).

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FDA Gives Rare Pediatric Disease Designation To DMD Therapy

Healio (2/21) reports the FDA has granted rare pediatric disease designation to AOC 1044, an investigational therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). According to Avidity Biosciences, the therapy is currently being evaluated in a Phase 1/2 trial. The FDA based its designation on positive trial results reported in December 2023. Avidity plans to share initial data on AOC 1044 in the latter half of 2024.

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Use Of Low-Dose Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy Improves Motor Function In Children With Rett Syndrome, Study Finds

Rett Syndrome News (2/21, Lobo) reports, “The use of low-dose extracorporeal shock wave therapy – a safe and noninvasive treatment known as ESWT – for three months was found to improve motor function in children with Rett syndrome.” In addition, “reduced muscle stiffness, known as spasticity, also was seen among the children, but the benefits were not statistically significant.” The study, published in the Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, “involved six girls with Rett syndrome among more than 20 children treated with extracorporeal, or outside-the-body shock wave therapy.”

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Nearly Half Of US Infants Have Received RSV Vaccine, CDC Data Show

PharmaNewsIntelligence (2/21, Salib) reports, “Last week, the CDC updated data on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine uptake in the United States, revealing that almost half of infants in the US have been vaccinated.” According to the CDC “data, 40.5% of infants under eight months have received the RSV vaccine as of January 2024.” The data also show that “21.7% of parents reported that they would get their infants vaccinated.”

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Research Supports Use Of Adalimumab Monotherapy As First-Line Biologic In Children With Crohn’s Disease

Gastroenterology Advisor (2/21, Khaja) reports, “Adalimumab monotherapy is the recommended first-line biologic treatment for children with” Crohn’s disease (CD), but “if infliximab is selected, combination therapy is preferable to monotherapy, according to study results.” In the “observational nationwide study using Israeli Inflammatory Bowel Disease…research nucleus…cohort data, researchers compared the durability of adalimumab and infliximab as the initial biologic in pediatric-onset CD and assessed durability in combination with immunomodulators or as monotherapy.” The research was published in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases.

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Clean Energy Investments Could Help Prevent Nearly 3 Million Asthma Attacks Among Children, Report Says

CNN (2/21, Christensen) reports, “Hundreds of infants’ lives would be saved and millions of children would breathe easier across the US if the nation’s power grid depended on clean energy and more drivers made the switch to zero-emission vehicles, according to a new report from the American Lung Association.” This report “determined that children’s lives could be made a lot healthier if all new car shoppers picked zero-emission options by 2035 and people bought only zero-emission medium- and heavy-duty vehicles like buses, ambulances and tractor-trailers by 2040, along with a switch of the nation’s electric grid to clean and renewable energy by 2035.” According to The Hill (2/21, Irwin), “From 2020 to 2050, the report found, clean energy investments could prevent up to 2.79 million pediatric asthma attacks, 147,000 pediatric acute bronchitis cases, more than 4 million respiratory symptoms and more than 500 infant mortality cases.” Also covering the story are ABC News (2/21, Kekatos) and HealthDay (2/21, Mundell).

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Florida Is Latest US State To Report Measles Outbreak

USA Today (2/20, Kokal, Cuevas, McCloud) reports, “A measles outbreak at a Florida elementary school is the latest in a string of flare-ups in nearly a dozen states around the country as U.S. health officials continue to warn about rising cases of the preventable infection.” Broward County Health Department officials “have confirmed at least six cases of measles.” Almost “a dozen states have identified cases since December, with outbreaks seen in Washington state, Pennsylvania and now Florida.”

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Difficulty Among Caregivers In Administering OTC Acetaminophen And Ibuprofen Liquid Products To Children Increases Risk Of Improper Dosing, Study Finds

Pharmacy Times (2/20, Welch) reports previous “study results indicate that more than 40% of caregivers make dosing errors when administering liquid medications to children.” And “poorly designed dosing instruments (eg, oral syringes, dosing cups, and droppers) coupled with health literacy challenges increase the risk of improper dosing.” A study “published in Exploratory Research in Clinical and Social Pharmacy validated this relationship” after sampling “14 pediatric OTC acetaminophen and ibuprofen liquid products for package readability, consistency between recommended dosing and oral syringe markings, and value of supplemental online resources.”

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Among Children With Intellectual And Developmental Disabilities, Black Youth, Females Face Greater Risk Of Being Placed In Foster Care, Study Finds

HCPlive (2/20, Derman) reports, “Among children with intellectual and developmental disabilities, Black youth and females faced a greater risk of being put in the foster care system – and the risk increased with age – according to a new study.” Researchers “conducted a cross-sectional study of youth (≤ 21 years old) with intellectual and developmental disabilities in foster care to assess the rates of children based on race, ethnicity, age, and sex.” The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Most Cases Of SUID Had Multiple Unsafe Sleep Factors Present Regardless Of Sleep Location, Researchers Say

MedPage Today (2/20, Henderson) says, “Most cases of sudden unexplained infant death (SUID), regardless of sleep location, had multiple unsafe sleep factors present, researchers found.” Among “7,595 cases of SUID, 59.5% were sleep surface sharing when the infants died, and at least 76% had multiple unsafe sleep factors present, reported” the researchers in Pediatrics. The article adds, “Sleep surface sharing infants had a larger number of other unsafe sleep factors, and nearly one-third had all three unsafe sleep factors (soft or loose bedding or objects; not being in a crib; and prone or side position) as compared with 21% of non-sharing infants.”

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Researchers Identify Genetic Biomarker For Predicting Perforated Appendicitis In Children Presenting With Suspected Appendicitis

MedPage Today (2/20, Haelle) reports, “Machine learning enabled researchers to identify a genetic biomarker for predicting perforated appendicitis in children presenting with suspected appendicitis, according to a single-center prospective exploratory diagnostic study.” MedPage Today adds, “Whole-blood transcriptomic analysis in 71 children revealed a four-gene signature that predicted perforated appendicitis over simple appendicitis with 85.7% accuracy.” Meanwhile, “a smaller testing set used for internal validation resulted in 72.7% accuracy, with high sensitivity – all perforated appendicitis cases were identified as such – but lower specificity.” The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Global Resurgence Of Measles Increasing Risk Of More Serious Complications, Deaths, Experts Say

NBC News (2/18, Szabo) reported, “The massive resurgence of measles around the world – attributed to pandemic-related declines in immunizations and rising rates of vaccine hesitancy among parents – raises the risk of more serious complications and deaths, said Dr. James Cherry, a professor of pediatrics and an infectious disease expert at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.” The disease “is so contagious that even one case is considered an outbreak. Each measles patient infects an average of 12 to 18 people who lack immunity from vaccines or natural infection.”

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FDA Approves Use Of Omalizumab For Severe Food Allergies

CNN (2/16, Musa) reported that on Friday, the FDA “approved a medication called Xolair [omalizumab] to help lessen the severity of an accidental allergic reaction in people who are allergic to multiple foods.” The article added, “Repeated use of the medication can help reduce the risk of allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis, in certain adults and children as young as 1 year following accidental exposure to foods such as peanuts, milk, egg, and wheat, according to a news release from the FDA.” The drug “was originally approved in 2003 for the treatment of moderate to severe persistent allergic asthma in certain patients.”

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Microalbuminuria, Functional Iron Deficiency Independently Associated With Hearing Loss And High-Frequency Hearing Loss Among Adolescents, Research Finds

HCPlive (2/16, Iapoce) reported, “Microalbuminuria and functional iron deficiency were independently associated with hearing loss and high-frequency hearing loss among adolescent patients aged 10–19 years old, according to new research.” However, researchers “identified no association between hearing loss and laboratory findings, including impaired estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), hypertension, diabetes, anemia, obesity, serum triglyceride, or serum total cholesterol.” For the study published in The Laryngoscope, “participants were chosen from the 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2011 to 2012.”

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More Than One-Third Of Children Aged 9 To 17 Received One Or More HPV Vaccine Doses As Of 2022, CDC Report Finds

Healio (2/16, Weldon) said 38.6% “of children aged 9 to 17 years in the United States had received one or more HPV vaccines doses as of 2022, according to a new CDC report.” Researchers wrote in the National Center for Health Statistics brief, “This report uses parent-reported data from the 2022 National Health Interview Survey to describe the percentage of children ages 9 to 17 years who received at least one dose of the HPV vaccine by selected sociodemographic and health characteristics.”

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No Patterns Of Opioid Misuse Identified Among Opioid-Naive Children With Sickle Cell Disease Prescribed The Drugs For An Acute Pain Episode, Study Finds

MedPage Today (2/19, Bassett) reports, “No patterns of long-term or increasing use of opioids were identified within 3 years among opioid-naive children with sickle cell disease (SCD) who were prescribed the drugs for an acute pain episode, according to a retrospective cohort study.” In the study, “mean days’ supply of opioids over 3 years was 30, despite 45.5% of patients having a least one vaso-occlusive crisis, reported” investigators “in a research letter in JAMA Pediatrics. The correlation between number of vaso-occlusive crises and days’ supply was r=0.58.”

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Growing Number Of Youths Being Prescribed Multiple Psychiatric Drugs Simultaneously, Study Finds

The New York Times (2/16, Richtel) reported “growing numbers of children and adolescents are being prescribed multiple psychiatric drugs to take simultaneously, according to a” study published in a research letter in JAMA Network Open that “looked at the prescribing patterns among patients 17 or younger enrolled in Medicaid in Maryland from 2015 to 2020.” The study “found that in 2015, 4.2 percent of Medicaid enrollees under the age of 17 in Maryland had overlapping prescriptions of three or more different classes of psychiatric medications.” The “figure rose to 4.6 percent in 2020.” The data reveal that psychotropic polypharmacy “‘was significantly more likely among youths who were disabled or in foster care,’ the new study noted.”

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CDC Considering Whether To Recommend Spring COVID-19 Booster Shot For People At High Risk For Severe Illness

NBC News (2/15, Edwards) reports the CDC “is considering whether to recommend yet another Covid booster shot this spring, especially for people most at risk for severe complications of the illness.” A spring shot “would be the same vaccine that was approved last fall, which was formulated to target the XBB.1.5 subvariant” but “is also very effective against the JN.1 subvariant, which is causing almost all Covid infections in the U.S. right now.” Although “it’s unlikely that the majority of Americans would opt for another dose – just 21.9% of adults received the latest version of the vaccine – experts say that it’s critical to make it available sooner rather than later.”

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Global Prevalence Of Pediatric Rheumatic Heart Disease Increased Over The Past 30 Years, Study Finds

Rheumatology Advisor (2/15, Kuhns) reports, “The global incidence and prevalence of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) in children aged less than 15 years increased from 1990 to 2019, while disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and mortality rates decreased, according to study findings published in the International Journal of Cardiology.” According to the study, “globally, the number of incident cases of pediatric RHD increased by 41.9% and prevalent cases increased by 40.9% from 1990 to 2019. The age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR) per 100,000 children increased from 42.19 in 1990 to 52.33 in 2019, corresponding to an average annual percentage change (AAPC) of 0.75%.”

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Certain Markers Of Inflammation In Lungs Of Children With CF Can Help Predict How Bronchiectasis Will Worsen Over Time, Study Suggests

Cystic Fibrosis News Today (2/15, Maia) reports, “Certain markers of inflammation found deep in the lungs of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) can help predict how bronchiectasis will worsen over time, offering insights for better treatment and care, a study suggests.” The research found that “among other markers, higher levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8), a signaling protein, were best at predicting whether bronchiectasis, an abnormal thickening of the airways walls, would progress within two years.” The findings were published in the Journal of Cystic Fibrosis.

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Height And Weight Can Be Accurately Measured Remotely For Children With Obesity, Report Says

Healio (2/15, Monostra) reports, “Height and weight measurements collected through videoconferencing are highly correlated with in-person measurements and support the use of remote assessment of BMI for children with obesity, according to a brief report.” Published in Obesity, the study found that, “according to two one-sided t tests, the in-person and remote height measurements were equivalent (P = .006). The absolute error value was 3.51 cm, and three of the 37 participants had errors beyond the 95% limits of agreement. The in-person and remote height measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.991; P < .0001).”

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CDC Warns At Least 128 Pregnant Women Received Wrong RSV Vaccine

The New York Times (2/14, Mandavilli) reports, “This winter, for the first time ever, there were two vaccines available to ward off” RSV, but “only one of them – Abrysvo, made by Pfizer – was approved for pregnant women, and neither was for young children.” That “distinction apparently slipped by some clinicians and pharmacists. At least 128 pregnant women were mistakenly given the alternative vaccine – Arexvy, by GSK – and at least 25 children under age 2 received a vaccination, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned.”

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Vegetarian Diets During Pregnancy Linked To Reduced Risks For Atopic Dermatitis In Children, Study Finds

Healio (2/14, Gawel) reports, “Vegetarian diets during pregnancy were associated with reduced risks for atopic dermatitis among children, according to a study published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.” In the study, “rates of parental-reported AD among infants before age 18 months included 13.3% for the nonvegetarian group and 8.8% for the vegetarian group. Rates also included 9.2% for the lacto-ovo vegetarian group and 7.8% for the vegan group.”

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Asthma Was More Prevalent Among Adolescents Who Used Cannabis In Previous 30 Days, Study Finds

Healio (2/14, Gawel) reports, “Asthma was more prevalent among adolescents who used cannabis in the previous 30 days compared with those who had not used it, according to a study.” That “prevalence also increased with greater cannabis use, although a definitive dose-response relationship could not be determined.” The findings were published in Pediatric Pulmonology.

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National Youth Tobacco Survey Shows E-Cigarette Use Among Middle Schoolers On The Rise

In a video on its website, ABC News (2/14) reports, “Statistics are staggering. Experts warn e-cigarette use is rising, with half a million young students saying they vape.” According to the latest National Youth Tobacco Survey, e-cigarettes “were the most popular tobacco product for kids under 18. And though there was a significant decline in tobacco product use for high school students, the data show an alarming increase among middle schoolers.”

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Being Bullied In Childhood More Than Triples Likelihood Of Later Mental Health Problems, Study Finds

HealthDay (2/14, Miller) reports, “When bullies destroy a young victim’s trust, mental health problems are likely to follow them into adulthood, a new study warns.” Investigators “looked at data from 10,000 children in the U.K. who were followed for nearly 20 years.” The “researchers found that kids who were bullied at age 11 and then became distrustful by age 14 were roughly 3.5 times more likely to have mental health problems by age 17 than those who were more trusting.” The research was published in Nature Mental Health.

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Returning To School Early, Limiting Screen Time Helps Teens Improve Recovery Time From Concussion, Study Finds

HealthDay (2/14, Miller) reports, “A mental workout can speed teens’ recovery from a concussion, especially if it takes place in the classroom.” New research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine “shows that returning to school early after a concussion and limiting screen time help symptoms resolve sooner.” The study found that, on average, “kids returned to school about one week after a concussion. When that was delayed, symptoms lasted longer. Club activities were linked to faster recovery.”

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CDC Expected To Abandon Five-Day Isolation Guidance For People Who Test Positive For COVID-19

The Washington Post (2/13, Sun) reports, “Americans who test positive for the coronavirus no longer need to routinely stay home from work and school for five days under new guidance planned by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” Instead, the CDC “is loosening its covid isolation recommendations for the first time since 2021 to align it with guidance on how to avoid transmitting flu and RSV.” The New York Times (2/13, Mandavilli) reports this means Americans could “return to their routines if they have been fever free for at least 24 hours without medication.” The same standard applies to the influenza and respiratory syncytial viruses. CNN (2/13, Gumbrecht) reports, “The science around Covid-19 transmission hasn’t changed, but experts broadly agreed…that easing isolation timeframes won’t significantly increase community transmission or severe outcomes – in part because the virus has been circulating at very high levels, even with more restrictive guidance in place.” Reuters (2/13, Shah, Sunny) reports, “The government has yet to sign off on the guidelines the agency is expected to release in April for public feedback, the report added.”

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Food-Induced Anaphylaxis Before Age 3 Is Associated With Higher Likelihood Of Developing Eating And Sleeping Disorders That Could Persist Into Adulthood, Study Finds

Healio (2/13, Gawel) reports, “Children who experienced food-induced anaphylaxis before age 3 years had greater odds for developing eating and sleeping disorders that could persist into adulthood, according to a study.” Investigators came to this conclusion after examining “data from a matched pediatric cohort of 545 children (39.6% girls) with food-induced anaphylaxis…and” more than 4,500 “controls treated by the Clalit health care organization between 2001 and 2021.” The findings were published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

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Adolescents With Higher Fat Mass And Abdominal Fat Distribution Have Increased Risk For Airway Obstruction, Worse Small Airway Function Than Adolescents With Higher Lean Mass During Childhood, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (2/13, Stong) reports, “Adolescents with higher fat mass and abdominal fat distribution have an increased risk for airway obstruction and worse small airway function than adolescents with higher lean mass during childhood, according to study findings.” Researchers came to this conclusion after assessing “children aged 6 to 13 years to identify critical periods for body composition changes affecting adolescent lung function and respiratory outcomes.” The research was published in Thorax.

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Children Experiencing Residential Move Due To Eviction, Foreclosure Also Likely To Lose Access To Safety Net Programs, Study Finds

Healio (2/13, Weldon) says, “Children who experienced a residential move because of unaffordable rents, evictions or foreclosures were also likely to lose access to safety net programs, researchers reported in Pediatrics.” According to the study, “21% of the children experienced a coverage gap for at least one social safety net program – 75% of these participants had disrupted access to WIC, 20% had disrupted access to SNAP and 16% had disrupted access to Medicaid.”

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Studies Examine Prevalence Of Long COVID In Pregnant People, Children

CNN (2/12, Christensen) reports, “Millions of people deal with Covid-19 symptoms long after their initial infections. Two new studies – one looking at pregnant people and the other on children – give a better look at the burden from this health problem that doctors say often goes under the radar.” One study “says that 1 in 10 people who had Covid when they were pregnant will develop long-term symptoms. The results were shared Monday at the” Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine Annual Pregnancy Meeting. The other study, “published last week in the journal Pediatrics, looked at a variety of studies on children and found that up to 6 million have developed long Covid.”

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FDA Approves First Oral Treatment For Eosinophilic Esophagitis

Reuters (2/12, Roy) reports, “Takeda Pharmaceutical’s therapy for an allergic inflammation of the esophagus has received approval from the U.S. FDA, the Japanese drugmaker said on Monday, capping a years-long regulatory process.” The FDA’s “approval makes the therapy the first oral treatment for the condition.” The treatment, “to be sold as Eohilia [budesonide], will be used to treat eosinophilic esophagitis for 12 weeks in children above 11 years and adults.”

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Greater BMI Increase From Ages 1 Through 6 In Boys With CF Tied To Early Adrenarche, Study Suggests

Cystic Fibrosis News Today (2/12, Lobo) reports “a greater increase in body mass index (BMI)…from ages 1 through 6 in boys with cystic fibrosis (CF) results in the early production of sex hormones, called adrenarche, according to a small study.” The research found “boys with early adrenarche had an accelerated bone age, which may affect their final height.” The findings were published in Pediatric Pulmonology.

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Amoxicillin Remains Effective Against Acute Otitis Media, Study Finds

Healio (2/12, Weldon) reports, “Amoxicillin remains effective against acute otitis media, according to the results of a small study published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.” In the study, after five days, “74.1% of children experienced improvement in their symptoms, 47.3% had symptomatic resolution and 27.3% reported adverse drug events. Conversely, 5.4% experienced treatment failure and 6.8% had a recurrence.”

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Iron Deficiency More Common In Non-Breast-Milk-Fed Very Preterm Infants, Study Finds

HCP Live (2/12, Iapoce) reports, “A new retrospective cohort study found iron deficiency was significantly more prevalent among non-breast-milk-fed very premature infants (<31 weeks gestational age) at 4-6 months corrected age (CA), despite a higher iron intake than breast-milk-fed infants.” In the study, published in Nutrients, “infants in the non-breast-milk-fed cohort had higher mean daily formula intake and received more iron from formula than breast-milk-fed infants. However, a higher percentage of breast milk-fed infants were taking supplements (79.4% vs. 57.9%) and received more iron on average from supplements.”

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EDs That Saw Fewer Kids Were More Likely To Have Potentially Delayed Diagnoses For Serious Acute Conditions, Study Finds

MedPage Today (2/12, Henderson) reports, “Emergency departments (EDs) that saw fewer kids were more likely to have potentially delayed diagnoses for serious acute conditions in that population, a large retrospective cohort study showed.” Among “pediatric patients, the overall risk of possible delayed diagnosis – having an ED discharge within the 7 days prior to diagnosis – dropped by 26.7% for every two-fold increase in annual pediatric volume at the ED where they were seen, reported” researchers in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Maternal Cortisol Levels Tied To Adverse Birth Outcomes, Study Finds

Drug Topics (2/9, Krewson) reported, “Maternal cortisol levels may be associated with adverse birth outcomes, according to a recent study published in Psychoneuroendocrinology.” In the study, “unpredicted birth complications (UBCs) were reported in 24.5% of participants. Composite stress, anxiety, and depression (SAD) scores were significantly increased among patients with UBCs 2 months after birth, though a decline was observed by 6 months.”

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GLP-1RAs Effective For Reducing Weight, Improving Sugar Control Among Children With Obesity, Study Finds

Endocrinology Advisor (2/9, Nye) reported, “Glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP-1RAs) are effective for reducing weight and improving sugar control among children with obesity, according to study findings published in Obesity Reviews.” In the study, “compared with placebo, the intervention groups had weighted mean reductions in: Weight; BMI; and, Waist circumference.”

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Up To Almost 30% Of Teens, Adults With CF In US Have Smoked Marijuana And/Or CBD, Survey Finds

Cystic Fibrosis News Today (2/9, Inacio) reported, “Up to almost 30% of teenagers and adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) in the U.S. have smoked marijuana and/or cannabidiol (CBD), one of the active components of cannabis, according to an online survey.” The data indicated that “use of e-cigarettes and traditional cigarettes was just as common among them.” The findings were published in Pediatric Pulmonology.

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Flu Season Intensifying In Some Parts Of US, CDC Data Shows

The AP (2/9, Stobbe) reported, “The flu virus is hanging on in the U.S., intensifying in some areas of the country after weeks of an apparent national decline.” Data released by the CDC on Friday “showed a continued national drop in flu hospitalizations, but other indicators were up – including the number of states with high or very high levels for respiratory illnesses.” Notably, “patient traffic has eased a bit in the Southeast and parts of the West Coast, but flu-like illnesses seem to be proliferating in the Midwest and have even rebounded a bit in some places.”

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Adolescents With More Abdominal Fat Depots Compared With Their Peers Have Reduced Lung Function, Study Finds

Healio (2/8, Gawel) reports, “Adolescents with greater amounts of abdominal fat depots compared with their peers also had reduced lung function, regardless of previous adiposity or BMI, according to a study.” While “the researchers concluded that there were associations between higher levels of visceral fat and obstructive lung patterns both at age 13 years, they did not see any associations between visceral fat at age 10 years and lung function at age 13 years.” The findings were published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

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Major Sports Leagues Promise White House They Will Provide More Opportunities For People To Be Physically Active, Learn About Nutrition

The AP (2/8, Superville) reports, “More than a dozen sports leagues and players associations, from the NFL to the PGA Tour, have promised the White House that they will provide more opportunities for people to be physically active and learn about nutrition and adopting healthy lifestyles.” The Biden Administration “announced Thursday that the leagues and associations are participating in the White House Challenge to End Hunger and Build Healthy Communities,” which “was launched last year as a follow-up to the 2022 White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health.” CNN (2/8, Waldenberg) reports, “Joining the White House are the NFL, NHL, MLB, NBA, WNBA, MLS, PGA Tour and NWSL, along with multiple players’ unions,” each of which “announced new commitments toward engaging the country’s children in league- and union-affiliated activities to promote exercise and better nutrition.”

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Children Living With Parents With Mental Illness Four Times As Likely To Be Placed In Out-Of-Home Care, Study Finds

Healio (2/8, Weldon) reports, “Children living with parents with mental illness were four times as likely to be placed in out-of-home care than their peers, according to findings from a Swedish study published in Pediatrics.” In the study, researchers “found that children living with mentally ill parents were four times as likely to be placed in OHC than children who were not. The groups most at-risk were children aged 0 to 1 year, children exposed to maternal illness and children exposed to parental intellectual disability.”

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CDC Research Finds Teens Turning To Substance Use To Ease Anxiety, Escape Worries

NBC News (2/8, Edwards) reports, “Teenagers with suspected substance use problems say they turn to drugs because of a crushing need to relax and escape worries, according to research published Thursday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” These results “follow reports of rising anxiety and depression among the nation’s youth, including unprecedented levels of hopelessness.” CNN (2/8, McPhillips) reports, “The most common reason that teens said they turned to drugs and alcohol was to feel mellow, calm or relaxed, with nearly three-quarters citing this reason.” But “many other top reasons were related to methods to cope with stress, with 44% saying they use substances to stop worrying about a problem or forget bad memories and 40% said they use substances to help with depression or anxiety.”

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Researchers Argue Biden Administration’s Executive Order Does Not Sufficiently Address The Role That Patient Outcomes Should Play In Regulation Of AI In Healthcare

Health IT Analytics (2/7, Kennedy) reports, “In a recent viewpoint published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), researchers from the University of California San Diego (UCSD) argued that the White House Executive Order on the Safe, Secure, and Trustworthy Development and Use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) does not sufficiently address the role that patient outcomes should play in healthcare AI regulation.” As proposed, the executive order’s “healthcare mandates focus heavily on developing regulatory strategies to promote safety, quality, privacy, and equity in the deployment of these technologies.”

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Around 20% Of Child Deaths In Auto Accidents Involved An Alcohol-Impaired Driver, Study Finds

Healio (2/7, Weldon) reports, “Around 20% of U.S. child passenger deaths in auto accidents from 1982 through 2020 involved an alcohol-impaired driver – typically the child’s own driver, according to a study” published in Pediatrics. Researchers found that “of the 7,944 child passengers who died in motor vehicle crashes from 2011 to 2020, 22% died in crashes involving an alcohol-impaired driver with a BAC of 0.08 g/dL or greater. In this subgroup, 64% died while riding in the same vehicle as an impaired driver. Additionally, 69% of impaired drivers survived the crash that killed their child passenger.”

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Medicaid On Track To Cover Around 71M People After “Unwinding”

KFF Health News (2/7, Galewitz) reports, “Halfway through what will be the biggest purge of Medicaid beneficiaries in a one-year span, enrollment in the government-run health insurance program is on track to return to roughly pre-pandemic levels.” Overall, “enrollment has fallen by about 9.5 million people from the record high reached last April, according to KFF.” This “puts Medicaid and CHIP enrollment on track to look, by the end of the unwinding later this year, a lot like it did at the start of the coronavirus pandemic: about 71 million people.”

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Despite Being The Leading Cause Of Death Among US Children, Funding For Research On Gun Violence Lags Far Behind Auto Accidents, Pediatric Cancer, Study Finds

CNN (2/7, McPhillips) reports, “More children die from guns than anything else in the United States, but relatively little funding is available to study how to prevent these tragedies.” Between “2008 to 2017, about $12 million in federal research awards were granted to study pediatric firearm mortality each year – about $600 per life lost, according to a study published in Health Affairs.” However, “motor vehicle crashes, the leading cause of death among children at the time, received about $26,000 of research funding per death, while funding to study pediatric cancer, the third leading cause of death, topped $195,000 per death.”

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COVID-19 Pandemic Reduced Children’s Readiness For Kindergarten, Study Finds

Healio (2/7, Weldon) says, “The COVID-19 pandemic reduced children’s readiness for kindergarten, researchers reported in JAMA Pediatrics.” According to the study, average Kindergarten Readiness Assessment (KRA) scores “were 260 in 2021, significantly lower compared with 2019 (262.7) and 2018 (263.5).” Just “30% of Cincinnati public school kindergartners were assessed as kindergarten-ready in 2021, a decline from 40% in 2018.”

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Families Grappling With Varying Guidance On When To Keep Children Home From School Due To Illness

The AP (2/7, Toness) reports, “During the pandemic, schools urged parents and children to stay home at any sign of illness.” But now that the emergency has ended, “widely varying guidance on when to keep children home has only added to the confusion, which many see as a factor in the nationwide epidemic of chronic school absences.” The AP adds, “Some advocates and school systems – and the state of California – are now encouraging kids to come to class even when they have the sniffles or other nuisance illnesses like lice or pinkeye.”

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Study Finds Maternal COVID-19 Vaccination Halves Unadjusted Mortality Rates For Newborns

MedPage Today (2/6, Kahn) reports, “Newborns whose mothers received at least one mRNA COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy had no worse outcomes than those whose mothers didn’t get the vaccine during pregnancy, a large cohort study from Sweden and Norway found.” In the study, “the unadjusted mortality rates for vaccine-exposed neonates in the two nations were about half of those for unexposed neonates, a difference that held up after adjustment for a variety of factors…reported” researchers in JAMA.

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Data Indicate Bivalent COVID-19 Vaccine 54% Effective Against Infection Among Children, Adolescents

MedPage Today (2/6, Hutto) reports, “During the 2022-2023 respiratory season, the bivalent COVID vaccines had an effectiveness of 54% against infection and 49% against symptomatic COVID in children and adolescents ages 5 to 17 years, a new study in JAMA showed.” MedPage Today interviewed Melissa Briggs Hagen, MD, MPH, of the CDC’s Coronavirus and Other Respiratory Viruses Division, about the latest data.

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Phthalates Are Linked To Tens Of Thousands Of Preterm Births In The US Each Year, Study Finds

USA Today (2/6, Cuevas) reports that phthalates, “chemicals commonly used for plastic in food containers, lotion and other products, are linked to tens of thousands of preterm births in the U.S. each year, according to a new study.” The research, published in The Lancet Planetary Health, indicates that “those babies’ medical bills over their lifetimes cost billions.” CNN (2/6, LaMotte) also reports.

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More Than 90% Of US COVID-19 Cases Now Caused By JN.1 Variant, CDC Says

CBS News (2/5, Tin) reports, “Close to all new COVID-19 cases in the United States are now being caused by the JN.1 variant, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says, with an estimated 93.1% of infections now blamed on the highly mutated strain.” At the same time, “COVID-19’s spread [is] now showing signs of slowing, following a peak over the winter holidays.” Just “the South has seen trends of the virus rise in wastewater over recent weeks, according to the CDC’s tally through Feb. 1.”

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Anti-Vaccine Activists Downplay Dangers Of Measles As Outbreaks Occur Worldwide

NBC News (2/5, Zadrozny) reports, “As outbreaks of measles spread throughout the world, anti-vaccine activists aren’t just urging people not to get vaccinated – they’re taking a page from a well-worn playbook, falsely downplaying the dangers from the highly contagious respiratory disease.” However, “national health agencies warn the fear of measles is well-founded.” The disease “sometimes comes with dire complications including pneumonia, seizures and brain damage. For every 1,000 cases of measles, about 200 children may be hospitalized, 50 may get pneumonia, one child may develop brain swelling along with deafness or disability, and between one and three may die.”

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Researchers See No Association Between Use Of ICS And Risk For Pneumonia Hospitalization In Children With Asthma

Pulmonology Advisor (2/5, Goldberg) reports, “In children with asthma, there is no association between use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and the risk for pneumonia hospitalization, according to study findings.” The research was published in Thorax.

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Adding Alirocumab Reduced LDL-C In Children With HeFH, Trial Shows

MedPage Today (2/5, Henderson) reports, “For kids with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) uncontrolled by statins, adding alirocumab (Praluent) reduced low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), a randomized clinical trial showed.” Researchers found that “the PCSK9 inhibitor significantly reduced LDL-C compared with placebo in both of two cohorts studied at 24 weeks.” MedPage Today adds, “The least squares…mean reduction from baseline over placebo was 43.3% in the cohort dosed every 2 weeks and 33.8% in the cohort dosed every 4 weeks, which were both significant.” The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics. HCP Live (2/5, Iapoce) also covers the story.

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Use Of E-Cigarettes Among Youths In US Peaked In 2019, Study Shows

Healio (2/5, Weldon) reports, “Use of e-cigarettes among youths in the United States peaked in 2019 and has declined in the years since, although not for all groups, a study showed.” Investigators came to this conclusion after studying “10 years of data from the CDC’s National Youth Tobacco Survey from 2013 to 2022, which included responses from more than 199,000 youths.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Premature Infants, Infants Younger Than Three Months Have Highest RSV Hospitalization Rates, Study Finds

Healio (2/5, Weldon) reports, “Infants aged younger than 3 months and children with a history of prematurity experience the highest rates of hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus, according to study findings published in Pediatrics.” According to the study, “the average annual RSV-associated hospitalization rate was 4 per 1,000 children (95% CI, 3.8-4.1). The rate was highest among children aged 0 to 2 months old (23.8 per 1,000; 95% CI, 22.5-25.2) and decreased with age. Premature children were almost twice as likely to be hospitalized vs. term children (rate ratio = 1.95; 95% CI, 1.76-2.11).”

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CDC Data Show Preterm And Early-Term Birth Rates Have Increased Since 2014

Lifesciences Intelligence (2/2, Salib) reported that on January 31, “the United States CDC published a National Vital Statistics Report (NVSS) evaluating the distribution of births by gestational age from 2014 to 2022.” The assessment revealed that in “2014, the global portion of all preterm births was 7.74%; however, that proportion increased by 12%, reaching 8.67% in 2022. The year-over-year increase was an average of 2% until 2019, with minor fluctuations in 2020, 2021, and 2022.” The rate of both “early and late preterm births increased simultaneously. More specifically, the rate of early preterm births increased from 2.07% to 2.16% between 2014 and 2022. Comparatively, the rate of late preterm birth increased from 5.67% to 6.51% in that time.”

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CDC Data Show Acute Flaccid Myelitis Cases Remained Low In 2022

MedPage Today (2/2, Kahn) reported, “Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) cases remained low in 2022, despite increased circulation of the enterovirus D68 (EV-D68) in the U.S., according to an analysis of CDC data.” Cases of AFM “ranged from 28 to 47 per year from 2019 to 2022 – far lower than the 238 confirmed cases in 2018…reported” researchers in the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The authors wrote, “Current trends do not indicate when the next increase of AFM might be expected. Clinicians should continue to suspect AFM in any child with acute flaccid limb weakness, especially those with a recent respiratory or febrile illness.”

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Single Dose Typhoid Conjugate Vaccine 80% Effective In Children, Results Show

Drug Topics (2/2, Weiser) reported a single dose typhoid conjugate vaccine “was highly effective in preventing typhoid fever” in children, showing “an overall efficacy of 80%,” a study published in The Lancet shows. Researchers in the 28,000-patient study collected 13,945 blood cultures from children who received the typhoid conjugate vaccine and confirmed “only 22 cases, compared to 109 cases” among children who received a meningococcal A conjugate vaccine as a control.

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Trial Reveals Nighttime Bracing Is An Effective Alternative For Treatment Of Moderate Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

MDEdge (2/2, Frellick) reported, “Wearing a brace at night is an effective alternative for moderate adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) if the patient rejects wearing a brace full time, new research suggests.” In a randomized trial titled “Conservative Treatment for Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis (CONTRAIS),” researchers “tested whether a group using self-managed physical activity combined with either nighttime bracing for 8 hours or scoliosis-specific exercise achieved better results than a control group doing self-managed physical activity alone for 1 hour per day in preventing Cobb angle progression in moderate-grade AIS.” The findings of the trial were published online in JAMA Network Open.

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Non-Pharmacological Interventions Could Help Improve Health Outcomes In Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes, Analysis Finds

Drug Topics (2/2, Meara) reported findings from a meta-analysis of 30 studies show “non-pharmacological interventions, like a balanced diet and regular physical activity, could help improve health outcomes in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.” The analysis was published in the journal Asian Nursing Research.

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Providers Rationing Penicillin As US Syphilis Infection Rate Spikes

KFF Health News (2/1, Sweeney) reports, “Nationwide, syphilis rates are at a 70-year high.” This “difficult situation was complicated last spring by a shortage of a specific penicillin injection that is the go-to treatment for syphilis.” The continuing “shortage is so severe that public health agencies have recommended that providers ration the drug – prioritizing pregnant patients, since it is the only syphilis treatment considered safe for them.”

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Research Finds Hydroxyurea Can Reduce Infections In Children With Sickle Cell Anemia

Pharmacy Times (2/1, McGovern) reports, “Recent research demonstrates that hydroxyurea can significantly reduce infections in children with sickle cell anemia.” The research supports “previous evidence that the efficacy of hydroxyurea can reduce the number of deaths in Africa among children with sickle cell anemia.” The findings were published in a press release.

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Tackle Football Linked To Changes In Brain Surface Structure And Functional Alterations In Adolescents, MRI Study Indicates

Aunt Minnie (2/1, Madden Yee) reports that a study using MRI indicates “playing tackle football” is “linked to changes in brain surface structure and functional alterations in adolescents.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Atopic Dermatitis In Children Linked To Metabolic Syndrome, Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease, Study Suggests

Healio (2/1, Capaldo) reports, “Atopic dermatitis in children may be associated with metabolic syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, according to a study.” Regarding metabolic syndrome, “results showed that children with AD experienced a much higher prevalence vs. children without AD.” The research found significant differences “between children with AD and controls when it came to blood pressure levels and waist circumference.” Among children with atopic dermatitis, “12% exhibited systolic blood pressure levels and 14% exhibited diastolic blood pressure levels that exceeded the 90th percentile for their age, sex and height vs. none of the controls.” The findings were published in Pediatric Dermatology.

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KFF Analysis: 16 Million Have Lost Medicaid Coverage Since Beginning Of Redeterminations

Healthcare Finance News (1/31, Morse) reports, “Ten months after states began the redetermination process, an estimated 16 million beneficiaries have lost Medicaid coverage, according to KFF analysis.” The Urban Institute predicted in December 2022 “that upwards of 18 million people could lose Medicaid coverage when the COVID-19 public health emergency expired.” The “prediction appears to be on target with KFF research of enrollment numbers.”

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Burden Of Disease From Headache Disorders Is Substantial In Adolescents And Young Adults, Study Finds

Neurology Advisor (1/31, Kurek) reports, “In adolescents and young adults, the burden of disease from headache disorders is substantial, especially in women and residents of countries with a high sociodemographic index (SDI), according to a study.” The findings were published in the Journal of Headache and Pain.

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Lawmakers Introduce Bill To Boost Protection For Children Online

The New York Times (1/31, Singer) reports, “Members of Congress have introduced a number of different bills intended to boost protections for children and teenagers online.” One bill, the Kids Online Safety Act or KOSA, “would require online services like social media networks, video game sites and messaging apps to take ‘reasonable measures’ to prevent harm – including online bullying, harassment, sexual exploitation, anorexia, self-harm and predatory marketing – to minors who used their platforms.”

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Infants With Severe Early-Life LRTIs Have Increased Risk For OSA, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (1/31, Stong) reports, “Infants with severe early‐life lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) have an increased risk for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), according to study findings.” The study “included 2962 children, of whom 21%…had an early‐life LRTI.” The research was published in Pediatric Pulmonology.

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Hospitalizations For Eating Disorders Increasing Among Adolescents In US, Researchers Say

Healio (1/31, Weldon) says, “Hospitalizations for eating disorders have increased steadily among adolescents in the United States, including a spike during the COVID-19 pandemic, researchers reported in Hospital Pediatrics.” Specifically, “hospitalizations increased more than sevenfold from 294 in 2010 to 2,135 in 2021, which was the highest yearly total. Hospitalizations increased more than 70% from 2019 – the year before the pandemic – to 2021. They decreased slightly after that to 1,783 cases in 2022.”

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US Syphilis Infection Rate At Highest Level Since 1950, CDC Says

The New York Times (1/30, Mandavilli) reports, “Syphilis, once nearly eliminated in the United States, continues to resurge, reaching the highest rate of new infections recorded since 1950, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Tuesday.” In 2022, there were more than 207,000 cases diagnosed, “the last year for which data are available. That represents an 80 percent increase since 2018, and 17 percent over the previous year’s tally, according to a new C.D.C. report.” CNN (1/30, McPhillips) reports, “There were 3,755 babies born with congenital syphilis in 2022, a 10-fold increase over the past decade and a 31% spike year-over-year; these cases caused 282 stillbirths and infant deaths in 2022.” Additionally, the infection rate “was highest among American Indian and Alaska Native people in 2022, with about 67 cases for every 100,000 people.”

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Body Composition Changes Occur At Different Stages Of Therapy For Transgender Boys Compared To Girls, Study Finds

Healio (1/30, Monostra) reports, “Transgender girls see most of their body composition changes occur during puberty suppression, whereas transgender boys experience greater body composition changes during gender-confirming testosterone therapy, according to study data” published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Early Life Adversity Is Associated With Sleep Disturbance, Depressive Symptoms During Transition To Adolescence Among Girls But Not Boys, Study Finds

Neurology Advisor (1/30, Nye) reports that a study found that “early life adversity…is associated with sleep disturbance and depressive symptoms during the transition to adolescence among girls but not boys.” The findings were published in The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

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Parental Controls To Protect Children Rarely Utilized By Meta Users

The Washington Post (1/30, Nix) reports, “Amid scrutiny of social media’s impact on kids and teens, tools that let parents track their children’s online activities have become increasingly popular.” However, “inside Meta, kids safety experts have long raised red flags about relying on such features” and their use “has been shockingly infrequent.” According to insiders, “less than 10 percent of teens on Meta’s Instagram had enabled the parental supervision setting” by the end of 2022, while “of those who did, only a single-digit percentage of parents had adjusted their kids’ settings.”

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Mild TBIs May Raise Risk For Affective, Behavioral Disorders In Children, Study Finds

Healio (1/30, Weldon) reports, “Mild traumatic brain injuries may raise the risk for affective and behavioral disorders in children, according to research published in Pediatrics.” In the study, overall, “patients with mTBIs were 25% more likely to be diagnosed with an affective disorder, which included depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and acute stress.”

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UK Seeks To Ban Single-Use Vapes, Restrict Flavors In Effort To Reduce Use By Children

The New York Times (1/29, Specia) reports that on Monday, British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak “unveiled a package of measures to ban single-use vapes, restrict flavors, and regulate packaging and displays.” Other countries, “and a number of American states…have already taken steps to curb underage vaping, as the colorful and trendy packaging and fruit or candy flavoring has proved appealing to teenagers and children.” The Times adds, “Mr. Sunak said that the ban, which is part of legislation that still has to be approved by Parliament, was intended to halt ‘one of the most worrying trends at the moment,’ before it becomes ‘endemic.’”

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Girls Who Received Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt For Infantile Hydrocephalus At Increased Risk Of Early Puberty, Study Finds

MedPage Today (1/29, Kneisel) reports, “Girls who received a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for infantile hydrocephalus had an increased risk of early puberty, particularly those with myelomeningocele and repeated shunt revisions, a population-based cohort study showed.” Out of “82 girls with infantile hydrocephalus, 21% had precocious puberty before age 8 years and another 29% had early puberty with signs appearing before 8 years and 9 months, found researchers.” And “early or precocious puberty was more common among girls who had undergone three or more shunt revisions, the researchers reported in Acta Paediatrica.”

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Low-Dose Aspirin In Pregnancy Does Not Impact Children’s Brain Development, Study Finds

MedPage Today (1/29, Robertson) reports, “Early antenatal exposure to low-dose aspirin neither worsened nor improved kids’ neurodevelopment, according to a follow-up study to the multinational ASPIRIN trial.” In the study, published in Obstetrics & Gynecology, “Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development (Bayley-III) cognitive composite scores indicated no difference with low-dose aspirin compared to placebo. The adjusted mean difference of -0.8 points fell well within the 4-point margin for noninferiority on a scale with a standard deviation of 15.”

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Analyses Of SIDS Autopsies Turned Up Evidence Of Neuroinflammation, Researchers Say

MedPage Today (1/29, Henderson) says, “Molecular analyses of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) autopsy material turned up evidence of neuroinflammation, with a specific virus identified in one case, researchers reported.” Out of “64 SIDS cases and 15 controls with measurement of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of neopterin from activated macrophages, a total of six SIDS cases with high CSF neopterin were identified, ‘suggestive of neuroinflammation,’ reported” researchers in a study published JAMA Neurology. And “metagenomic next-generation sequencing (mNGS) detected changes associated with human parechovirus type 3 (HPeV3) infection in tissue and CSF from one of the six SIDS cases with elevated neopterin, they reported.”

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Teenagers Who Use Cannabis, Alcohol, And Nicotine Are More Likely To Have Underlying Psychiatric Symptoms, Research Finds

The New York Times (1/29, Richtel) reports, “Teenagers who use cannabis, alcohol and nicotine are more likely to have underlying psychiatric symptoms, and worse symptoms, than their peers who are not regularly using substances, new research has found.” Investigators “found that such substances are linked to an array of symptoms and conditions, including anxiety, depression, hyperactivity and suicidal ideation.” Additionally, the research “found that the link between substance use and mental health existed even at low levels of drug and alcohol use.” The study was found in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Pet Bearded Dragons Associated With Rare Salmonella Strain, CDC Says

The New York Times (1/26, Jacobs) reported, “The outbreak of a rare strain of salmonella that sickened scores of people, including several infants, across the United States and Canada, has been linked to pet bearded dragons, some most likely obtained from the same breeder in Southeast Asia, according to a study published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” The agency noted that salmonella infections linked to bearded dragons “have become increasingly common in recent years, mirroring the rising popularity of the…lizards as household pets.”

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Prompt Treatment Of Infantile Epileptic Spasms Syndrome Can Prevent Developmental Delays, Study Indicates

The Washington Post (1/28, Blakemore) reports, “Prompt diagnosis and treatment of infantile epileptic spasms syndrome…can prevent developmental delays,” according to a recent analysis. Notably, “non-Hispanic Black children are less likely than their White counterparts to get timely treatment for infantile spasms.” The findings were published in Epilepsia.

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Experts Say Better Tracking Required To Determine Role Of Cellphones In Traffic Accidents

The New York Times (1/26, Richtel) reported, “Cellphones can track what we say and write, where we go, what we buy and what we search on the internet. But they still aren’t being used to track one of the biggest public health threats: crashes caused by drivers distracted by the phones.” There is still no government “database of the number of crashes or fatalities caused by cellphone distraction. Safety experts say that current estimates most likely understate a worsening problem.” They also “said the current data were effectively unscientific and inaccurate.”

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CDC Warns Clinicians To Be Alert For Measles Cases Following Several Outbreaks

USA Today (1/26, Cuevas) reported, “U.S. health officials are warning clinicians to be alert for cases of measles following several outbreaks, largely among children who were eligible for the vaccine but did not receive it.” In an email, the CDC on Thursday “urged vigilance among health providers across the U.S. following reports of nearly two dozen cases of the preventable virus since December.” In particular, “health providers should look for patients with rash and fever, symptoms of measles, and pay attention to patients who have recently traveled internationally, the alert said.” ABC News (1/27, Kekatos, Benadjaoud) reported, “Between Dec. 1, 2023, and Jan. 23, 2024, there have been 23 confirmed cases of measles including seven cases from international travelers and two outbreaks with five or more infections each, according to an email sent [last] week.”

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Study Finds Lower Maternal Hemoglobin Concentration Linked To Faster Fetal Growth, Larger Birth Weight

HCP Live (1/25, Smith) reports, “Intake of folate, vitamin B12, and iron is not linked to fetal abdominal circumference or estimated fetal weight growth, placental weight, or birth weight, according to recent findings.” But “lower maternal concentrations of hemoglobin were connected to faster fetal growth rates and larger placental weights and larger birthweights.” These results were published in Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

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Researchers Identify Factors Associated With Higher Risk Of Suicidal Thoughts At Age 16

CNN (1/25, Rogers) reports, “Being socially withdrawn and experiencing physical discomforts as a preteen is associated with a higher risk of having suicidal thoughts at age 16, according to” a study. In the study of more than 2,700 individuals, investigators found that study “participants who experienced social withdrawal and somatic symptoms throughout adolescence were around two to three times more likely to experience suicidal thoughts at age 16.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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FDA Approves Expanded Indication For Dupixent To Treat EoE In Younger Children

Reuters (1/25, Leo, Singh, Sunny, Rajan) reports that the FDA “has approved the use of Regeneron and Sanofi’s Dupixent [dupilumab] to treat an allergic inflammation of the esophagus,” eosinophilic esophagitis, “in children aged one to 11 years old and weighing at least 15 kg, the companies said on Thursday.” The decision “comes after a higher dose Dupixent made the condition less intense in 66% of patients below the age of 12 in a late-stage study.”

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Study Finds Low Rates Of New Peanut Allergy, Peanut Discontinuation After Introduction In Cohort Of High-Risk Infants

Healio (1/25, Jenkins) reports, “Researchers found low rates of new peanut allergy and generally low rates of peanut discontinuation after introduction in a cohort of high-risk infants, according to study results published in” The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice. However, these “results also showed the need for extra guidance and reassurance, suggesting that ‘there may be families who need extra support with early introduction of peanut, particularly those with peanut-allergic parents or siblings,’ Corinne Keet, MD, PhD, professor of pediatrics at University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, told Healio.”

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Infant With Congenital Hyperinsulinism Responded Well To Off-Label Treatment With Breast Cancer Drug, Researchers Say

MedPage Today (1/24, Monaco) says, “A 4-month-old with congenital hyperinsulinism responded well to off-label treatment with a breast cancer drug, researchers reported.” The infant “presented with severe congenital hyperinsulinism due to homozygous deletion of the ABCC8 gene but failed to respond to any convention medical therapies,” researchers “detailed in a New England Journal of Medicine correspondence.” The medical “team started the infant on alpelisib (Piqray) – an α-selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor that was approved for the treatment of PIK3CA-mutated breast cancer and overgrowth syndromes. During treatment, there was a substantial reduction in the percentage of time below the target range (under 63 mg/dL). By week 13, continuous glucose monitoring showed the patient only spent 20% of time below target range.”

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Study Finds There Were More Than 114K Calls To Poison Control Centers Due To Laundry Detergent Pods Exposure From 2014 To 2022

Healio (1/24, Weldon) says, “Calls to poison control centers to report exposures to liquid laundry detergent packets – commonly called pods – remain high in the United States, although exposures appear to have declined among young children, researchers reported.” The study published in Clinical Toxicology found that “between January 2014 and December 2022, the researchers identified 114,826 exposure calls to poison control centers regarding single and polysubstance exposures to liquid laundry detergent packets.”

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More Than 21M People Signed Up For Health Plans Through ACA Marketplace This Year, Biden Administration Says

The Washington Post (1/24, A1, Diamond) reports that the Biden Administration announced on Wednesday that “more than 21 million people have signed up for health plans through the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplaces.” Enrollments “in the health insurance marketplaces…were partly driven by states ‘unwinding’ pandemic-era protections in Medicaid, with millions of people culled from the safety net health program, said Biden officials and outside researchers.” According to the Post, “the enrollment figures reflect a roughly 80 percent surge in sign-ups for the ACA since President Biden took office in 2021 and expanded the subsidies available to consumers.” Reuters (1/24, Sunny) reports, “More than 5 million people who have signed up for 2024 plans are new enrollees, according to data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services.”

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Ibuprofen Again Failed To Improve Short-Term Outcomes When Used To Close Patent Ductus Arteriosus In Newborns, Trial Shows

MedPage Today (1/24, Lou) reports, “Ibuprofen again failed to improve short-term outcomes when used to close patent ductus arteriosus…in newborns, the placebo-controlled Baby-OSCAR trial showed.” Investigators found that, “administered parenterally a few days after infants were born premature, ibuprofen did not reduce the trial’s combined primary endpoint nor its individual components at 36 weeks of postmenstrual age.” The findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Infants Born To Unvaccinated Mothers Who Had COVID-19 During Pregnancy Were At Higher Risk For Developing Neonatal Respiratory Distress, Study Finds

MedPage Today (1/24, Kahn) reports, “Infants born to unvaccinated mothers who had COVID-19 during pregnancy were at high risk for developing neonatal respiratory distress, the longitudinal, cohort COMP study found.” The risks “of developing respiratory distress were threefold higher in infants born to unvaccinated mothers diagnosed with COVID-19 while pregnant compared with COVID-exposed infants born to COVID-vaccinated mothers…reported” researchers in Nature Communications. HCP Live (1/24, Smith) reports, “The investigators noted that unvaccinated mothers were shown to have had greater incidence of severe or critical disease, at a rate of 16% compared to those who were vaccinated at 4%.”

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Boy Can Hear After Receiving Gene Therapy At Children’s Hospital Of Philadelphia

The New York Times (1/23, Kolata) reports that on Oct. 4, Aissam Dam, an 11-year-old boy who was born deaf, “was treated at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, becoming the first person to get gene therapy in the United States for congenital deafness.” The “treatment was a success.” Though “it will take years for doctors to sign up many more patients – and younger ones – to further test the therapy, researchers said that success for patients like Aissam could lead to gene therapies that target other forms of congenital deafness.”

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T2D Risk Higher For Adolescents With Obesity Or Overweight And Baseline HbA1c Over 6%, Study Finds

Healio (1/23, Monostra) reports, “The risk for developing type 2 diabetes is substantially higher for adolescents with overweight or obesity and an HbA1c of at least 6.1% compared with those with an HbA1c of 5.5% or less, according to study data.” In the study, published in JAMA Network Open, a “5-year cumulative incidence of type 2 diabetes was 1%. Incidence rates climbed with baseline HbA1c, reaching 11% for those with a baseline HbA1c of 6.1% to 6.2% and 28.5% for adolescents with a baseline HbA1c of 6.3% to 6.4%.”

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Childhood Adversity Could Increase Probability Of Poor CV Health In Adulthood, Study Finds

HCP Live (1/23, Iapoce) reports, “Adverse family experiences in childhood may increase the probability of poor cardiovascular health in adulthood, while stable childhood relationships may benefit optimal heart health throughout adulthood, according to new research.” The research “showed positive relationships between caregiver and childhood correlated with a higher likelihood of reaching ideal heart health across a two-decade span of adulthood. On the other hand, adversity in childhood, including abuse, showed a lower chance of reaching optimal cardiovascular health in maturity.” The study was published in Circulation.

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USPSTF Says There Is Insufficient Evidence To Screen Asymptomatic Young Children For Speech, Language Delay

Healio (1/23, Rhoades) reports, “There is not enough evidence to assess the benefits and harms of screening asymptomatic young children for speech and language delay and disorders, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force ruled in a final recommendation.” Rather, “clinicians should use their judgment when determining if screening and treatment are needed.” The recommendations were published in JAMA.

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Report Finds Increasing EHR Efficiency To Prevent Clinician Burnout Easier Than Reducing Burnout After It Has Peaked

EHR Intelligence (1/22, Nelson) reports, “Preventing clinician burnout by increasing EHR efficiency is easier than reducing burnout after it has peaked, according to a KLAS Arch Collaborative report.” In general, “the number of clinicians reporting burnout has slightly decreased since 2022.” The researchers “suggested that this is likely due to healthcare organizations implementing programs to mitigate burnout, such as groups that promote community and burnout reduction initiatives led by chief wellness officers. Still, clinician burnout levels remain higher than pre-pandemic rates of burnout.”

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Study Finds Exposure To Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals May Reduce Bone Density Among Children, Young Adults

Healio (1/22, Monostra) reports, “Exposure to higher levels of endocrine-disrupting chemicals may hinder bone development for children, adolescents and young adults, according to study findings published in Environmental Research.” According to an analysis of the data, “exposure to greater levels of some types of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) was associated with decreases in bone mineral density, though associations varied based on PFAS type and sex.”

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FDA Clears Second-Generation Monarch eTNS System For Treatment Of Pediatric Patients With ADHD

Healio (1/22) reports, “The FDA has cleared NeuroSigma’s second-generation Monarch eTNS System for treatment of pediatric” patients with “ADHD, the company announced in a press release.” The device “is indicated as a monotherapy for patients aged 7 to 12 years who are not currently taking prescription ADHD medications, according to the release.”

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Report Finds 70% Of Children Drop Of Out Organized Sports By Age 13 Due To Injuries, Overtraining, And Burnout

ABC News (1/22, Hannon) says, “Injuries, overtraining and burnout are contributing to a high dropout rate in youth sports, according to a new report.” The report published in Pediatrics “found that 70% of kids drop out of organized youth sports by age 13.” Additionally, “nearly 1 in 10 youth athletes experience burnout, and as many as 35% experience overtraining, according to the report.”

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Novel Sepsis Criteria Improved Diagnosis Of Pediatric Sepsis, Septic Shock Compared To 2005 Criteria, Study Finds

MedPage Today (1/22, Short) reports, “The novel Phoenix sepsis criteria, created by the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM) Pediatric Sepsis Definition Task Force, improved diagnosis of pediatric sepsis and septic shock compared with existing criteria from 2005, a retrospective cohort study showed.” In the study, “the integer version of the four-organ model Phoenix Sepsis Score had area under the precision recall curves of 0.23 to 0.38 (95% CI range 0.20-0.39) and area under the receiver operating characteristic curves of 0.71 to 0.92 (95% CI range 0.70-0.92) to predict mortality in the validation sets, reported” researchers in JAMA.

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Pre-Sports Participation CV Screening Most Accurate In Kids 12 Years Old And Up, Study Finds

Healio (1/19, Swain) reported, “When children aged 8 to 15 years were screened for risk for before participating in sports, the diagnostic yield for identifying those at risk was higher in those aged 12 years or older, researchers” found. The findings were published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

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Efforts To Require Private Insurance To Cover Children’s Hearing Aids Falter In Some States

KFF Health News (1/19, DeGuzman) reported that 18 US “states don’t require private insurance plans to cover hearing aids for kids, so many don’t.” However, “about two or three of every 1,000 babies in the U.S. are born with detectable hearing loss in one or both ears, according to the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.” Grassroots action has “helped steer legislatures in 32 states to pass bills that would require private insurance to cover hearing aids for children,” but “the fix…is not always an easy one.” Recently, bills failed to pass “in New York and Hawaii. And, in California…Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom vetoed a measure in October that would have required such coverage.”

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CDC Says 47 Children, Adolescents Have Died From Flu So Far This Season

NBC News (1/19, Edwards) reported, “The current flu season is shaping up to be a severe one for children.” Thus far, “47 kids and teens have died from the flu, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday – a worrisome toll that experts say puts the U.S. on track with what was seen last flu season, a particularly bad one for children that ended with 183 pediatric deaths reported.” In the general population, “an estimated 180,000 people have been hospitalized so far this season, and 11,000 people have died.”

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Three Or More Maternal Doses Of COVID-19 Vaccine Enhance Antibody Concentrations In Preterm Infants Compared To Two Or Fewer Doses, Study Finds

Healio (1/19, Weldon) reported, “Three or more doses of maternal COVID-19 vaccine significantly enhance antibody concentrations in preterm infants compared with two or fewer doses, according to study results published in JAMA Network Open.” According to the research, “cord anti-S antibody geometric mean concentration was 1,000 (95% CI, 874-1,144) after two doses and 9,992 (95% CI, 8381-1,1914) after three or more doses.” MedPage Today (1/19, Kahn) reported, “Notably, cord anti-S antibody levels were similar in preterm and full-term pregnancies, with geometric mean concentrations of 8,818 and 10,423, respectively (P=0.34).”

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Mothers With Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes Have Higher Risks For Having Children With Congenital Heart Defect, Study Finds

Healio (1/18, Monostra) reports, “Mothers with type 1 or type 2 diabetes have increased risks for having children with a congenital heart defect, according to a study.” Investigators came to this conclusion after analyzing “nationwide register data from all children born in Finland from 2006 to 2016 and their mothers.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Timely Correction Of Modifiable Risk Factors May Lower Mortality Risk Among Infants With Early-Onset Sepsis, Study Finds

Infectious Disease Advisor (1/18, Kuhns) reports, “The timely correction of certain modifiable risk factors, including low birth weight, persistent pulmonary hypertension, septic shock, heart failure, and high serum lactic acid and aspartate aminotransferase levels, may decrease mortality risk among infants with early-onset sepsis, according to study results.” The research found “infants in the mortality group had significantly lower mean values with respect to birth weight (1819.5 g vs 2895.9 g), weight at admission (1828.9 g vs 2867.2 g), and gestational age (31.8 vs 38.6 weeks).” Furthermore, infants in the mortality group “were significantly younger at hospital admission…and more likely to have been delivered via cesarean section (76.3% vs 54.6%).” The findings were published in BMC Infectious Diseases.

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Offspring Born To Mothers With Prenatal Or Third Trimester Intestinal Infection Or Genitourinary Tract Infection Experienced Higher Risk For Biliary Atresia, Study Finds

Healio (1/18, Burba) reports, “Offspring born to mothers with prenatal or third trimester intestinal infection or genitourinary tract infection experienced a significantly higher risk for biliary atresia, according to a study.” Investigators, “using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database and the Taiwan Maternal and Child Health Database…conducted a population-based, case control study to assess the association between prenatal infections in mothers and development of BA in their offspring.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Opioid Use During Pregnancy Tied To Greater Risk For Hospitalizations, ED Visits For Immune-Related Conditions In Exposed Offspring, Study Finds

MedPage Today (1/18, Firth) reports a study found that “opioid use during pregnancy for pain or opioid use disorder was associated with an increased risk for hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits for immune-related conditions in exposed offspring.” Among “more than 400,000 kids born in Western Australia, those with perinatal opioid exposure had an increased risk of perinatal infection…and eczema and dermatitis…compared with non-exposed children,” the research found. The findings were published in JAMA Network Open. HealthDay (1/18, Mundell) reports the research shows that “fetal exposure to opioids may change a baby’s immune system, triggering a rise in risks for eczema and asthma through early childhood.”

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FDA Grants Rare Pediatric Disease Designation To DF-003 To Treat Patients With ROSAH Syndrome

Healio (1/17) reports, “The FDA has granted rare pediatric disease designation to” DF-003, “an alpha-kinase 1 inhibitor, to treat patients with retinal dystrophy, optic nerve edema, splenomegaly, anhidrosis and headache, or ROSAH, syndrome.”

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At-Home Medication Errors In Children Can Be Reduced Through Improved Caregiver Education, Study Suggests

PatientEngagementHIT (1/17, Heath) reports a new study “is advocating for more depth and breadth during the pediatric hospital discharge process, asserting that providing caregiver and patient education with more health literacy considerations will help address patient safety.” The research “demonstrated how deepening parental education during the pediatric hospital discharge process can prevent at-home medication errors that often result in patient safety events and, in some cases, rehospitalization.” In the study, “a patient education approach that considered low health literacy levels of parent/guardian caregivers proved effective for reducing posthospitalization medication errors.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Azithromycin Fails To Prevent Infant Deaths When Provided At Routine Healthcare Visits In Burkina Faso, Trial Shows

MedPage Today (1/17, Kahn) reports, “Azithromycin did not prevent infant deaths when provided at routine healthcare visits in the West African country of Burkina Faso, a randomized controlled trial demonstrated.” The research found that “among infants who received a single oral dose of azithromycin at routine visits, 0.52% died before 6 months of age compared with 0.48% who received a placebo.” The findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Healio (1/17, Weldon) reports “the evidence showed no effect of azithromycin on mortality in any of the prespecified subgroups, including subgroups defined according to age, sex and baseline weight, and no difference between the two trial groups in the incidence of adverse events.”

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Majority Of Schools Increased Social, Emotional Supports For Students Affected By Coronavirus, But Fewer Schools Provided Treatment, Diagnosis Of Mental Health Disorders, 2021-2022 Data Show

The Washington Post (1/17, Meckler, Natanson) reports, “In the year following George Floyd’s murder in 2020, the number of school resource officers fell as districts responded to calls for limits on police, according to data released…by the U.S. Education Department.” Additionally, “the report found that the overwhelming majority of schools increased social and emotional supports for students affected by the coronavirus, but fewer schools provided treatment and diagnosis of mental health disorders.” The new report examined “the state of safety and security on campuses in 2021-22.”

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States Used Waivers To Support Medicaid Redetermination Processes After COVID-19 Public Health Emergency Ended, Brief Says

HealthPayerIntelligence (1/17, Waddill) reports, “States flocked toward ex parte renewals and contact information update waivers to support Medicaid redetermination processes after the coronavirus public health emergency ended, a KFF brief found.” After examining “states’ waivers, KFF identified a couple of pervasive trends characterizing states’ efforts to keep eligible beneficiaries enrolled in Medicaid.” Nearly “every state adopted a waiver to increase ex parte renewals,” and “most states (38) allowed ex parte renewals for no- or low-income individuals.” Furthermore, “33 states adopted processes that presume that no new information submitted means the beneficiary did not experience a change in assets, in which case states do not have to verify the beneficiary’s information or they can verify it through a simplified process.”

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Study Suggests Anonymous Reporting Systems Help Prevent Instances Of Suicide, School Violence

CNN (1/17, Campbell) reports, “Anonymous reporting systems used by schoolchildren to report concerning behavior among their peers has resulted in the prevention of numerous instances of suicide, school violence and planned attacks, according to a study.” After reviewing “tips submitted from 2019 to 2023 in one southeastern state, the researchers found that the anonymous reporting system ‘enabled 1,039 confirmed mental health interventions; 109 ‘saves’ where clear evidence of imminent suicide crisis was present and averted; prevented 38 acts of school-violence including weapons recovered on school grounds; and averted 6 confirmed planned school attacks,’ according to the report.” The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Playing Loud Video Games Linked To Hearing Loss, Study Finds

CNN (1/16, Rogers) reports, “When it comes to being exposed to extremely loud sounds at concerts, researchers have long warned about the consequences for your hearing,” but “these risks may also come with playing video games, according to new research.” The study “found that when participants played video games, average sound levels often nearly exceeded or exceeded permissible sound exposure limits, the risks of which grow the more time people spend exposed to them.” The findings were published in BMJ Public Health. Forbes (1/16, Hart) also covers the story.

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Drinking 100% Fruit Juice Linked To Weight Gain In Children And Adults, Study Indicates

CNN (1/16, LaMotte) reports, “Drinking a glass or more of 100% fruit juice each day was linked to a small increase in weight in children and adults, according to a new analysis of prior studies.” The findings suggest that, “in children, each additional serving per day of 100% fruit juice was associated with a 0.03 higher body mass index … change.” The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Study Finds Elevated Lipid Levels Are Linked To Cardiac Damage In Adolescents, Young Adults

Healio (1/16, Swain) reports, “Elevated lipid levels were associated with worsening structural and functional cardiac damage in adolescents and young adults, though in the case of LDL, the relationship was partially mediated by elevated BP and fat mass, data show.” The study found that at seven “years, the following lipid parameters were associated with higher odds of worsening LV hypertrophy: total cholesterol,” triglycerides, LDL, and non-HDL. The findings were published in Atherosclerosis.

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Nearly 20% Of Patients With MIS-C Would Not Be Diagnosed Under Newly Updated Definition, Researchers Say

Healio (1/16, Weldon) says, “Nearly one in five patients diagnosed with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children based on a 2020 definition would not be diagnosed with the illness using an updated definition, researchers reported in Pediatrics.” Under the new guidelines, the CDC “replaced a definition from 2020 that required ‘the presence of fever, systemic inflammation using a number of biomarkers, and involvement of at least two of seven organ systems,’ the authors of the new study wrote. The new case definition no longer required a duration of subjective or measured fever but did require C-reactive protein (CRP) of 3 mg/dL or more to indicate systemic inflammation, among other changes.”

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JN.1 Variant Driving New Wave Of COVID-19 In US

NBC News (1/13, Syal) reported, “The U.S. is currently in the midst of a Covid wave, fueled by the JN.1 variant that’s driving up hospitalizations and deaths across the country.” However, for most people, “the new variant doesn’t seem to be causing worse symptoms.” The article discussed whether current at-home tests work against the new variant, and who should be most vigilant.

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CDC Data Indicate Slight Downtick In Flu Cases For The First Week Of January, But Experts Warn Flu Season Far From Over

CNN (1/12, McPhillips) reported, “The United States started the new year awash in respiratory illness, with high levels of flu, Covid-19 and RSV across most of the country.” CDC data “notes that some measures of flu activity dipped in early January, but the single week of decrease is not a trend – and experts warn that more increases are likely to come.” NBC News (1/12, Edwards) reported, “The latest numbers are from the first week in January, and may simply reflect that schools were closed and that people tend to be less likely to see their doctor over the holidays.”

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Amid Shortage Of Blood Donations, Red Cross Targets Younger Donors In New Campaign

NBC News (1/14, Edwards) reported, “The need for blood is urgent. Over the holidays, the Red Cross had 7,000 fewer units of blood available than were needed by hospitals, said Dr. Eric Gehrie, the executive medical director of the American Red Cross.” A new campaign by the Red Cross aims “to prompt teens and young adults to give blood for the first time. That would hopefully spark lifelong habits of donating – habits that could help reverse a decadeslong decline in blood donations.”

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Babies Who Are Breastfed During First Three Months Of Life Have Lower Risk Of Childhood Obesity, Study Finds

HealthDay (1/15, Thompson) reports, “Babies who are breastfed during their first three months of life have a lower risk of childhood obesity, a new study shows.” Additionally, “the longer a mom breastfeeds, the more likely it is her kid will avoid obesity as a child – especially if she’s carrying extra weight, the researchers added.” The results were published in Pediatrics.

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Study Details Impact Of Temperature, Humidity On Children During Pregnancy

HealthDay (1/12, Thompson) reported, “Hot or humid days during pregnancy could influence the future heart health of your unborn child, a new study finds.” The kids “of expecting moms exposed to high humidity tended to have a steeper increase in blood pressure through ages 3 to 10, researchers reported Jan. 8 in the journal JACC: Advances.” However, “exposure to higher temperatures in the womb was associated with a slower increase in blood pressure.”

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Hybrid COVID-19 Immunity In Pregnancy Increases Protection For Mothers, Infants At Delivery, Study Finds

Healio (1/12, Stulpin) reported, “Hybrid SARS-CoV-2 immunity in pregnancy – immunity from a prior infection plus vaccination – is associated with a greater likelihood of protection at delivery for mothers and infants compared with a prior infection alone, a study found.” According to results published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, “data showed that at delivery, fewer unvaccinated participants (87% anti-spike IgG+, 86% neutralizing antibodies) and their infants (86%, 75%) had anti-spoke IgG+ or neutralizing antibodies compared with vaccinated participants and their infants (100% for all).”

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Multiple Indicators Can Be Reliable Predictors For Describing Chronic Nonbacterial Osteomyelitis Disease Activity In Children, Study Finds

Rheumatology Advisor (1/11, Kuhns) reports, “The pediatric chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (PedCNO) follow-up treatment score, physician global disease activity (PGDA) score, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-defined lesions, and childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (C-HAQ) scores are reliable parameters for describing chronic nonbacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) disease activity in children, according to” a study. The findings were published in Arthritis Research & Therapy.

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Assessing Extremely Preterm Infants At Corrected Age Of 21 To 24 Months Linked To Higher Odds Of Detecting Significant Developmental Delay, Study Finds

Healio (1/11, Weldon) reports, “Assessing formerly extremely preterm infants at a corrected age of 21 to 24 months is associated with higher odds of detecting a significant developmental delay than assessing them at an earlier time, a study” found. The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Young Children With Severe BHR And House Dust Mite Allergy At Increased Risk For Persistent Asthma In Later Life, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (1/11, Stong) reports, “Young children with severe bronchial hyperresponsiveness and house dust mite allergy have an increased risk for persistent asthma in later life, according to” a study. The findings were published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

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Indoor Metabolites, Chemicals May Be More Accurate Indicators Of Risks For Childhood Asthma, Allergic Rhinitis Than Indoor Microbiome, Study Finds

Healio (1/11, Gawel) reports, “Indoor metabolites and chemicals may be more accurate indicators of risks for childhood asthma and allergic rhinitis than the indoor microbiome, according to a study.” The findings were published in Eco-Environment and Health.

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More Than 20M Americans Sign Up For Affordable Care Act Plans

Reuters (1/10, Sunny) reports, “More than 20 million Americans have so far signed up for health insurance through the Affordable Care Act’s marketplace for this year, the highest since the inception of the law, according to data released on Wednesday.” According to HHS data, “over 3.7 million people who have signed up for the 2024 plans are new enrollees.” The Hill (1/10, Choi) reports, “This most recent enrollment period, which ends Tuesday, was marked by several factors that set it apart from previous years,” including a more flexible timeline. Additionally, “more insurers than ever also participated in the marketplace, providing customers with a wider variety of plans to choose from.”

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FDA Allows Temporary Importation Of Syphilis Drug To Address Shortages

Reuters (1/10, Santhosh) reports the FDA “will temporarily allow the import of a syphilis drug made by France’s Laboratoires Delbert, the company said on Wednesday.” According to a letter on the FDA’s website, “Laboratoires Delbert said it was coordinating with the health regulator to bring extencilline into the United States to address syphilis drug shortages.” The Hill (1/10, Weixel) reports, “Benzathine penicillin G is the preferred treatment for syphilis, and the only recommended treatment for pregnant people and infants with possible syphilis,” although “it’s been in shortage since April.” Meanwhile, “Pfizer, which is the only company manufacturing the drug in the U.S., said it would take until at least the second quarter of 2024 to increase production enough to end the shortage.”

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Number Of American Teens Who Smoke Has Dropped Dramatically, With Less Than 1% Now Daily Smokers, Study Finds

HealthDay (1/10, Mundell) reports, “The number of American teens who smoke or have even tried smoking has dropped dramatically compared to a generation ago, with less than 1% now saying they light up cigarettes daily.” The findings were published in Ochsner Journal.

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Study Finds Children With Obesity Demonstrate Greater Likelihood Of Shock, ICU Admission And Worse Laboratory Scores In Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome

Healio (1/10) reports, “Children with obesity demonstrate a greater likelihood of shock, ICU admission and worse laboratory scores in multisystem inflammatory syndrome, but not Kawasaki disease, according to” study data. The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Nearly 1 In 10 Teens Globally Have Used Potentially Harmful Weight-Loss Products, Study Finds

CNN (1/10, McPhillips) reports, “Adolescents worldwide, especially girls, have used non-prescribed drugs, dietary supplements and other weight-loss products at a ‘high level,’ according to a new analysis.” The researchers “estimate that about 9% of adolescents in the general population have used over-the-counter weight-loss products in their lifetime,” with diet pills the most common products used, followed by laxatives and diuretics. The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Survey Names Nurse Practitioner As Best Job Of 2024

Medical Marketing & Media (1/9, O’Brien) says, “Healthcare reigned supreme as the top category for jobs and careers, according to a survey released by U.S. News & World Report Tuesday morning.” Notably, “among individual jobs, nurse practitioners finished in first place, recording a median salary of $121,610 and an unemployment rate of 0.6%.” In addition to nurse practitioners, the top five healthcare jobs were “physician assistant, speech language pathologist, occupational therapist and veterinarian.”

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Measles Outbreak In Philadelphia Widens To Eight Known Cases

CNN (1/9, Hassan) reports, “A cluster of measles cases in Philadelphia has widened to include eight people over the past month, including at least five children, according to the city’s health department.” Notably, “a person who contracted measles outside the United States went to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia in early December, the health department said, exposing three people at the hospital who later tested positive for the highly contagious virus.” Further exposures were detected at a Philadelphia day care attended by one of the patients.

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Children Who Had Thromboembolic Pulmonary Embolism Rarely Developed Post-PE Syndrome, Study Finds

Healio (1/9, Friedman) reports, “Children who had a thromboembolic pulmonary embolism rarely developed post-PE syndrome, including high blood pressure in the lungs or cardiac or functional impairment, according to a study.” The findings were published in Blood.

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Increases In Average Rain Or Snowfall Lead To Airway Inflammation In Adolescents, Study Indicates

Healio (1/9, Hornick) reports, “Among adolescents, increases in average rain or snowfall over a week resulted in heightened fractional exhaled nitric oxide, signaling airway inflammation, according to” a study. The findings were published in Annals of the American Thoracic Society.

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Study Finds Influenza Vaccination Significantly Decreased Risk For Pediatric Hospitalizations, ED Admissions, And Urgent Care Visits

Infectious Disease Advisor (1/9, Barowski) reports, “Influenza vaccination was found to significantly decrease the risk for influenza A-associated hospitalizations, emergency department admissions, and urgent care visits among children and adolescents during the 2022 to 2023 influenza season,” according to a study. The findings were published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Death Of A Sibling During Childhood Or Early Adulthood Linked With Increased Risks For CVDs, Study Finds

Healio (1/8, Schaffer) reports, “The death of a sibling from any cause during childhood or early adulthood was associated with increased risks for overall or most type-specific CVDs, data from a Danish cohort show.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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FDA Warning Over Side Effects Of Allergy, Asthma Drug Montelukast Appeared To Have Had Little Impact On Use

The New York Times (1/9, Jewett, Mueller) reports that in 2020, the FDA “responded to decades of escalating concerns about a commonly prescribed drug for asthma and allergies by deploying one of its most potent tools: a stark warning on the drug’s label that it could cause aggression, agitation and even suicidal thoughts.” The “label, which was primarily aimed at doctors, was supposed to sound an alert about the 25-year-old medication, Singulair [montelukast].” However, “it barely dented use: The drug was still prescribed to 12 million people in the United States in 2022.” Children “face the greatest risks of the drug’s ill effects, and while usage by minors did decline, it was still taken by 1.6 million of them.” The agency’s “handling of Singulair illustrates systemic gaps in the agency’s approach to addressing troubling side effects from medicines approved long ago – and to warning the public and doctors when serious issues arise.”

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Temporary Hearing Loss Caused By Recurring Ear Infections In Children Can Lead To Delays In Language Development And Sound Processing Years Later, Study Indicates

HealthDay (1/8, Thompson) reports, “Ear infections are common for kids, but they can lead to long-term developmental problems, a new study finds.” The article adds “temporary hearing loss caused by recurring ear infections can lead to delays in language development and sound processing years later, researchers reported.” The findings were published in the International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology.

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Percentage Of Girls And Boys Who Initiated The HPV Vaccine Series Before Age 13 Increased In Recent Years, Study Finds

Healio (1/8, Weldon) reports, “The percentage of girls and boys who initiated the HPV vaccine series before age 13 increased in recent years, according to” a study. Notably, “the percentage of those who completed the entire series by age 13 also increased but remained below 40%,” researchers found. The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Residential Addiction Treatment Centers Serving Adolescents Are Scarce And Expensive In The US, Study Suggests

Healio (1/8, Weldon) reports, “Residential addiction treatment centers serving adolescents are scarce and expensive in the United States, new study findings suggest, despite increasing overdose rates among young people in recent years.” The findings were published in Health Affairs.

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TV Screen Time Exposure Among Children Under Age Two Could Be Linked To Heightened Risk For Atypical Sensory Processing, Study Suggests

ABC News (1/8, Zhang) reports, “For children under the age of 2, television screen time is associated with sensory differences later in toddlerhood, according to a new study.” Notably, “children who watched any television or DVDs at 12 months of age were twice as likely by 36 months to experience ‘atypical sensory processing’ … compared to others of that age.” According to the research, “after 18 months of age, each extra hour of screen exposure per day was associated with around a 20% increased likelihood of sensory processing differences.” The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics. HealthDay (1/8, Mundell) and MedPage Today (1/8, Henderson) also cover the story.

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Maternal Type 1 Diabetes Emerged As Large Contributor To Children’s Risk Of CHD, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (1/5, Lou) reported, “Maternal type 1 diabetes emerged as the larger contributor to the child’s risk of congenital heart defect when considering maternal diabetes and weight status together, a Finnish population-based cohort study found.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Serum Levels Of Zonulin May Be Useful Biomarker For Development Of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity In Children At Genetic Risk Of The Condition, Study Finds

Medwire News (1/5, Piper) reports, “Serum levels of the protein zonulin, high levels of which are associated with increased intestinal permeability, may be a useful biomarker for the development of celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) in children at genetic risk of the condition, suggest findings from the CD-GEMMA study.” Additionally, the findings “indicate that multiple courses of antibiotics, “as a proxy of infections or as a direct effect on the gut”, may increase a child’s risk of CDA by increasing zonulin and intestinal permeability, note” the researchers. The research was published in Pediatrics.

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Black Children And Teens Who Experience Racial Discrimination Online May Develop Symptoms Related To PTSD, Study Finds

NBC News (1/5, Bellamy) reported, “According to a study…Black children and teens who experience racial discrimination online may develop symptoms related to post-traumatic stress disorder.” Investigators “found that children and teens who experienced racism online were more likely to report PTSD symptoms, and that those who developed PTSD symptoms were more likely to report suicidal thoughts,” but “they didn’t find that experiencing online racism directly led to an increased likelihood of suicidal thoughts.” The findings were published in JAMA Psychiatry.

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FDA Says Lead-Contaminated Applesauce Pouches Also Contained Chromium

The AP (1/5, Aleccia) reported, “Recalled cinnamon applesauce pouches that were tied to lead poisoning in hundreds of U.S. children contained an additional contaminant, federal health officials said Friday.” In addition to lead, the FDA “said investigators detected ‘a high level’ of the chemical element chromium, which can be toxic, in WanaBana apple cinnamon fruit puree and in cinnamon collected from the Ecuador factory where the pouches were manufactured.” NBC News (1/5, Lovelace) reported, “As of Dec. 29, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had received 287 confirmed, probable and suspected reports of elevated blood lead levels linked to the pouches across 37 states.” The Hill (1/6, Robertson) reported, “In its update Friday, the FDA said recalled pouches could still be found on shelves of some Dollar Tree and Family Dollar stores as recently as mid-December.”

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More Than One In Five Children On Medicaid Exposed To At Least One Major Drug Interaction Annually, Study Indicates

Healio (1/5, Weldon) reported, “More than one in five children on Medicaid are exposed to at least one major drug interaction annually, according to” a study. The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Mask Mandates Reinstated At Hospitals In At Least Four States Amid Rise In COVID-19, Flu

Reuters (1/4, Brooks) reports, “Hospitals in at least four U.S. states have reinstated mask mandates amid a rise in cases of COVID, seasonal flu and other respiratory illness.” The mandatory masking for both patients and providers has returned at “healthcare facilities in New York, California, Illinois and Massachusetts.”

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JN.1 COVID-19 Variant Becomes Dominant In US

The Hill (1/4, Weixel) reports, “The U.S. is riding another wave of rising COVID-19 infections, as holiday gatherings and a new variant are driving increased transmission.” According to the CDC, “the wastewater viral activity level for COVID-19 is the highest it’s been since the omicron surge in 2022,” while “a new variant called JN.1 has become the most dominant strain and was responsible for about 44 percent of infections nationwide by mid-December, a sharp rise from about 7 percent in late November.” Notably, “the Midwest is experiencing the highest levels of viral activity.”

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Children Born To Women Who Used Acetaminophen While Pregnant Had Delays In Language Development, Study Suggests

HealthDay (1/4, Mundell) reports that “kids born to women who used acetaminophen while pregnant had delays in language development, compared to children born to women who didn’t use the drug.” The findings were published in Pediatric Research.

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High BMI In Late Adolescence Associated With Increased Odds Of Early Chronic Kidney Disease In Young Adulthood, Study Finds

Healio (1/4, Weldon) reports, “A high BMI in late adolescence – even a high-normal BMI – was associated with increased odds of early chronic kidney disease in young adulthood, according to” a study. The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Seizures During Sleep May Play Role In Sudden Unexplained Death In Childhood, Study Finds

The AP (1/4, Neergaard) reports, “Seizures during sleep are a potential cause of at least some cases of sudden unexplained death in childhood, or SUDC, researchers at NYU Langone Health reported Thursday after analyzing home monitoring video that captured the deaths of seven sleeping toddlers.” The study “offers the first direct evidence of a seizure link,” although “scientists also have found that a history of fever-related seizures was about 10 times more likely among the children who died suddenly than among youngsters the same age.” The findings were published in the journal Neurology.

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Hospital Costs Of Inpatient COVID-19 Treatment Increased By More Than Five Times The Overall Rate Of Medical Inflation Over A 2-Year Period, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (1/3, Kahn) reports, “Hospital costs of inpatient COVID-19 treatment increased by more than five times the overall rate of medical inflation over a 2-year period, a large cross-sectional study found.” According to researchers, “the adjusted cost of caring for hospitalized patients with COVID-19 … increased by 26% during the study period, compared to an average increase of 4.7% in medical care costs over the same time.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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COVID Resurgence Less Deadly Compared To Previous Years

The New York Times (1/3, Mandavilli) reports, “The holidays have come and gone, and once again Americans are riding a tide of respiratory ailments, including Covid.” However, “so far, this winter’s Covid uptick seems less deadly than last year’s, and much less so than in 2022, when the Omicron surge ground the nation to a halt.” Nonetheless, “trends in wastewater data, positive tests, emergency department visits, hospitalization rates and deaths point to a rise in infections in all regions of the nation,” according to the CDC.

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Maternal Flu Vaccination During Pregnancy Associated With Reduced Chances Of Flu-Associated ED Visits In Infants, Study Finds

Healio (1/3, Weldon) reports, “Maternal influenza vaccination during pregnancy was associated with reduced chances of influenza-associated ED visits or hospitalizations in infants aged younger than 6 months, according to” a study. The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Atopic Diseases Are Not Associated With Blood Eosinophil Count Early In Childhood, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (1/3, Stong) reports, “Atopic diseases are not associated with blood eosinophil count early in childhood, although a strong association was observed at 6 years of age, according to study findings.” The research was published in Pediatric Allergy and Immunology.

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Flu Cases Continue To Surge As Young Children Return To School

NBC News (1/3, Edwards) reports, “As kids go back to school and families return to a post-holiday routine, flu season is on track to be a rough one in some states, especially in the Southeast and parts of the West, doctors say.” Notably, “thirty-three states are reporting high to very high case counts of influenza-like illnesses, and there have been about 4,500 flu-related deaths, including those of 20 children, since the 2023-24 season began in October.”

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ChatGPT Gave The Wrong Diagnosis For The Majority Of Pediatric Cases, Research Finds

MedPage Today (1/2, Henderson) reports, “A large language model-based chatbot gave the wrong diagnosis for the majority of pediatric cases, researchers found.” According to the study, “ChatGPT version 3.5 reached an incorrect diagnosis in 83 out of 100 pediatric case challenges. Among the incorrect diagnoses, 72 were actually incorrect and 11 were clinically related to the correct diagnosis but too broad to be considered correct.” The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Young Adults, Adolescents Are The Age Groups Most Likely To Discontinue ADHD Medication Within 5 Years, Study Finds

HCP Live (1/2, Derman) reports, “Young adults and adolescents are the age groups most likely to discontinue ADHD medication within 5 years, according to a new study.” Meanwhile, “children had the lowest rates.” The findings were published in The Lancet Psychiatry.

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Transgender And Nonbinary Adolescent Patients Capable Of Asserting Gender-Specific Care Goals In Discussions With Physicians, Study Finds

Healio (1/2, Weldon) reports, “A chart review of transgender and nonbinary adolescent patients demonstrated that they are capable of asserting gender-specific care goals in discussions with physicians,” according to a study. The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Severe Obesity Among Children From Households With Lower Incomes Is Just As Prevalent As It Was A Decade Ago And Trending Upward, Study Indicates

Healio (1/2, Weldon) reports, “Despite years of progress, severe obesity among children from households with lower incomes is just as prevalent as it was a decade ago and trending upward, according to a study.” The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Popular Infant Loungers May Pose Fall Hazard, Suffocation Risk, CPSC Cautions

HealthDay (12/29, Miller) reported, “A popular infant lounger violates U.S. safety standards because it poses a fall hazard and suffocation risk to babies, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission warns.” While “a notice of violation has been issued to the seller, Poetint002 of China, the company has not agreed to recall the loungers or offer consumers a remedy, the CPSC said in a news release.” The agency “said the loungers fail to meet safety requirements because they lack a stand, creating an unsafe sleeping environment for babies.”

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Folic Acid Supplementation Throughout Pregnancy Correlated With Lower Risk Of Early-Onset Kawasaki Disease In Offspring, Study Finds

MedPage Today (1/1, Phend) reports, “Folic acid supplementation throughout pregnancy was correlated with a lower risk of early-onset Kawasaki disease in offspring, a Japanese observational study showed.” The findings were reported in JAMA Network Open.

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Manufacturer Issues Voluntary Recall For Baby Formula Powder From US Market Over Possible Contamination

Reuters (12/31, Timsina) reported, “Reckitt Benckiser Group’s Mead Johnson Nutrition is voluntarily recalling select batches of Nutramigen Powder from the U.S. market due to a possibility of contamination with Cronobacter sakazakii bacteria in product sampled outside the United States, the Food and Drug Administration said on Sunday.” The article added, “Nutramigen Powder, a specialty infant formula for the dietary management of Cows Milk Allergy in 12.6- and 19.8-ounce cans, went through extensive testing by MJN and tested negative for the bacteria, the FDA said.”

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Infants And Toddlers Face Delays In Socio-Emotional Development Due To COVID-19 Pandemic, Study Finds

HCPlive (12/30, Derman) reported exposure to the COVID-19 pandemic among infants and toddlers is “associated with a higher odd of positive Stages Questionnaire Social-Emotional, Second Edition screenings, suggesting the pandemic caused delays in children’s socio-emotional development.” The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Millions Of People Disenrolled During Medicaid “Unwinding” In 2023

NBC News (12/30, Choi, Aguasvivas, Essamuah) reported that many families over the last eight months have had to navigate the process known as Medicaid “unwinding,” as “states have been re-evaluating the eligibility of the program’s enrollees on a vast scale following a three-year pause on eligibility checks during the Covid pandemic.” According to an analysis by KFF, “at least 13 million people had been disenrolled from Medicaid in 2023.” Notably, “just over 70% of Medicaid disenrollments in states with available data were for procedural reasons, such as missing paperwork, the KFF analysis found.”

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Ohio Governor Vetoes Ban On Transgender Care For Minors

The New York Times (12/29, Harmon) reported, “Mike DeWine, the Republican governor of Ohio, vetoed a bill on Friday that would have banned transgender minors from receiving puberty blockers, hormone therapy and surgeries, a rare rejection in what has been a concerted effort by the Republican Party to mobilize cultural conservatives around transgender issues for the 2024 primaries.” The bill also “says medical professionals who provide the care could lose their licenses and be sued,” and “prohibits transgender girls and women from playing on high school and college sports teams that correspond with their gender identity.”

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Six To 12 Months After COVID-19 Infection, Very Few Children Developed Post-COVID-19 Conditions, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (12/29, Kahn) reported, “Six to 12 months after COVID-19 infection, very few children developed post-COVID-19 conditions as defined by the World Health Organization, a prospective Canadian study found.” Notably, “at 6 months after being tested for SARS-CoV-2 in pediatric emergency departments, just 0.52% of children who tested positive had symptoms and changes in quality of life consistent with PCCs, as compared with 0.10% of those testing negative (P=0.02).” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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COVAX To End Following Shift To Routine Immunization Programs

Healio (12/28, Feller) reports, “COVAX, the multinational program launched in 2020 to deliver COVID-19 vaccines to low- and lower-middle income countries, will end on Dec. 31, 2023, as the vaccines shift to routine immunization programs.” The program “has delivered roughly 2 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses to 146 nations and is estimated to have prevented the deaths of at least 2.7 million people, achieving a two-dose coverage of 57% of people in lower-income nations, according to a press release” by “the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance (GAVI), UNICEF and WHO.”

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Effects Of High Blood Pressure During Pregnancy May Be Long-Lasting, Research Suggests

HealthDay (12/28, Miller) reports that “research suggests the effects of high blood pressure during pregnancy may be long-lasting.” Investigators “found that women who developed high blood pressure during pregnancy had tell-tale signs of abnormal heart structure and function up to a decade later.” The findings were published in Hypertension.

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Research Evaluates Benefits, Challenges To Adolescents’ Patient Portal Access

According to Oncology Nurse Advisor (12/28, Moore), “Oncology clinicians reported improved communications with adolescent patients as one of several benefits to using patient portals.” But, “they also identified mixed levels of patient engagement and confidentiality as challenges to using this technology.” The research was published in JCO Clinical Cancer Informatics.

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Physicians Warn Of Upcoming Asthma Inhaler Switch After GSK Says It Will Discontinue Flovent

CNN (12/28, Tirrell) reports, “Starting January 1, a drug that thousands of patients depend on to help them breathe will disappear from pharmacy shelves, and doctors are concerned patients may have delays switching to alternatives and getting them covered by insurance.” GSK, the drug’s manufacturer, “said it’s discontinuing the branded asthma inhaler Flovent, and instead is making an ‘authorized generic’ version, which is identical but without the same branding.” Physicians “say the authorized generic will work just as well as the branded drug, but it doesn’t appear to be covered as widely by insurers.”

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Some Hospital Systems Ill-Prepared To Accommodate Needs Of Transgender-Identifying Youth In Crisis

The AP (12/29, Schoenbaum) reports transgender-identifying youths are sometimes sent to inpatient wards inconsistent with their gender identities. Notably, “North Carolina lacks uniform treatment standards across hospitals and runs low on money and staff with proper training to treat transgender kids in crisis,” while “last-resort measures to support patients…often fail to help them, and sometimes make things worse.”

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COVID-19 Surge Prompts Some Hospitals To Reinstate Mask Requirements

The Hill (12/28, Weixel) reports, “As COVID-19 and other respiratory infections rise across the country, some major health systems are bringing back mask requirements to stop the spread of infections.” This week, “Mass General Brigham, the largest health system in Massachusetts, said it will require masking for health care staff who interact directly with patients in clinical care locations starting Jan. 2.” The move follows similar actions by Boston’s Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital in Washington, DC, and Wisconsin’s UW Health.

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Social Media Companies Made $11B In Ad Revenue From Children Last Year, Study Finds

The AP (12/27, Ortutay, Hadero) reports, “Social media companies collectively made over $11 billion in U.S. advertising revenue from minors last year, according to a study from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health published on Wednesday.” According to researchers, “the findings show a need for government regulation of social media,” which they say “could help alleviate harms to youth mental health and curtail potentially harmful advertising practices that target children and adolescents.”

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Von Willebrand Factor Antigen Is Useful Disease Activity Biomarker In Children With ANCA-Associated Vasculitis, Study Finds

Rheumatology Advisor (12/27, Goldberg) reports, “Von Willebrand factor antigen is a useful disease activity biomarker in children with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis, according to” a study. The findings were published in Rheumatology.

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Elexacaftor/Tezacaftor/Ivacaftor Appeared Safe, Well Tolerated Among Certain Children 12 Years And Older With Cystic Fibrosis, Study Finds

Healio (12/27, Hornick) reports, “Elexacaftor/tezacaftor/ivacaftor appeared safe and well tolerated among kids aged 12 years and older with cystic fibrosis and either F508del/minimal function or F508del/F508del genotypes for up to 144 weeks, according to study results.” Additionally, “improvements seen in earlier studies after 4 weeks or 24 weeks of elexacaftor/tezacaftor/ivacaftor…treatment were sustained when assessed again at the 144-week mark of therapy.” The findings were published in the European Respiratory Journal.

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Nirsevimab Reduced Hospitalizations Among Infants With RSV-Associated Lower Respiratory Tract Infection, Randomized Trial Finds

MedPage Today (12/27, Kahn) reports, “The monoclonal antibody nirsevimab reduced hospitalizations among infants with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated lower respiratory tract infection, the randomized, pragmatic HARMONIE trial showed.” The findings were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Judge Temporarily Blocks Ban On Gender Transition Care For Minors In Idaho

The New York Times (12/27, Betts) reports, “A federal judge in Idaho temporarily blocked the enforcement of a state law on Tuesday that bans gender transition care for minors and threatens medical professionals with a felony conviction if they provide such care, just six days before it was set to take effect.” The law “specifically bans gender transition surgeries, puberty blockers and hormone therapy for those under 18 with gender dysphoria,” and “also makes it a felony for medical professionals to provide the care, with a penalty of up to 10 years in prison.”

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Omalizumab Shows Promise In Protecting Against Severe Reactions In Children With Multiple Food Allergies, Data Show

NBC News (12/27, Carroll) reports, “For people with multiple food allergies, new research suggests that a drug already approved for asthma and chronic hives may protect against severe reactions to peanuts, eggs, milk and other foods.” In an analysis of data from a clinical trial backed by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, “165 children and adolescents who received injections of the drug Xolair [omalizumab] were able to consume higher doses of the foods without triggering an allergic reaction, compared to those who treated with placebos.” The Hill (12/27, Weixel) reports, “If approved, Xolair would be the first medicine to reduce allergic reactions to multiple foods following accidental exposure. The companies said the FDA is expected to make a decision on approval in the first quarter of 2024.”

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Corrective Surgery May Benefit Children With Cerebral Palsy Who Develop Scoliosis, Review Finds

HealthDay (12/22, Mundell) reported, “Children with the motor disorder cerebral palsy can often also develop scoliosis of the spine,” but “a new review shows improvements over the past 15 years in the safety and effectiveness of spinal fusion surgeries that can correct this issue.” The findings were published recently in the journal Spine.

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Amid Surge In Fentanyl Deaths, Experts Push To Make Naloxone Available In Classrooms

CBS News (12/26, Breen) reports, “Amid a rise in overdose deaths and increasing overdoses in young people, educators and experts are taking naloxone into the classroom to try to prevent student deaths.” Monthly “overdose deaths among young people aged 10 to 19 increased by 109% from 2019 to 2021, according to the” CDC. Meanwhile, 90% “of those deaths involved opioids, the CDC said, and 84% involved illicitly manufactured fentanyl. Bystanders were present in two-thirds of the cases, but most provided no overdose response like administering naloxone, which is now available over-the-counter.”

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Five Days Of Oral Antibiotic Treatment For Febrile UTI In Children Noninferior To The Standard 10-Day Course, Randomized Trial Finds

MedPage Today (12/26, Henderson) reports, “Five days of oral antibiotic treatment for febrile urinary tract infections in kids was noninferior to the standard 10-day course, the randomized controlled STOP trial showed.” The results were published in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Vaccine Exemptions At All-Time High, Prompting Concerns

ABC News (12/22, Cobern) reported, “Exemptions for immunizations required in school are on the rise in the U.S., leading to concerns among medical experts that diseases like measles could soon make a comeback in many states.” In November, the CDC “reported that exemptions for immunizations required in school is the highest ever recorded in U.S. history – increasing to an average 3.0% in the 2022-2023 school year, with 10 states now reporting exemptions exceeding 5%.”

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Physicians Seek To Raise Awareness Of Increasingly Early Puberty

NBC News (12/25, Hopkins) reported, “A growing number of children are showing signs of puberty at significantly younger ages than the average,” and “many families may face hurdles in getting diagnoses.” Additionally, starting puberty significantly younger – a condition called precocious puberty – “may have lasting repercussions on a child’s mental and physical development,” as the children “can be mistakenly treated as older and inappropriately sexualized by society.”

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Survey Finds High School Counselors Increasingly Confronting Gaming, Vaping Addictions

HealthDay (12/22, Thompson) reported, “Online gaming and vaping to the point of addiction have become widespread enough that most high school counselors regularly confront these behaviors in today’s teens, a new survey shows.” Notably, “four out of five counselors say they’ve worked with at least one student during the past year who had struggled with problematic use of video games or e-cigarettes,” although “few said they had the training necessary to adequately help their young charges.” The findings were published in the International Journal for the Advancement of Counselling.

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Pediatric Hospital Admission Rates Far Higher For RSV Than For Omicron SARS-CoV-2 Strain Or Influenza, Study Finds

MedPage Today (12/26, Kahn) reports, “A retrospective study revealed that hospital admission rates were far higher for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) than for the Omicron strain of SARS-CoV-2 or influenza A/B in children presenting at Swedish emergency departments from August 2021 to September 2022.” According to researchers, “hospitalization rates were 81.7% for RSV, 31.5% for Omicron, and 27.7% for influenza.” The findings appeared in a JAMA Pediatrics research letter. Healio (12/22, Weldon) also covered the story.

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Hospitals Again Seeing Influx Of Patients With Flu, RSV, COVID-19

Chief Healthcare Executive (12/21, Southwick) reports, “Once again this year, hospitals are seeing a return of the triple-demic, as they see an influx of patients with the flu, RSV and COVID-19.” Some “hospitals are filling up and some providers are revising policies for visitors and staff, with some limiting visitors and requiring masks.”

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Hormonal Implant Increasingly Popular Choice Among Teenagers, CDC Data Show

The New York Times (12/21, Haridasani Gupta) reports, “The hormonal implant, a long-acting reversible contraceptive, is an increasingly popular choice among teenagers, according to data published last week from the” CDC, as “just over 13 percent of sexually active teenage girls used the implant between 2015 and 2019, compared with 0.6 percent between 2006 and 2010.” The implant “is a tiny rod that sits under the skin in the upper arm and releases progestin.”

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Patients Facing Increased Costs For ADHD Medication As Nationwide Drug Shortage Continues

USA Today (12/21, Garzella) reports, “Amid a nationwide ADHD drug shortage, patients are paying significantly more for medication to help them direct their focus at school, work and home.” This “shortage has placed financial pressure on families, forcing them to search for alternatives,” which are often “expensive brand-name drugs.” This “upward trend can” also “be seen in the prices retail community pharmacies pay for several popular ADHD drugs, which a USA TODAY analysis found have outpaced inflation – and in some cases doubled or tripled in price – since Adderall fell into short supply starting in October 2022.”

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Children Who Survive Cancer Have Higher Risk Of Prediabetes, Diabetes, Research Shows

HealthDay (12/21, Mundell) reports that children “who’ve survived cancer face many health challenges, and a heightened risk for diabetes is one of them, new research shows.” The data indicated that “by the time they reached their 40s, almost half (45.5%) of childhood cancer survivors had prediabetes, while 14% had diabetes.” The research was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Disordered Eating Behaviors Were Reported By 42.5% Of Adolescents With T1D Who Currently Use Or Previously Used An Insulin Pump, Study Finds

Healio (12/21, Monostra) reports, “Disordered eating behaviors were reported by 42.5% of adolescents with type 1 diabetes who currently use or previously used an insulin pump, according to” a study. The findings were published in Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics.

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Zonulin Levels Rise In Children In The Months Preceding Diagnosis Of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity, Study Finds

Healio (12/20, Weldon) reports, “Zonulin levels rise significantly in children in the months preceding a diagnosis of celiac disease autoimmunity, suggesting it could be used as a biomarker to screen at-risk children for celiac disease, researchers” found. The investigators “found that children who developed celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA) experienced a significant increase in zonulin in the 18.3 months before CDA compared with those without CDA.” Healio adds, “Zonulin trajectory was influenced only by increasing the number of antibiotic courses, which increased the slope of trajectory of zonulin over time in patients with CDA.” The research was published in Pediatrics.

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CISA Assessment Reveals Areas Where Cybersecurity Needs To Be Improved

HealthIT Security (12/20, McKeon) reports, “The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA) published a cybersecurity advisory based on key findings that the agency uncovered during a risk and vulnerability assessment (RVA) conducted at a healthcare organization in early 2023.” The results of the investigation “revealed improvement areas that CISA says can be applied to the entire sector, from asset management to identity and vulnerability management.” The agency said that “during internal penetration testing, the team exploited misconfigurations, weak passwords, and other issues through multiple attack paths to compromise the organization’s domain.”

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Gallup Poll Finds COVID-19 Boosters Lagging Behind Flu Vaccines

The Hill (12/20, Irwin) reports, “Less than half of U.S. adults say they have gotten the annual flu shot this year and even less received the most recent COVID-19 booster shot, according to a new survey.” The Gallup poll “found that 47 percent of adults said they got the flu shot and 29 percent received the newest COVID-19 booster.” Additionally, “20 percent of respondents said they still plan to get the updated booster shot – but have not yet – and about half, 51 percent, say they do not plan to get the updated COVID-19 vaccine.”

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ACA Plan Enrollment 33% Higher Than This Time Last Year, CMS Says

Reuters (12/20, Roy) reports, “More than 15.3 million Americans have signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) for 2024, a 33% increase from this time last year, according to data released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services on Wednesday.” The White House “said preliminary data also projects that over 19 million people will enroll in 2024 through the ACA marketplace.” The Hill (12/20, Weixel) reports that if 19 million people enroll, it would be “an increase of 7 million compared to when President Biden took office.” ACA “open enrollment usually runs to Jan. 15, but since that’s a federal holiday in 2024, consumers will have until midnight Jan. 16 to enroll in coverage that starts Feb. 1.”

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Many States Disposing Of Excess, Expiring Protective Gear Left Over From COVID-19 Pandemic

The AP (12/20, Peltz, Lieb) reports, “When the coronavirus pandemic took hold in an unprepared US, many states…scrambled for masks and other protective gear,” but now they are “trying to deal with an excess of protective gear, ditching their supplies in droves.” In Ohio, “with expiration dates passing and few requests to tap into the stockpile,” the state “auctioned off 393,000 gowns for just $2,451 and ended up throwing away another 7.2 million, along with expired masks, gloves and other materials” that “had cost about $29 million in federal money.” So far, “an Associated Press investigation found that at least 15 states…have tossed some of their trove of PPE because of expiration, surpluses and a lack of willing takers.”

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Health Experts Urge More Parents To Vaccinate Children As Waivers Hit All-Time High

The AP (12/20, Shastri) reports, “All states require children to have certain routine vaccines to go to public school, and often private school and day care, to prevent outbreaks of once-common childhood diseases like measles, mumps, whooping cough, chickenpox and polio.” However, “all provide exemptions for children who have a medical reason for avoiding the shots,” and “most also offer waivers for religious beliefs. Fifteen allow a waiver for any personal belief.” This past school year, “vaccination waivers among kindergartners hit an all-time high: 3% in total, according to a recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report.” As a result, “health experts say interventions on every level are needed to get more kids immunized: doctors talking to parents, social media campaigns, easier access to vaccines in some areas, enforcement by schools in others.”

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Study Finds Light Physical Activity Linked To Lower Cholesterol Levels Among Adolescents And Young Adults

Healio (12/20, Monostra) reports, “Adolescents and young adults who partake in more light physical activity have lower cholesterol levels, according to a study published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.” Researchers also found “fat mass partly mediated the associations between light physical activity and LDL cholesterol by 13%, triglycerides by 28% and total cholesterol by 6%.”

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Study Evaluates Nurse Practitioner Satisfaction With In-Person Visits Compared To Telehealth Care

Oncology Nurse Advisor (12/19, Garlapow) reports, “Nurse practitioners (NPs) who exclusively delivered telehealth care expressed higher satisfaction with chronic care delivery compared with those using both in-person and telehealth methods. However, NPs utilizing both approaches showed greater satisfaction regarding interpersonal manner and communication, in contrast to those delivering solely in-person care.” Nonetheless, “most NPs employing both methods preferred in-person care delivery. These study results were published in the Journal of the American Association of Nurse Practitioners.”

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Mycophenolate Mofetil Possible Alternative To Steroids For Induction Therapy In Children With Steroid-Sensitive Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome, Study Finds

Healio (12/19, Carter) reports, “Mycophenolate mofetil may be a viable alternative to steroids for induction therapy in children with steroid-sensitive idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, researchers found in a study.” Published in Kidney Medicine, the study found “30% of patients in the MMF group and 3% in the control group developed a relapse (P = .04) during the induction phase. Moreover, 70% of patients in the MMF group and 61% in the control group experienced a relapse during follow-up (P = .72), the researchers found.”

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Biologic Agents Linked To Decrease In Pediatric Asthma Hospital Admissions, Reduction In Oral Corticosteroid Use Among Children With Asthma, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (12/19, Estrada) reports, “Biologic agents are linked to a decrease in pediatric asthma hospital admissions as well as a reduction in oral corticosteroid (OCS) use in children with asthma, according to study findings published in Pediatric Pulmonology.” In the study, “omalizumab was the most commonly prescribed biologic agent (80.4%).”

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Maternal Influenza Vaccination Effective At Protecting Infants Under Six Months Against Severe Disease, Study Shows

MedPage Today (12/19, Henderson) reports, “Maternal influenza vaccination was effective at protecting infants under 6 months against severe disease, a case-control study showed.” Published in JAMA Pediatrics, the study indicated that “overall effectiveness was 34% (95% CI 12-50) against markers of severe disease – hospitalizations and emergency department (ED) visits combined.” However, “effectiveness was significant for hospitalizations (39%, 95% CI 12-58) but not for ED visits in secondary analyses, according to” the research team.

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Federal Departments Update Amount Each Party Must Pay To Resolve Surprise Medical Bills Through IDR Process

RevCycle Intelligence (12/19, LaPointe) reports, “The Departments of Health and Human Services, Labor, and the Treasury (the Departments) have updated the amount each party must pay to resolve surprise medical bills through the federal independent dispute resolution (IDR) process.” These “departments said in a final rule…that each party will have to pay $115 for disputes initiated on or after Jan. 20th, or 30 days after the publication of the final rule in the Federal Register.” Additionally, “the final rule…solidified future certified IDR entity fees, finalizing a fee between $200 and $840 for single determinations and a fee between $268 and $1,173 for batched determinations.”

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WHO Classifies JN.1 COVID-19 Strain A “Variant Of Interest”

Reuters (12/19, Roy) reports, “The World Health Organization (WHO) on Tuesday classified the JN.1 coronavirus strain as a ‘variant of interest’ and said current evidence shows risk to public health was low from the strain.” Experts have “told Reuters that while the strain can evade the immune system and transmit more easily than other currently circulating variants, it has not shown any signs of more severe disease.” CNN (12/19, Goodman) reports that in the US, the CDC “estimates that the coronavirus subvariant JN.1 is now causing about 20% of new Covid-19 infections in this country, and it’s the fastest-growing strain of the virus.” The new variant “is descended from BA.2.86, or Pirola, a subvariant that came to the world’s attention over the summer because of the large number of changes to its spike proteins: more than 30.” Compared to BA.2.86, “JN.1 has only one change to its spike protein…but that seems to have been enough to make it a fitter and faster virus.” The Hill (12/19, Weixel) reports, “The prevalence of JN.1 more than doubled between late November and mid-December, according to agency estimates, likely aided by holiday travel and gatherings. But it does not appear to be driving increases in hospitalizations.”

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Almost 75% Of Parents Making Resolutions To Improve Parenting In New Year, Poll Finds

HealthDay (12/18, Thompson) reports, “Nearly three in four parents say they will adopt a resolution or personal goal in the coming year, and over half say their tween or teen child will do the same, according to the University of Michigan Health C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital National Poll on Children’s Health.” Almost “half of mothers and a third of fathers say they’ve made goals to improve their parenting, the poll found. Of those, more than thee in four want to exercise more patience and more than half want to spend less time on their phone.” The results were announced in a press release.

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At-Home Telemonitoring Of Lung Function In Children With CF Can Detect Early Onset Of Pulmonary Exacerbations, Study Finds

Cystic Fibrosis News Today (12/18, Bryson) reports, “At-home telemonitoring of lung function in children with cystic fibrosis (CF) can detect the early onset of pulmonary exacerbations, or a sudden worsening of lung symptoms, and may help in determining the likelihood of a child’s response to treatment, a study reported.” In the study, published in Pediatrics, “worse FEV1 responses (a low FEV1 after treatment versus FEV1 at baseline) were seen in patients with a delayed start of treatment after an FEV1 drop. Likewise, a faster decline in lung function before treatment correlated with a low FEV1 response after treatment.”

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More Parents Planning To Vaccinate Children Against RSV, Flu Than COVID-19, Poll Finds

HealthDay (12/18, Thompson) reports, “Most parents plan to have their kids vaccinated against influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), even as COVID-19 vaccine acceptance flags, a new poll finds.” According to the survey published in Vaccine, “seven in 10 parents (71%) plan to have their children get an RSV jab and six in 10 (63%) plan to get their kids the flu vaccine,” while “just 40% say they’ll get their kids vaccinated against COVID.”

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Clinical Model Can Predict RSV Infant Hospitalization Risk, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (12/18, Stong) reports, “Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infant hospitalization risk can be predicted by a newly developed clinical model, according to study findings published in The Lancet Digital Health.” According to the study, “parents’ psychiatric diagnoses and substance use disorders were associated with an increased risk for RSV hospital admission.”

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HHS Urges States To Do More To Keep Children, Families From Losing Medicaid Coverage

The Hill (12/18, Weixel) reports, “The Biden administration is calling on states that have dropped the highest numbers of children from Medicaid to take advantage of numerous federal policies to ensure families can regain coverage and don’t fall through the cracks.” In a letter, HHS said, “States that take up proven flexibilities and strategies from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) are better able to protect kids’ coverage – especially when the state has also expanded Medicaid.” Politico (12/18, Cirruzzo) reports the letter from HHS Secretary Xavier Becerra was “sent Monday to the governors of Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Montana, New Hampshire, Ohio, South Dakota and Texas.” According to the department, “the nine states are responsible for 60 percent of children’s coverage losses between March and September.” The letter outlined options such as “allowing states to use enrollee information they have to auto-renew coverage.”

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Study Finds Severe Obesity Rate Increasing Among Young Children In The US

The AP (12/18, Stobbe) reports, “A new study adds to evidence that severe obesity is becoming more common in young U.S. children.” According to a study published in Pediatrics, which looked at children in the Women, Infants and Children program, “researchers found that 2.1% of kids in the program were severely obese in 2010. Six years later, the rate had dipped to 1.8%. But by 2020, it was 2%.” HealthDay (12/18, Thompson) reports, “That’s about 33,000 of the more than 1.6 million kids in the program.” The study “jibes with other studies that have noted an uptick in severe obesity among young kids, as high as 2.9% of 2- to 4-year-olds in 2018, the researchers said in background notes.”

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FDA Approves Expanded Indication For Tralokinumab-ldrm To Include Adolescents With Atopic Dermatitis

Healio (12/15, Schaffer) reported, “The FDA approved an expanded indication for tralokinumab-ldrm to include children aged 12 to 17 years with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis not adequately controlled with topical therapies, according to a press release from Leo Pharma.” The drug “is the first and only FDA-approved biologic that specifically binds to and inhibits the interleukin-13 cytokine, one of the key drivers of AD signs and symptoms, according to the release.”

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Rate Of E-Cigarette Use Increased Fivefold Among Pregnant Adolescents From 2016 To 2021, Study Finds

Healio (12/15, Weldon) reported, “The rate of e-cigarette use increased more than fivefold among adolescents in late pregnancy from 2016 to 2021, according to a study published in JAMA Network Open.” In the study, researchers “found that the weighted prevalence of exclusive e-cigarette use during late pregnancy increased from 0.8% in 2016 to 4.1% in 2021, whereas the prevalence of exclusive cigarette use decreased from 9.2% in 2017 to 3.2% in 2021.”

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Incidence Of Hospital-Associated Respiratory Virus Infections Higher Among Pediatric Patients Than Adult Patients, Study Finds

Healio (12/15, Stulpin) reported, “The incidence of hospital-associated respiratory virus infections [HARVI] was higher among pediatric patients compared with adult patients, according to a study of patients at University of Michigan hospitals.” According to the study published in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, “HARVI incidences were 8.8 per 10,000 admission days for pediatric patients and 3 per 10,000 admission days for adult patients.”

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CDC Data Show Most Firearms In Unintentional Child Deaths Are Left Loaded, Unlocked

Healio (12/15, Weldon) reported, “Most firearms used in unintentional firearm deaths among children in the United States are stored loaded and unlocked, and deaths most often occur when a shooter is playing with or showing a firearm to someone else, CDC data show.” Published in the MMWR, data show “unintentional firearm injuries to children are inflicted by others 53% of the time.”

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CMS Invests $17M Over 10 Years For States To Test Medicaid Initiatives To Improve Maternal Health

Modern Healthcare (12/15, Hardnett, Subscription Publication) reported, “The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services is offering states money to test Medicaid initiatives designed to tackle the maternal health crisis, the agency announced Friday.” The agency “will provide up to $17 million over 10 years to as many as 15 states to establish what CMS describes as a holistic approach to childbirth and postpartum care that addresses patients’ physical, mental and social needs. Medicaid covers about 40% of childbirths.” RevCycle Intelligence (12/15, Bailey) reported, “We have heard loud and clear that many women do not feel listened to or supported during their birth experience, and the current rate of maternal morbidity and mortality is deeply concerning,” CMS Deputy Administrator and Innovation Center Director Liz Fowler said in a press release.

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Study Finds “Couch Potato” Children Can Become Young Adults With Heart Issues

HealthDay (12/15, Mundell) reported, “Hours plunked down in front of the TV or staring at a phone screen in childhood could bring poor heart health decades later, a new study shows.” According to the findings published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, researchers “calculate that this lack of physical activity contributed to 70% of the rise in cholesterol.”

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CDC Issues Alert Urging Increased Respiratory Vaccine Coverage

Reuters (12/14) reports the CDC “on Thursday issued an alert urging healthcare [clinicians] to increase immunization coverage for influenza, COVID-19 and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV).” According to the agency, “low vaccination rates, coupled with ongoing increases in respiratory disease activity, could lead to more severe disease and increased healthcare capacity strain in the coming weeks.” CNN (12/14, McPhillips) also covers the story.

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Drugmakers Agree To Supply Additional RSV Immunization Doses To US Market

Reuters (12/14, Hunnicutt, Erman, Jackson) reports, “The makers of a respiratory syncytial virus immunization for infants that has been in tight supply will deliver an additional 230,000 doses in January, the White House said on Thursday, after U.S. government officials met with the companies to discuss meeting winter demand.” The new doses of the RSV shot Beyfortus (nirsevimab) “are from supply originally intended for the Southern Hemisphere RSV season, which will be replenished before that season starts later next year, a Sanofi spokesperson said.” The Hill (12/14, Weixel) also covers the story.

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Interactive Screen Time Particularly Harmful For Teen’s Sleep, Study Finds

HealthDay (12/14, Mundell) reports, “Any type of time spent looking at screens before bed is bad for kids’ sleep, but…research shows that ‘interactive’ screen time – texting and video games, for example – is especially harmful.” According to researchers, “the total time per day spent texting/gaming mattered, too,” as “for each hour during the day that teens played video games beyond their usual amount, sleep that evening was delayed by 10 minutes.” The findings were published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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American Children Increasingly At Risk Of Unintentional Deaths From Firearms, CDC Report Finds

HealthDay (12/14, Mundell) says that unintentional firearm injuries “have occurred in American homes hundreds of times over the past two decades, killing 1,262 children, according to a sobering new report” from the CDC’s National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. According to researchers, firearms used in these incidents “were often stored loaded (74%) and unlocked (76%) and were most commonly accessed from nightstands and other sleeping areas.” The report was published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Survey Finds More Than 60% Of 12th Graders Reported Not Using Alcohol, Cannabis Or Nicotine In The Past 30 Days

Healio (12/14, Weldon) reports, “More than 60% of 12th graders who responded to a yearly survey of junior high and high school students reported not using alcohol, cannabis or nicotine in the past 30 days – the highest level of abstention in the survey’s history.” Notably, “rates of lifetime abstention … significantly increased in 2023 among 10th and 12th graders and were at or near the highest levels ever recorded by Monitoring the Future, a survey conducted yearly by the University of Michigan and funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse.”

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About 11% Of Visitors To Trampoline Parks In Australia, Middle East Experienced Significant Injury, Study Finds

Healio (12/13, Weldon) reports, “About 11% of visitors to trampoline parks in Australia and the Middle East experienced a significant injury, according to findings from an Australian study.” The results were published in Pediatrics.

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Drug Abuse May Contribute To Rise In Heart Infections Among Young Adults, Research Suggests

HealthDay (12/13, Mundell) reports, “While rates of a deadly heart infection are dropping generally across the United States, a new report finds one exception: Young adults.” For that age group, “rates of infective endocarditis are rising, probably fueled by a common cause, injected drug abuse.” The findings were published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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HHS Finalizes Transparency Rule For AI Use In Health IT Software

Modern Healthcare (12/13, Desilva, Subscription Publication) reports that HHS “finalized a rule on Wednesday that sets transparency standards on the development of artificial intelligence in health IT software.” According to the agency, “the ‘Health Data, Technology, and Interoperability: Certification Program Updates, Algorithm Transparency, and Information Sharing’ rule sets technical transparency and risk-management requirements for some healthcare software systems that use AI and other predictive algorithms.”

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Teenagers Who Avidly Use Marijuana Typically Use It Either For Enjoyment Or To Cope, But Both Uses Have “Dark Side” To Them, Study Finds

HealthDay (12/13, Thompson) reports, “Teens who avidly use weed typically use it either for enjoyment or to cope, but both uses have a dark side to them, new research finds.” Notably, “teenagers who use marijuana for enjoyment or to forget their problems have more demand for it, meaning that they are willing to both consume more weed when it’s free and spend more money to obtain it, researchers said.” The findings were published in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors.

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Smartwatches Increasingly Used By Cardiac Specialists To Help Diagnose Heart Problems In Children, Research Suggests

HealthDay (12/13, Thompson) reports, “Smartwatches are being increasingly used by cardiac specialists to help diagnose heart problems in children, researchers report.” According to a review of medical records at Stanford Medicine Children’s Health, “41 young patients had arrhythmias detected by a smartwatch,” while “23 had received a notification from the watch about a high heart rate between 2018 and 2022.” The findings were published in Communications Medicine.

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Studies Link Use Of Marijuana During Pregnancy To Adverse Maternal, Neonatal Outcomes

NBC News (12/12, Carroll) reports, “Women who use marijuana during pregnancy may be putting their babies’ health at risk, with risk increasing as use goes up, a…study suggests.” According to an analysis of data from more than 9,000 moms-to-be from the US, “cannabis exposure during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of unhealthy outcomes, especially low birth weight.” Notably, “the more cannabis moms-to-be consumed, the higher the risk, according to the report.” The findings were published in JAMA. In similar findings, Healio (12/12, Welsh) reports, “In utero cannabis exposure was linked to increased risks for low birth weight, small for gestational age, preterm birth and NICU admission.” Those findings were published in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

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Study Finds Pediatric Patients With Severe Atopic Dermatitis Experienced Higher Rates Of Itch, Pain, Sleep Disturbances And Missed School Days Compared With Those With Mild Disease

Healio (12/12, Capaldo) reports, “Pediatric patients with severe atopic dermatitis experienced higher rates of itch, pain, sleep disturbances and missed school days compared with those with mild disease, according to a study.” The findings were published in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Rates Of Morbidity And Mortality Among Very Preterm Infants In The US Have Continued To Decrease But At A Slower Pace In Recent Years, Study Indicates

Healio (12/12, Rose Weldon) reports, “Rates of morbidity and mortality among very preterm infants in the United States have continued to decrease but at a slower pace in recent years, and the rate of chronic lung disease has increased, according to study findings.” The results were published in Pediatrics.

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Long-Term Dupilumab Treatment Is Acceptably Safe, Reduces Severe Exacerbations In Children With Asthma, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (12/12, Stong) reports, “Long-term dupilumab treatment was well tolerated, acceptably safe, and reduced severe exacerbations in children aged 6 to 11 years with moderate to severe asthma, according to a study.” According to the researchers, “dupilumab not only reduced severe exacerbation rates and type 2 inflammatory biomarkers (eg, serum total IgE and blood eosinophil counts), but is the first biological approved for this age group that also showed consistent and clinically significant improvements in lung function.” The findings were published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

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USPSTF Recommends Children With Obesity Should Receive Intensive Counseling To Promote Healthy Diet, Exercise Habits Starting At Age Six

Reuters (12/12, Lapid) reports, “Children with obesity should receive intensive counseling to promote healthy diet and exercise habits starting at age 6, according to a draft recommendation” issued by the US Preventive Services Task Force on Wednesday. In 2017, the USPSTF “had recommended … that screening for obesity start at age 6.” However, “research since then has shown the effectiveness of intensive behavioral interventions … for achieving a healthy weight and improving the quality of life for children and adolescents, the panel said.” CNN (12/12, Christensen) reports, “The task force’s draft recommendations do not include weight loss medications or surgery, although it has looked at some research on those interventions.” MedPage Today (12/12, Monaco) also covers the story.

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Janus Kinase Inhibitor May Preserve Beta-Cell Function For Children, Young Adults Recently Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes, Study Finds

Healio (12/11, Monostra) reports, “A Janus kinase inhibitor may preserve beta-cell function for children and young adults recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, according to” a study. The findings were published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

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High BMI At Ages 16 To 20 Associated With CKD In Early Adulthood, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (12/11, Henderson) reports, “High body mass index at ages 16 to 20 was associated with chronic kidney disease in early adulthood, a large cohort study showed.” The findings were reported in JAMA Pediatrics.

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In Neonates With Acquired In Utero HIV Infection, Administration Of ART Within 48 Hours Of Life Can Lead To Sustained HIV Virological Suppression By Two Years, Study Finds

MedPage Today (12/11, Kahn) reports, “In neonates with acquired in utero HIV infection, administration of antiretroviral therapy within 48 hours of life can lead to sustained HIV virological suppression by 2 years, a phase I/II proof-of-concept study indicated.” The findings were published in The Lancet HIV.

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Infants Exposed To Second-Line Antidiabetic Therapy In Utero Do Not Face Increased Risk Of Major Congenital Malformations At Birth, Analysis Finds

HCPlive (12/11, Kunzmann) reports, “Infants exposed to second-line antidiabetic therapy including GLP-1 agonists in utero do not face an increased risk of major congenital malformations at birth, according to new data from an observational cohort analysis.” The findings were published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

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States Work To Improve Medicaid Eligibility Redeterminations

Modern Healthcare (12/11, Bennett, Subscription Publication) reports, “State Medicaid agencies, under intensifying federal scrutiny as millions of people lose coverage, say they are stepping up efforts to identify who should and shouldn’t be enrolled as they continue eligibility redeterminations.” Since April, “states have removed nearly 12 million people from Medicaid,” and “more than 70% of disenrollments have been for procedural reasons, not because states determined the enrollees earn too much to qualify.” Now, “states are making major efforts to restore Medicaid coverage to beneficiaries after the disenrollments, including campaigns to find people and the creation of systems to determine who is eligible, experts and state officials said.”

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Trial Finds No Less Need For Intubation Among Newborns Born Preterm Who Were Given Prophylactic Oropharyngeal Surfactant At Birth To Ward Off Respiratory Failure

MedPage Today (12/11, Short) reports, “There was no less need for intubation among newborns born preterm who were given prophylactic oropharyngeal surfactant at birth to ward off respiratory failure, a randomized clinical trial found.” The research found “infants randomized to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy with or without oropharyngeal surfactant therapy shared similar rates of being intubated within 120 hours for persistent apnea, bradycardia, or respiratory failure.” The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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WHO Expresses Concern About Spread Of Mpox In Congo

Reuters (12/8, Rigby) reported that the World Health Organization “is ‘very worried’ about the spread of a severe form of mpox that has killed nearly 600 people, mainly children, in the Democratic Republic of Congo this year, a senior official said.” The DRC “has reported over 13,000 cases in 2023, more than twice as many as during the last peak in 2020, with the disease occurring in almost every province.” According to Reuters, the WHO “is working with the authorities on the response and a risk assessment.”

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Study Shows Interventions To Increase Vaccination Rates Among Women During Pregnancy Have Small Effect On Influenza Vaccine Uptake, Are Ineffective For Pertussis Vaccine Uptake

Infectious Disease Advisor (12/8, Kuhns) reported results of a study “show that interventions to increase vaccination rates among women during pregnancy have a small effect on influenza vaccine uptake and are ineffective for pertussis vaccine uptake.” The findings were published in the Journal of Travel Medicine.

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FDA Approves Two Gene Therapies For Sickle Cell Disease

The New York Times (12/8, A1, Kolata) reported that the FDA on Friday “approved the first gene editing therapy ever to be used in humans for sickle cell disease, a debilitating blood disorder caused by a single mutated gene.” However, the Times noted, “the obstacles to treatment are myriad: an extremely limited number of medical centers authorized to provide it; the requirement that each patient’s cells be edited or have a gene added individually; procedures that are so onerous that not everyone can tolerate them; and a multimillion-dollar price tag and potential insurance obstacles.” NBC News (12/8, Kopf, Lovelace) reported, “The therapy, called Casgevy, from Vertex Pharmaceuticals and CRISPR Therapeutics, is the first medicine to be approved in the United States that uses the gene-editing tool CRISPR, which won its inventors the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2020.” The FDA “also approved a second treatment for sickle cell disease, called Lyfgenia, a gene therapy from drugmaker Bluebird Bio.”

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FDA Faces Renewed Criticism After Children Sickened By Contaminated Applesauce Pouches

The Washington Post (12/9, A1, Morris, Amenabar, Reiley, Portnoy) reported that contaminated pouches of cinnamon applesauce recently “sparked an international investigation” by the FDA “and a massive national recall of cinnamon applesauce pouches manufactured by an Ecuador-based company, Austrofood.” Now, “state health and environment officials have told The Post that they are investigating at least 118 confirmed or suspected cases in 31 states believed to be linked to the popular snacks.” The recall has also “renewed questions about whether the FDA is doing enough to regulate toxic metals in baby and toddler foods.”

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Prenatal Infection With Common Respiratory Viruses Transmitted From Mother Tied To Poorer Growth, Study Finds

MedPage Today (12/8, Short) reported, “Prenatal infection with common respiratory viruses transmitted from the mother was associated with poorer growth, a prospective cohort study found.” The research found “postnatal weight change significantly correlated with maternal blood respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) copy numbers and titers of SARS-CoV-2 in blood from both mother and baby.” The findings were published in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

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Administering Emicizumab To Infants With Severe Hemophilia A Is Effective, Safe, Research Suggests

MedPage Today (12/10, Bassett) reports, “Administering emicizumab (Hemlibra) to previously untreated or minimally treated infants with severe hemophilia A without factor VIII inhibitors is effective and safe, according to results from research.” The “study showed that at a median follow-up of 101.9 weeks, the annualized treated bleeding rate was 0.4…among 55 study participants, with 30 children (54.5%) having no treated bleeds.” The findings were presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology.

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More Than One-Third Of Women Globally Experience Lasting Health Problems Caused By Childbirth, Study Indicates

CNN (12/7, Gretener) reports, “Expansive…research says that more than a third of women globally experience lasting health problems caused by childbirth, saying the conditions are often ‘neglected’ and ‘ignored.’” The study found that many complications after birth are rarely acknowledged, including pain during sex (35%), “low back pain (32%), anal incontinence (19%), urinary incontinence (8-31%), anxiety (9-24%), depression (11-17%), perineal pain (11%) and fear of childbirth (6-15%).” The findings were published in The Lancet Global Health.

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White House Urges Drugmakers To Increase Production Of Infant RSV Shots

Reuters (12/7, Heavey, Jackson, Erman) reports, “U.S. officials met with manufacturers of the infant and toddler RSV immunization Beyfortus [nirsevimab] this week seeking to boost access to the shot, the White House said in a statement on Thursday after senior Biden administration officials met with the companies last week.” According to the White House, “the companies have committed to producing tens of thousands of additional RSV immunizations for infants and sped up the release of 77,000 doses of the drug so far.”

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Treatment With GnRH Agonists Followed By Long-Term Gender-Affirming Hormones Associated With Similar Pre- And Post-Treatment Bone Health Among Transgender Adolescents, Study Finds

Endocrinology Advisor (12/7, Nye) reports, “Treatment with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists followed by long-term gender-affirming hormones is associated with similar pre- and post-treatment bone health among transgender adolescents, according to” a study. The findings were published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Low COVID-19 Vaccination Rates Result In Fewer Doses At Pediatricians’ Offices

CNN (12/7, Musa) reports, “During the Covid-19 public health emergency, coronavirus vaccines were purchased by the federal government and distributed to doctor’s offices.” Now, “doctors must pay for the shots up-front, and low uptake of the updated vaccine has led some pediatricians to skip ordering it, sometimes making shots difficult for parents to find.” According to the CDC, “less than 3% of children 6 months to 4 years and 10% of children 12 to 17 have received the new shot” as of November 25.

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Children Who Received Two Or More Doses Of COVID-19 Messenger RNA Vaccine Were 40% Less Likely To Be Hospitalized Due To The Disease, Study Finds

Healio (12/7, Weldon) reports, “Children who received two or more doses of COVID-19 messenger RNA vaccine were 40% less likely to be hospitalized or visit an ED due to the disease, according to” a study. The findings were published in Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.

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Incidence Of Sudden Cardiac Death Among College Athletes Has Dropped Over Past Two Decades, Research Suggests

Healio (12/6, Kalvaitis) reports “the incidence of sudden cardiac death among National Collegiate Athletic Association athletes decreased over the past 2 decades, researchers reported.” The research found that “although overall incidence declined, the incidence of sudden cardiac death ‘remains astronomically high’ in certain subgroups, including men, Black athletes, and those who play basketball and football.” The findings were presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions.

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Second Death Raises More Concerns About Ultra-Caffeinated Drinks

The Washington Post (12/6, Kasulis Cho) reports, “A second death linked to a caffeinated ‘Charged Lemonade’ drink sold by the cafe-bakery chain Panera Bread has raised questions about the safety of ultra-caffeinated drinks and how much caffeine is too much.” However, “experts say that a person’s tolerance for caffeine – as well as its benefits or risks – can vary widely, depending on their habits, size, overall health and other factors.”

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White House Pushes Decision On Banning Menthol Cigarettes To 2024

The New York Times (12/6, Jewett, Stolberg, Fahrenthold) reports, “The Biden administration delayed a decision on Wednesday about whether it would ban menthol cigarettes amid intense lobbying from tobacco companies, convenience stores and industry-backed groups that contend that billions of dollars in sales and jobs will be lost.” The AP (12/6, Perrone) reports, “Administration officials indicated Wednesday the process will continue into next year, targeting March to implement the rule, according to an updated regulatory agenda posted online.” Meanwhile, some anti-smoking groups “warned on Wednesday that the proposal, which would give cigarette companies one year to phase out the flavor, could be held up indefinitely.” NBC News (12/6, Edwards) and The Hill (12/6, Weixel) also cover the story.

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Preterm Infants Faced Increased Risk For Appendicitis In The First Year Of Life, Study Indicates

Healio (12/6, Weldon) reports, “Preterm infants faced an increased risk for appendicitis in the first year of life, according to a study.” The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Hospitalizations Rising For Pediatric Patients With Eating Disorders, Study Finds

CNN (12/6, Holcombe) reports, “Clinicians, researchers and activists have stressed the need for better treatment and services of people with eating disorders who don’t fit the stereotypical patient profile – and recent data suggests a growing need.” A study tracked pediatric eating disorder hospitalizations in Ontario between April 2002 and March 2020, finding that “hospitalizations generally increased over that time, rising by 139% from 2002 to 2019.” The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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Over 200 Groups Urge Congress To Pass Kids Online Safety Act Next Year

NBC News (12/6, Tenbarge) reports, “More than 200 organizations sent a letter Wednesday urging Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer to schedule a vote on the Kids Online Safety Act first thing in January when Congress reconvenes.” The bipartisan bill “seeks to create liability, or a ‘duty of care,’ for apps and online platforms that recommend content to minors that can negatively affect their mental health.”

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RSV Infection Presents Significant Burden To Infants, Families, And Society Even When Medical Attendance Is Not Required, Study Finds

Infectious Disease Advisor (12/6) reports RSV infection “presents a significant burden to infants, families, and society even when medical attendance is not required, according to” study results. The findings were published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Shortage Of Antibody Drug For RSV Remains Ongoing

CNN International (12/5, Goodman) reports that when the FDA approved Beyfortus (nirsevimab-alip), a new antibody designed to prevent severe disease in babies with RSV, “AstraZeneca and Sanofi, the two companies that manufacture the drug, said it would be available for babies in time for RSV season this year.” However, “concerns about insurance reimbursement and cost kept many pediatricians and hospitals from ordering right away,” and “just as the CDC and payors had worked out a way to resolve some of those issues … the manufacturers announced that they wouldn’t be able to fill orders.”

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Conservative Oxygenation Targets In PICU Improved Outcomes, Reduced Costs For Ventilated Patients, Trial Finds

MedPage Today (12/5, Short) reports, “Conservative oxygenation targets in the pediatric intensive care unit improved outcomes and reduced costs for ventilated patients, a randomized clinical trial found.” The findings were published in The Lancet.

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For Children With Habitual Snoring And Mild Sleep Apnea, Early Adenotonsillectomy Did Not Improve Executive Function Or Attention Compared With Watchful Waiting, Trial Finds

MedPage Today (12/5, Henderson) reports, “For children with habitual snoring and mild sleep apnea, early adenotonsillectomy did not improve executive function or attention compared with watchful waiting, a randomized clinical trial showed.” The findings were published in JAMA.

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Multiple Infants May Have Fetal Fentanyl Exposure Syndrome

NBC News (12/5, Edwards) reports, “At least 10 babies – possibly more than 12 – have been identified with what” physicians “believe to be a new syndrome related to exposure to fentanyl in the womb.” The infants “have distinctive physical birth defects, such as cleft palate and unusually small heads.” Although no common genetic cause has been uncovered, “all were born to mothers who said they’d used street drugs, particularly fentanyl, while they were pregnant.” HealthDay (12/5, Foster) reports the research was published in Genetics in Medicine Open.

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Rise In Child Suicide Rates May Be Linked To Illicit Opioids, Research Suggests

HealthDay (12/5, Mundell) reports “suicide rates for Americans under the age of 18 are rising at unprecedented rates, and a new report points to a likely culprit: The ongoing epidemic of opioid abuse.” Researchers “found the biggest uptick in” child suicide rates “occurred in states where the shift to illicit opioids was most pronounced” due to conditions in their environments worsening due to the opioid crisis. The findings were published in Demography.

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Study Finds Use Of Antivirals To Treat Influenza In Children Remains Low Despite Their Wide Availability And Guidelines Recommending Their Use

Healio (12/5, Weldon) reports, “Use of antivirals to treat influenza in children remains low despite their wide availability and guidelines recommending their use,” according to a study. The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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AHA Urges Hospitals To Guard Against Citrix Bleed Cybersecurity Vulnerability

HealthIT Security (12/4, McKeon) reports, “Hospitals should take immediate action to protect against the Citrix Bleed cybersecurity vulnerability, the American Hospital Association warned, following multiple alerts by government agencies regarding the aggressive nature of this vulnerability.” The vulnerability “impacts the NetScaler ADC (formerly Citrix ADC) and NetScaler Gateway (formerly Citrix Gateway) and allows threat actors to bypass password protections and multi-factor authentication.”

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Five-Component Intervention In Primary Care Network Reduced Asthma-Related ED Visits Among Patients By 33%, Study Finds

Healio (12/4, Weldon) reports, “A primary care network reduced asthma related ED visits among its patients by one-third over the course of a decade by implementing a five-component intervention,” according to study results. The article adds, “In 2010, there were 21.7 asthma-related ED visits per 1,000 patients per year in the clinics,” and “by 2019, the rate was 14.5 per 1,000 patients per year – a 33% decrease, with two center line shifts over time, according to the researchers.” The findings were published in Pediatrics.

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Non-Hispanic Black Children With Eczema Less Likely To Undergo Skin, Blood Testing To Confirm Food Allergy, Study Finds

Healio (12/4, Sasha Todak) reports, “Non-Hispanic Black children with eczema appeared significantly less likely to undergo skin and blood testing to confirm a food allergy compared with white children, according to results of a retrospective cohort study.” Additionally, “rates of food allergy were higher in non-Hispanic Black children (7.6%) compared with white children (5.3%), but the data did not indicate what food allergy testing was done.” The findings were presented at the ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting.

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Children Born To Women With Infertility Who Utilized Assisted Reproduction Methods Have Higher Risk For Autism Spectrum Disorder, Study Finds

Healio (12/4, Welsh) reports, “Children born to women with infertility who utilized assisted reproduction methods had slightly higher risk for autism spectrum disorder, independent of fertility treatment used,” according to a study. The findings were published in JAMA Network Open.

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CMS May Withhold Medicaid Funding Due To Redeterminations Disenrollments

Modern Healthcare (12/4, Bennett, Subscription Publication) reports that CMS “outlined its plans to get Medicaid redeterminations disenrollments under control in an interim final rule published Monday.” Modern Healthcare adds, “States that fail to comply with federal Medicaid policies as they review their benefit rolls for ineligible enrollees risk reduced federal funding under the regulation, which comes after 11.8 million Medicaid beneficiaries have been removed from the program since April, according to CMS data compiled by KFF.”

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Link Between Childhood BP And Adult Atherosclerosis Appeared Stable Going All The Way Back To Infancy, Study Finds

MedPage Today (12/4, Lou) reports that researchers have found that “the link between childhood blood pressure (BP) and adult atherosclerosis appeared stable going all the way back to infancy, suggesting that efforts to prevent arterial thickening may be beneficial starting at the earliest life stage.” The investigators found “in the STRIP trial, there was a consistent contribution of hypertensive systolic BP across early life stages to carotid intima-media thickness…in young adulthood.” The study, which used ultrasonography, was published in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Certain Specialties Still Have Higher-Than-Average Telehealth Use Despite Drop In Overall Use, Data Show

mHealth Intelligence (12/1, Vaidya) reported that “while telehealth use has dropped nearly 25 percentage points from peak usage in 2020, certain specialties, like mental health, infectious disease, and obstetrics, still have higher-than-average telehealth use, according to new data” from Epic Research. Usage of telehealth “skyrocketed during the initial peak early in the pandemic but has since declined, though usage remains higher than pre-pandemic levels.” The data show “telehealth use encompassed less than 1 percent of all visits in the last three quarters of 2019,” but that “figure jumped to 31.2 percent in Q2 2020 before dropping to 5.8 percent in Q3 2023.”

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Flu Increasing, RSV Lung Infections May Be Peaking In US, Officials Say

The AP (12/1, Stobbe) reported, “Flu is picking up steam while RSV lung infections that can hit kids and older people hard may be peaking, U.S. health officials said Friday.” But COVID-19 “continues to cause the most hospitalizations and deaths among respiratory illnesses – about 15,000 hospitalizations and about 1,000 deaths every week, said” CDC Director Mandy Cohen, MD, MPH. Separately, the CDC “is also looking into reports of pneumonia outbreaks in children in two states, but Cohen said ‘there is no evidence’ that they are due to anything unusual.”

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Youth Baseball May Lead To Elbow Injuries, Study Indicates

HealthDay (12/1, Foster) reported research has found the game of youth baseball “can leave many with elbow pain and injuries.” According to the findings, “throwing a baseball repeatedly stresses the growing bones, joints and muscles of the elbows of players,” with “20% to 40% of youth baseball players between the ages of 9 and 12” complaining of elbow pain at least once during the season. For the study, “the researchers reviewed elbow MRI exams from 130 youth players (18 and younger) being evaluated for elbow pain.” The findings were presented at RSNA 2023.

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Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole For Treatment Of Pediatric Acute Osteoarticular Infection Results In Higher Incidence Of Adverse Events, Study Finds

Infectious Disease Advisor (12/1, Kuhns) reported a study found that “although trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) is not associated with increased risk for clinical failure, it does result in higher incidence of treatment-related adverse events (AEs) when compared with alternative agents for the treatment of pediatric acute osteoarticular infection.” The researchers said, “TMP–SMX might be considered in cases where alternatives are limited and potential benefits are deemed to outweigh the risks of AEs and outpatient and ED [emergency department] return-to care visits.” The findings were published in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society.

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Vitamin D Supplements May Be Less Effective For Children Than Previously Thought, Study Says

Newsweek (12/1, Thompson) reported, “Despite previous assumptions, taking vitamin D doesn’t help children avoid fracturing their bones.” According to research, “even if the child has a vitamin D deficiency, the supplements do not increase bone strength or prevent bone fractures.” The study was published in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

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CDC Director Provides Update On Threat Posed By Respiratory Illnesses

NBC News (11/30, Hayes) reports CDC Director Mandy Cohen reassured members of Congress on Thursday that a respiratory illness in China was not the result of “a new or novel pathogen.” Cohen noted that the surge “can instead be attributed to existing virus…

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Young Children Have Highest Mortality Rate In HIV Treatment, Study Finds

MedPage Today (11/30, Putka) reports, “Children younger than age 5 years with HIV who received antiretroviral treatment died globally at percentages two to nine times higher than older children, a CDC study found.” Notably, “among children receiving ART f…

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Shorter Antibiotic Courses May Be Supported For Pediatric Bacterial Meningitis, Study Finds

Infectious Disease Advisor (11/30) reports that a recent study has found “there are no significant differences between shorter and longer antibiotic courses with respect to outcomes among children with bacterial meningitis, including treatment failure, in…

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Study Indicates Acne Prevalence In Adolescents Linked To Puberty, Skin Color, Weight

Healio (11/30, Capaldo) reports, “Higher acne vulgaris prevalence was associated with puberty status, skin of color and weight gain among adolescents, according to a study.” Notably, “of 4,561 children aged approximately 13 years … the visible acne vulg…

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Prenatal Vaccination May Protect Infants From COVID-19, Study Finds

Healio (11/30, Weldon) reports, “Prenatal vaccination protects infants from COVID-19 up to age 6 months,” according to a real-world study. Researchers “found that vaccine efficacy was 15.4% for infants born to any mothers vaccinated before pregnancy and i…

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Early Skin-To-Skin Contact May Have Health Benefits For Preterm Infants, Study Finds

ABC News (11/30, Jhaveri) reports that early skin-to-skin contact “may have significant health benefits” for babies born prematurely, according to a study. The researchers “found that premature babies who were held close to their mother or father’s skin r…

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Study Finds Progression Independent Of Relapse Activity In Pediatric-Onset MS

MedPage Today (11/29, Putka) reports, “Pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis patients showed progression independent of relapse activity even when they were relatively young, a prospective cohort study found.” According to the findings, “confirmed PIRA event…

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Risk Of Injury In Juvenile Onset Fibromyalgia May Be Increased By Joint Hypermobility, Study Reports

HCPlive (11/29, Pine) reports, “Patients with juvenile onset fibromyalgia and joint hypermobility exhibited small but noticeable differences in biomechanics compared with those without joint hypermobility while performing a landing and jumping exercise,”…

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Sofosbuvir-Based Treatments Effective In Pediatric Patients With HCV, Researchers Find

Healio (11/29, Ghizzone) reports, “Treatment with sofosbuvir-based direct-acting antivirals demonstrated durable sustained virologic response up to 5 years among pediatric patients with hepatitis C virus, according to findings presented at The Liver Meeti…

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Study Evaluates Associations Between Prenatal, Postnatal Exposure To PFAs And Childhood Obesity

Endocrinology Advisor (11/29, Wei) reports, “Prenatal exposure to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl (PFA) substances is not associated with pediatric obesity, whereas postnatal exposure to PFA substances is inversely associated with pediatric obesity, ac…

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Study Highlights Risk Factors For MSSA Colonization, Infection Among Infants In NICU

Infectious Disease Advisor (11/29, Barowski, RN) reports that a surveillance study “showed that the overall rate of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) colonization and subsequent infection is high among infants in the neonatal intensive…

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CPSC Proposes New Safety Requirements For Infant Loungers

NBC News (11/29, Chuck) reports, “The Consumer Product Safety Commission on Wednesday advanced a proposal for the first federal safety requirements for infant loungers, citing dozens of deaths linked to the popular products.” The federal agency “has linke…

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Caregiver Non-English Language Preference May Increase Healthcare Use In Children With Asthma, Study Reports

Healio (11/29, Weldon) reports, “Caregiver non-English language preference is associated with increased health care usage by children with asthma.” The study found that “children with asthma were more likely to be hospitalized for asthma-related health is…

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COVID-19 Vaccines Prevent Premature Births, Study Shows

HealthDay (11/28, Thompson) reports, “COVID vaccines saved the lives and health of countless babies by preventing their premature births, a…study shows.” According to the study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, “COVID-19…

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Number Of COVID-19 Cases Caused By BA.2.86 Variant Has Tripled In Past Two Weeks, CDC Says

HealthDay (11/28, Foster) reports, “The prevalence of a highly mutated COVID variant has tripled in the past two weeks, new government data shows.” Now, nearly 10% of “new COVID cases are fueled by the BA.2.86 variant, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control…

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Dasiglucagon Treatment Reduces Hypoglycemia Measures Among Children With Congenital Hyperinsulinism, Study Finds

Endocrinology Advisor (11/28) reports, “Dasiglucagon treatment reduces hypoglycemia measures among children with congenital hyperinsulinism, according to study findings.” The research was published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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Children Who Have Ulcerative Colitis And Are Undergoing Ileal Pouch-Anal Anastomosis Are At Increased Risk Of Developing Crohn’s Disease, Study Finds

Gastroenterology Advisor (11/28, Khaja) reports that a study indicates that “children diagnosed with ulcerative colitis…and undergoing ileal pouch-anal anastomosis…are at a considerable risk of developing” Crohn’s disease. Investigators found that occ…

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Children Of Mothers With Atopic Dermatitis More Prone To Developing AD, Allergic Illnesses, Study Finds

Healio (11/28, Capaldo) reports, “Children born to mothers with atopic dermatitis are more prone to develop atopic dermatitis as well as other allergic illnesses, according to a study.” In the study, published in the Journal of the American Academy of Der…

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Older Infants With RSV Have Higher Likelihood Of Subsequent Respiratory Issues, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (11/28, Goldberg) reports, “Among young children who contract respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in the first 2 years of life, the risk for developing respiratory morbidity later in childhood is greater among children who contract RSV o…

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Study Finds School Shootings Often Related To Community Violence, Are Not Mass Killings

CNN (11/27, Muse) reports, “Many Americans think of school shootings as mass casualty events involving an adolescent with an assault-style weapon. But a…study says that most recent school shootings orchestrated by teenagers do not fit that image – and t…

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Study Suggests URTIs May Disproportionately Affect Pediatric Patients Who Identify As Black Or Mexican American

Infectious Disease Advisor (11/27, Barowski) reports, “Results of a study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases suggest that upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) may disproportionately affect pediatric patients who identify as Black or Mex…

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Study Finds Melatonin Use Becoming “Exceedingly Common” Among Adolescents

The Washington Post (11/27, Searing) reports, “Regular use of melatonin to help kids sleep has become ‘exceedingly common,’ with nearly 1 in 5 adolescents (19 percent) using it, according to research published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.” Additionally…

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Pediatric Patients Recovering From MIS-C Should Receive Cardiology Follow-Up, Study Suggests

Healio (11/27, Weldon) says, “Patients recovering from multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children should receive a cardiology follow-up, study findings reported in Pediatrics suggest.” In the study, out of 153 patients, “69 had one or more follow-ups….

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Study Data Indicate Transgender, Gender-Expansive Youth Report Worse QOL Mental Health Scores Compared To General US Population

Healio (11/27, Monostra) says, “Transgender and gender-expansive young people report worse quality of life mental health scores compared with the general U.S. population, according to study data.” In the study published in Transgender Health, over the pas…

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Around 20% Of Children Do Not Have Adequate Health Insurance Coverage, Study Finds

The Hill (11/27, Choi) reports, “A new retrospective study of children’s health care coverage found that roughly 1 in 5 children did not have adequate health insurance, meaning coverage that met their needs and was reasonably affordable.” The study, publi…

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China Says Surge In Respiratory Illnesses Due To Seasonal Flu, Other Known Pathogens Rather Than Novel Virus

The AP (11/26) reports, “A surge in respiratory illnesses across China that has drawn the attention of the World Health Organization is caused by the flu and other known pathogens and not by a novel virus, the country’s health ministry said Sunday.” Chine…

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Study Finds Overdose Deaths Have Soared Among Pregnant People Since 2018

The Washington Post (11/22, Malhi) said, “Drug overdose deaths among pregnant and postpartum people soared significantly between 2018 and 2021, according to a report published Wednesday.” National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) researchers “collected and…

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Researchers Create Growth Chart To Track Muscle Mass In Children

Pharmacy Times (11/22, Ferruggia) reported “researchers have developed a growth chart to track muscle mass in growing children, according to research.” The researchers made “an artificial intelligence (AI)-based tool that can track indicators of muscle ma…

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Pneumococcal Vaccines Do Not Help Prevent Otitis Media In Children, Study Suggests

Pharmacy Times (11/22, Gallagher) reported that “despite an enhanced mixed pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) schedule, there was still a high prevalence of otitis media among children in early childhood, according to results of a study.” The researcher…

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For Preterm Infants Born At 28 To 32 Weeks, Rate Of Severe Intraventricular Hemorrhage Or Death Does Not Differ With Umbilical Cord Milking Versus Delayed Cord Clamping, Study Suggests

HealthDay (11/22, Gotkine) reported that “for preterm infants born at 28 to 32 weeks, the rate of severe intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) or death does not differ with umbilical cord milking (UCM) versus delayed cord clamping (DCC), according to a study….

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FDA Reports More Cases Of Elevated Lead Levels In Children Who Consumed Recalled Apple Puree Pouches

The AP (11/22, Perrone) reported “more children were apparently sickened by apple puree pouches recently recalled due to dangerous lead contamination, the Food and Drug Administration said.” The FDA “has received 52 reports of elevated lead levels among c…

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Insufficient Childhood Vaccinations Leading To Deadly Outbreaks Among Children

The New York Times (11/25, Nolen) reported that large outbreaks “of diseases that primarily kill children are spreading around the world, a grim legacy of disruptions to health systems during the Covid-19 pandemic that have left more than 60 million child…

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Some States Experiencing Increases In COVID-19 Deaths Ahead Of Holidays

The Hill (11/21, Choi) reports, “Several states are experiencing increases in deaths related to COVID-19 as the holidays approach and this year’s respiratory viral season sets in.” CDC data show “eight states saw increases in coronavirus deaths based on d…

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Children With Crohn’s Disease Have Improved Outcomes At 1 Year When Receiving Treatment With Adalimumab Or Infliximab As Initial Anti-TNF Agents, Study Finds

Gastroenterology Advisor (11/21, Stong) reports, “Children with” Crohn’s disease “have improved outcomes at 1 year when receiving treatment with adalimumab or infliximab as initial anti-TNF agents, according to study results.” The findings were published…

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Pediatric Patients With Atopic Dermatitis At Greater Risk Of Developing Multiple Comorbid Conditions, Study Finds

Dermatology Advisor (11/21, Goldberg) reports, “Children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis (AD) face a significant clinical burden and have an increased risk of developing multiple comorbid conditions beyond their atopic disorders, according to study…

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Mental Healthcare Via Telehealth Can Eliminate Barriers To Care For Youth Enrolled In Medicaid, But Only If They Have Necessary Digital Resources, Study Finds

mHealth Intelligence (11/21, Vaidya) reports, “Mental healthcare provided via telehealth can eliminate geographic and other barriers to care for youth enrolled in Medicaid, but only if they have the digital resources necessary for virtual care, according…

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Teen Boys Who Reported Two Or More Concussions In Past Year Were More Likely To Report A Suicide Attempt, Study Finds

HealthDay (11/21, Miller) says that a study indicated that “teen boys who reported two or more concussions in the past year were two times more likely to report a suicide attempt than those who had one concussion.” Meanwhile, “girls’ odds for suicidal beh…

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During First Year Of Pandemic, Patient Visits, Medication Use For JIA Decreased Among Children With Commercial Insurance In The US, Study Finds

Rheumatology Advisor (11/21, Kuhns) reports, “During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic, patient visits for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) decreased by 10% to 12% among children with commercial insurance in the United States (US), with decreases…

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HHS Says US To Offer More Free COVID-19 Tests

Reuters (11/20, Aboulenein) reports, “The U.S. government on Monday will start taking orders for another round of free COVID-19 tests for delivery across the country, a Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) spokesperson said.” Those “households th…

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Prophylaxis With Apixaban Did Not Reduce Rate Of VTE In Children With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Or Lymphoma, Study Finds

MedPage Today (11/20, Bassett) reports, “Prophylaxis with apixaban (Eliquis) failed to reduce the rate of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in children with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma, according to results from the phase III rando…

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Pediatric Asthma ED Visits Are Higher Among Young Children With Asthma Who Live In Areas With Lower Economic, Educational Opportunities, Research Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (11/20, Stong) reports, “Pediatric asthma emergency department (ED) visits are higher among young children with asthma who live in areas with lower opportunities, including social/economic and educational neighborhood opportunities, re…

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Supplemental DHA For Preterm Infants Did Not Improve Behavioral Functioning At Five Years Of Age, Study Finds

MedPage Today (11/20, Henderson) reports, “Administration of supplemental docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to infants born at less than 29 weeks’ gestation did not improve behavioral functioning at 5 years of age, a follow-up to a randomized trial showed.” Publ…

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Children Of Parents With Infertility Had Slightly Higher Autism Spectrum Disorder Risk, Study Finds

MedPage Today (11/20, Monaco) reports, “Children of parents with infertility had a slightly higher rate of autism spectrum disorder, a population-based cohort study of over 1.3 million children found.” Investigators found that “compared with children born…

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Reminders To Parents Increased HPV Vaccine Uptake In Tweens, Trial Finds

MedPage Today (11/20, Robertson) reports, “Reminding parents of tweens who were due for a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine increased uptake, especially when combined with auditing healthcare professionals after appointments, a cluster randomized trial s…

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Senate Democrats Press AstraZeneca, Sanofi For Answers Regarding RSV Drug Shortage

The Hill (11/17, Weixel) reported, “A group of Senate Democrats are demanding answers about a shortage of a new drug that prevents respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in infants.” The senators sent a letter Friday in which they “asked manufacturers AstraZen…

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Likelihood Of CGM Use Is Lower For Children With T1D Living In Rural Vs Urban Areas, Study Finds

Healio (11/16, Monostra) reported, “Children with type 1 diabetes living in small or isolated rural towns are less likely to use continuous glucose monitoring than those living in urban areas, according to” a study. The findings were published in Diabetes…

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Diabetes In Pregnancy Linked To Higher Risk Of Common Neonatal Comorbidities In Babies Born Moderately Or Late-Preterm, Study Finds

Healio (11/17, Weldon) reported, “Diabetes in pregnancy is associated with a higher likelihood of common neonatal comorbidities in babies born moderately or late-preterm, such as a need for respiratory support, according to a study published in Pediatrics…

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FDA Screening Cinnamon Imports For Toxic Lead Contamination

The AP (11/17, Aleccia) reported, “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is screening imports of cinnamon from multiple countries for toxic lead contamination after growing reports of children who were sickened after eating pouches of applesauce and apple…

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Pregnant Woman’s Mental Health May Affect Mind Of Unborn Child, Research Indicates

HealthDay (11/17, Thompson) reported, “A pregnant woman’s mental health might have profound effects on the mind of her unborn child, a new evidence review warns.” Specifically, “children were more likely to have ADHD symptoms or exhibit aggressive or host…

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Flu, RSV Cases On The Rise Across The US, Officials Say

The AP (11/17, Stobbe) reported, “The U.S. flu season is underway, with at least seven states reporting high levels of illnesses and cases rising in other parts of the country, health officials say.” On Friday, the CDC “posted new flu data…showing very…

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Global Measles Cases Rose 18%, Deaths Up 40% Between 2021 And 2022, WHO, CDC Say

The New York Times (11/16, Blum) says, “Measles cases worldwide rose 18 percent and deaths increased by more than 40 percent from 2021 to 2022 as countries struggled to get routine vaccinations back on track after the pandemic, according to a…report fro…

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US Premature Birth Rate Was 10.4% In 2022, Nonprofit Says

CNN (11/16, Howard) reports, “The rate of premature birth in the United States remains high, especially in the southern region of the country, according to the infant and maternal health nonprofit March of Dimes.” In its annual report card (PDF) released…

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US Officials Release Additional Doses Of Nirsevimab

The AP (11/16, Stobbe, Hunter) reports, “RSV infections are rising sharply in some parts of the country, nearly filling hospital emergency departments in Georgia, Texas and some other states.” In response, “federal officials on Thursday announced they wer…

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Consumer Advocacy Groups Warn About Surveillance By Smart Toys

ABC News (11/16, Yu) says, “A new report from the U.S. Public Interest Research Group Education Fund, a national network of consumer advocacy groups, is raising the alarm about a potential rising threat posed by smart toys for children ahead of the holida…

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Survey Responses Identify 12 Research Priorities That Could Help Address Systemic Disparities In Pediatric Emergency Care

Healio (11/16, Weldon) reports, “Survey responses from a panel of experts identified 12 research priorities that could help address systemic disparities in pediatric emergency care, according to results published in JAMA Network Open.” With the survey, “t…

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Physicians, FDA Spar Over Giving Probiotics To Infants

The Wall Street Journal (11/16, Whyte, Subscription Publication) reports some physicians are criticizing the FDA’s recent warning against giving probiotics to preterm infants, saying the drugs can save lives. Other physicians support the agency’s move, ar…

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CDC Report: Strides In Treating Childhood Cancer Have Stalled For Black, Hispanic Youth

The AP (11/16, Johnson) reports “advances in childhood cancer are a success story in modern medicine.” However, “in the past decade, those strides have stalled for Black and Hispanic youth, opening a gap in death rates, according to a new report” from the…

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WHO Launches New Commission On Social Connection To Focus On Addressing Loneliness Epidemic

CNN (11/15, Christensen) reports, “The World Health Organization is making loneliness a global health priority, it said Wednesday, launching a new Commission on Social Connection.” Over “the next three years, the commission will focus on ways to address t…

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Mean HbA1c For Children And Adults With T1D Improved From 2016 To 2022, Data Indicate

Healio (11/15, Monostra) reports, “Mean HbA1c for children and adults with type 1 diabetes improved by 0.3 percentage points from 2016 to 2022, according to data from 15 clinics participating in the T1D Exchange Quality Improvement Collaborative.” The res…

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Preemies Whose Umbilical Cords Are Clamped Up To Two Minutes After Birth Are Less Likely To Die Before Leaving Hospital, Evidence Indicates

HealthDay (11/15, Thompson) reports, “The timing of a simple, standard part of childbirth could mean the difference between life and death for premature babies, a pair of…evidence reviews have concluded.” In a study published in The Lancet, “preemies wh…

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Air Pollution May Alter Early Infant Development, Study Finds

HealthDay (11/15, Thompson, Miller) reports, “Air pollution could be harming the development of children, reaching into the womb to alter their healthy growth, a…study reports.” In the study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, “researchers…

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Combination Products Containing Probiotics Combined With Prebiotics Or Lactoferrin Were Linked To Reduction In Morbidity, Mortality In Preterm Infants, Study Finds

Gastroenterology Advisor (11/15) reports, “Combination products containing probiotics combined with prebiotics or lactoferrin were associated with a reduction in morbidity and mortality in preterm infants, according to study results.” The findings were pu…

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Study Finds Neighborhood Disadvantages Do Not Influence Minority Children’s High Rate Of ASD

HCP Live (11/15, Derman) reports, “Children of mothers from minority groups in a population with health insurance are associated with having a higher likelihood of receiving an autism spectrum diagnosis (ASD). Yet only children of White mothers had ASD di…

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Around 36M Adults, 3.5M Children In US Have Received Updated COVID-19 Vaccine, CDC Says

ABC News (11/14, Benadjaoud, Kekatos) reports, “An estimated 36 million adults in the United States have received the updated COVID-19 vaccine as of Monday, according to…data from the federal government.” Additionally, around “3.5 million children have…

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Report Outlines Health Risks Of Climate Change, Particularly Heat-Related Deaths

The New York Times (11/14, Erdenesanaa) says, “Climate change continues to have a worsening effect on health and mortality around the world, according to an exhaustive report published on Tuesday by an international team of 114 researchers.” Published in…

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Childhood Obesity May Increase Risk For Infertility Later In Life, Study Finds

Endocrinology Advisor (11/14, Nye) reports, “Childhood obesity may increase risk for infertility later in life, according to study findings published in BMC Endocrine Disorders.” In the systemic review, one study found “a 5.9% reduction in odds of first b…

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Serum Bile Acid Independently Predicts Native Liver Survival Among Pediatric Patients With Alagille Syndrome And Neonatal Cholestasis, Analysis Finds

HCP Live (11/14, Kunzmann) reports, “Serum bile acid is an independent predictive risk factor for native liver survival among pediatric patients with Alagille syndrome and neonatal cholestasis, according to a new analysis.” Researchers “observed a positiv…

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Video Game Intervention May Improve HIV Testing, Counseling Rates Among Adolescents With HIV Infection, Study Finds

Infectious Disease Advisor (11/14, Wei) reports, “A novel video game intervention may help improve HIV testing and counseling rates among adolescents with HIV infection, according to study results published in the Journal of Adolescent Health.” The study…

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North Dakota Judge Denies Request To Temporarily Block State’s Ban On Gender-Affirming Care For Minors

The AP (11/14, Dura) reports, “A North Dakota judge has ruled that he won’t immediately block the state’s ban on gender-affirming health care for minors, delivering an early setback to families who want the new law found unconstitutional.” That law makes…

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Majority Of Children With Flu Did Not Receive Antiviral Treatment, Study Finds

HealthDay (11/14, Thompson, Miller) reports, “Children stricken with influenza aren’t receiving the flu-busting antiviral drug Tamiflu [oseltamivir] even though it’s recommended for them, a…study says.” For the study, published in Pediatrics, “researche…

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Deaths Due To Cardiac Arrest In College Athletes Have Been Declining Over Last 20 Years, Research Finds

NBC News (11/13, Carroll) reports that researchers have found that “deaths due to cardiac arrest in college athletes have been steadily declining over the last 20 years.” The findings were presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2023. The “analysis of da…

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Nearly 49M People In US Over Age 12 Had Substance Use Disorder In 2022, HHS Data Indicate

CNN (11/13, McPhillips) reports, “Nearly 49 million people in the US ages 12 and older – more than 1 in 6 – had a substance use disorder in 2022, according to survey data released Monday by the US Department of Health and Human Services.” Broken down, “ab…

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Peanut-Allergic Toddlers Who Stayed On Epicutaneous Immunotherapy Skin Patch Reached Higher Levels Of Peanut Tolerance During The Second Year, Trial Finds

MedPage Today (11/13, Dotinga) reports, “Peanut-allergic toddlers who stayed on an investigational, epicutaneous immunotherapy skin patch reached higher levels of peanut tolerance during the second year, according to the open-label extension of the EPITOP…

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Physicians Warned To Be On Lookout For Cases Of Lead Poisoning Tied To Tainted Applesauce

The AP (11/13, Aleccia) reports, “U.S. health officials are warning doctors to be on the lookout for possible cases of lead poisoning in children after at least 22 toddlers in 14 states were sickened by lead linked to tainted pouches of cinnamon apple pur…

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Lawmaker To Introduce Bill Banning Children’s Toy Some Say Poses Significant Health Risks

CNN (11/13, Rothenberg) reports, “Government officials, public health professionals and concerned parents are calling on Congress to ban water beads, a children’s toy that they say poses significant health risks.” Rep. Frank Pallone (D-NJ) on Monday “anno…

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Survey Finds Melatonin Use Common Among Children

MedPage Today (11/13, Henderson) says, “Melatonin use among children ages 1 to 13 years was common, an online survey of parents showed. The prevalence of melatonin consumption in the past 30 days was 5.6% in preschoolers, 18.5% in school-age kids ages 5 t…

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RSV Incidence Rates Among Pregnant People, Though Lower Than Those Seen In Older Adults And Young Children, Are Still Significant, Researchers Say

Healio (11/10, Stulpin) reported, “Respiratory syncytial virus incidence rates among pregnant people are lower than those seen in older adults and young children, although researchers say rates are still significant and warrant consideration in vaccine po…

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AstraZeneca Prioritizing US Market For RSV Drug Amid Increase In Cases

Reuters (11/10, Wingrove, Fick) reported, “AstraZeneca on Friday said it was prioritizing the U.S. market for additional doses of its respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) drug Beyfortus, which was approved in July to prevent the disease in infants and toddle…

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Omaha Officials Launch TB Testing Drive After Hundreds Of Children Exposed At Daycare Program

The Washington Post (11/11, McDaniel) reported, “tuberculosis testing for hundreds of children in Omaha began Saturday, after a large group of infants, toddlers and children was potentially exposed to infection through a drop-in day-care program.” Over “5…

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CT Scans Linked To Increased Risk Of Blood Cancer In Young People, Study Finds

HealthDay (11/10, Thompson) reported, “CT scans are significantly linked to an increased risk of blood cancers in young people, a major multinational study has found.” The study, published in Nature Medicine, found that “accumulated radiation doses to the…

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Secondhand Smoking Is Independent Risk Factor In Pediatric Bronchial Asthma Hospitalizations In Young Children, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (11/10, Stong) reported, “Secondhand smoking…is an independent risk factor in pediatric bronchial asthma hospitalizations in young children, especially among those who had respiratory syncytial virus…infection during infancy, accor…

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Food Insecurity, Low Household Income Increase Risk Of NAFLD In Adolescents, Study Finds

HCP Live (11/12, Brooks) reports, “Food insecurity and low household income increase the risk of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD)…in adolescents, according to” study findings. Researchers found that “food-insecure adolescents living in lower-inc…

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Immunoglobulin Use In Pediatric Patients With RSV-Associated Lower Respiratory Tract Infections Has Little To No Effect On Hospitalization Length, Adverse Event Risk, Study Finds

Infectious Disease Advisor (11/9, Wei) reports, “The use of immunoglobulins in pediatric patients with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) has little to no effect on hospitalization length and adverse ev…

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Researchers Identify 16 Predictors Of Infant Hospitalization For RSV, Develop Model For Clinicians To Predict Risk

Healio (11/9, Weldon) reports, “Researchers identified 16 predictors of infant hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus and developed a model that clinicians can use to predict an infant’s risk, according to findings published in The Lancet Digital…

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At Least Two Million Children Have Lost Medicaid Insurance This Year

The New York Times (11/9, Weiland) reports that “at least two million low-income children have lost health insurance since the end of a federal policy that guaranteed coverage through Medicaid earlier in the Covid-19 pandemic, according to…analyses by r…

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Umbilical Cord Milking Appears To Be Safe Alternative To Delayed Cord Clamping In Very Premature Infants, Trial Finds

MedPage Today (11/9, Henderson) reports, “Umbilical cord milking (UCM) appeared to be a safe alternative to delayed cord clamping in very premature infants, those born at 28 to 32 weeks’ gestation, according to a randomized controlled trial.” In the study…

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Percentage Of US Kindergarteners Receiving Vaccine Exemptions Reaches Record High, CDC Says

CNN (11/9, Musa) reports, “The percentage of kindergartners who received their state-required vaccines for measles remained below the federal target last school year, and the rate of vaccine exemptions for children reached the highest level ever reported…

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CDC Director Cohen Urges Vaccinations Before Holidays

CBS News (11/8, George, Moniuszko) reports, “In an interview with CBS News, Dr. Mandy Cohen, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said this is the best window to get vaccinated to protect yourself and your family for the holiday.” C…

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Around 70% Of US Counties Have Insufficient Maternal Mental Healthcare Access, Assessment Finds

PatientEngagementHIT (11/8, Heath) reports, “Seven in 10 counties in the United States have insufficient maternal mental healthcare access, a problem that exacerbates maternal health outcomes, according to a new assessment from the Policy Center for Mater…

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Perinatal/Early-Life Factors May Be Associated With Control Of Asthma In Preschoolers, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (11/8, Goldberg) reports, “Partly controlled or uncontrolled asthma in preschoolers may be linked with children’s early-life exposures and maternal perinatal factors, as well as to environmental factors, according to study findings.” T…

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Study Looks Into Impact Of Periconceptional Maternal Diets On Wheeze Trajectories For Children

HCP Live (11/8, Smith) reports a study was conducted “to look into wheeze trajectories for children and to assess links with the quality of periconceptional maternal diets.” In the study published in Allergy, “overall, the research team pointed out 4 uniq…

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Seventeen Major Food Manufacturers Earned F Grade For Lack Of Progress In Reducing Pesticides In Products

CNN (11/8, LaMotte) reports, “Seventeen major food manufacturers earned an average grade of F for their lack of progress in reducing pesticides in the products they sell, according to a new analysis by As You Sow, a nonprofit specializing in shareholder a…

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Consumer Product Safety Commission Proposes Major Redesign Of Baby Loungers After Infant Deaths

NBC News (11/8, Khimm, Chuck) reports, “Staff at the Consumer Product Safety Commission have proposed a major redesign of most baby loungers and similar infant cushions, citing 79 deaths from 2010 to 2022 – most of which occurred after babies were placed…

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Many New Mothers Struggle To Access Good Healthcare, Report Finds

HealthDay (11/7, Foster) reports, “Many new moms, particularly those on Medicaid, struggle to get health care and social support in the year following their baby’s birth…research reveals.” For the study, published in Health Affairs, researchers looked a…

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FDA Reports Accord Healthcare Has Resumed Manufacturing Methotrexate

Reuters (11/7, Jain) says, “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported on Tuesday Accord Healthcare has resumed manufacturing of methotrexate, one of the most commonly used cancer drugs, amid ongoing shortages for some cancer drugs in the United…

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Dietary Guidelines Committee Examining Science Behind Ultra-Processed Foods

The Washington Post (11/7, O’Connor) reports, “For decades, the federal government’s dietary guidelines have urged people to eat plenty of foods rich in vitamins, minerals, fiber, and protein – while warning us to steer clear of foods high in sodium, suga…

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Qualitative Studies Of Patients With Juvenile Localized Scleroderma Demonstrate Psychosocial Impact Of Condition That Quantitative Studies Do Not Reveal, Review Finds

Rheumatology Advisor (11/7, Khaja) reports, “A review of quantitative studies including patients with juvenile localized scleroderma (JLS) did not reveal any statistically significant disease-related impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQOL) m…

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CDC Warns That Cases Of Congenital Syphilis Are Skyrocketing, Recommends More Testing And Earlier Treatment

The New York Times (11/7, Mandavilli) says, “The rise in sexually transmitted infections in the United States has taken a particularly tragic turn: More than 3,700 cases of congenital syphilis were reported in 2022, roughly 11 times the number recorded a…

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CDC To Expand Surveillance Of Traveler Samples To Include Other Pathogens Including Flu, RSV

Reuters (11/6, Satija) reports, “The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said on Monday it was expanding testing of samples collected from international air travelers beyond COVID-19, to include flu and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)…

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COVID-19 Vaccination Efforts Still Facing Problems

The New York Times (11/6, Sheikh) reports, “The recently authorized Covid vaccines promised to protect the public against an expected uptick of respiratory illness this winter. But getting shots into arms is still proving challenging.” In particular, chil…

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More Than 10M Low-Income Americans Have Been Disenrolled From Medicaid Following End Of Pandemic

Healthcare Dive (11/6, Pifer) reports, “More than 10 million low-income Americans have lost Medicaid coverage as states continue checking eligibility for the safety-net program following the pandemic.” As of November 1, a KFF tracker found “35% of the 28…

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Childhood Trauma Linked To 48% Higher Chance Of Serious, Recurrent Headaches As Adults, Analysis Finds

The Washington Post (11/6, Searing) reports, “People who experienced trauma as a child or adolescent were found to be 48 percent more likely to have serious and recurrent headaches as an adult than were those who had not experienced trauma in their early…

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Analysis Finds That Following Firearm Injuries Among Children, Family Members Experience Sharp Increase In Psychiatric Disorders

The New York Times (11/6, Barry) reports, “With each mass shooting, Americans look to one grim indicator – the number of dead – as a measure of the destructive impact.” However, “damage left behind by gunshot wounds reverberates among survivors and famili…

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CDC Unlikely To Change Five-Day Isolation Recommendation Following Positive COVID-19 Test

NBC News (11/4, Edwards, Syal, Miller) reported, “Covid symptoms may change, but the appearance of a pink line on a rapid test means one thing for sure: five days of isolation.” That CDC guidance “has been in place since late 2021. At the moment, the agen…

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Number Of Adolescents With HIV PrEP Prescription Increased Over 75% Since Becoming Available To Them In 2018, Study Finds

Healio (11/3, Weldon) reported, “The number of adolescents with a prescription for HIV prevention medication increased by more than 75% during the first 3-plus years the medicine was available to them, according study findings published in Pediatrics.” In…

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Pediatric Emergency Department Visits For Firearm Injuries Increased During Pandemic, Study Finds

CNN (11/6, McPhillips) reports, “Pediatric emergency department visits for firearm injuries became twice as common during the Covid-19 pandemic, according to research.” Investigators found that “from 2017 to early 2020, there were about 18 firearm-related…

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Patient Navigators Safe, Potentially Useful For Certain Children With CKD, Researchers Say

Healio (11/3, Houck) reported, “The efficacy of patient navigators may not improve the self-rated health of children with chronic kidney disease; however, caregivers gain skills from the program, according to research presented at” Kidney Week 2023. Resea…

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Two Studies Investigate Disadvantages For Children With Hearing Loss

Healio (11/3, Weldon) reported, “Children who are deaf or hard of hearing have worse quality of life, and COVID-19 lockdowns had disrupted their exposure to speech during important periods of development, according to a pair of studies published in JAMA N…

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Nirmatrelvir-Ritonavir Reduces Risk Of Hospitalization, Death In Patients With COVID-19 Who Have Moderate-To-Severe CKD, Real-World Data Suggest

Renal & Urology News (11/2, Persaud) reports, “Nirmatrelvir/ritonavir (Paxlovid) reduces the risks for hospitalization and death in patients with COVID-19 who have moderate to severe chronic kidney disease (CKD), real-world data suggest. Investigators pre…

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Maternal Depressive Symptom Trajectories Remained Stable Throughout Pregnancy And Two Years Postpartum, Researchers Say

Healio (11/1, Welsh) reports, “Maternal depressive symptom trajectories remained stable throughout pregnancy and up to 2 years after childbirth, which suggests focusing not only on postpartum depression but depression throughout pregnancy, researchers rep…

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COVID-19 Infection Was Less Severe, Less Frequent Than Other Respiratory Infections In Young Infants During The Pandemic, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (11/2, Goldberg) reports, “COVID-19 infection was less severe and less frequent than other respiratory infections in infants less than 2 months old during the pandemic, according to study findings.” The research was published in Pediat…

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Last Season’s Bronchiolitis Hospitalizations Among Children Were Higher Than Pre-Pandemic Rates, Study Finds

Healio (11/2, Hornick) reports, “Compared with the median bronchiolitis admission rate before the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitalizations among children increased during the 2022 to 2023 season, according to” a study. The findings were published in JAMA Netwo…

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Survey Shows Declines In Number Of High School Students Who Report Vaping

The New York Times (11/2, Jewett) reports, “The number of high school students who reported using e-cigarettes fell to 10 percent in the spring of this year from 14 percent last year, according to the results of an annual survey released on Thursday by fe…

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Race Plays A Role In Anxiety, Depression Among Minority College Students, Study Finds

USA Today (11/1, Martin) reports a “study shows that race may play a role in depression among college students who are minorities at both predominantly white institutions and historically Black universities.” Researchers “found that moderately severe and…

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Half Of Children Under 2 With Acute Bronchiolitis Had Follow-Up Interaction Within A Week Of ED Discharge, Study Finds

HCP Live (11/1, Smith) reports that approximately “half of commercially insured children aged less than 2 years with acute bronchiolitis had a follow-up interaction within a week of emergency department (ED) discharge, according to new findings, and their…

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Plaintiffs Urge US Supreme Court To Block Tennessee’s Youth Transgender Care Ban

The Washington Post (11/1, Parks) reports “transgender young people, their families and” healthcare professionals “on Wednesday asked the Supreme Court to block a Tennessee law that bans gender transition care for people younger than 18.” If the Supreme C…

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Children With Down Syndrome Are At Increased Risk For ALL, Research Finds

HealthDay (11/1, Murez) reports that research finds children with Down syndrome “are at increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and have higher rates of relapse and treatment-related harm.” The data indicated that “the five-year survival for…

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Researchers Say Many Antibiotics Used To Treat Common Childhood Infections Are No Longer Effective Due To Antibiotic Resistance

HealthDay (11/1, Murez) reports, “Many antibiotics long used to treat common childhood infections are no longer effective because of antibiotic resistance.” In a study published in The Lancet Regional Health – Southeast Asia, researchers “say global guide…

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FDA Experts Discuss Ways To Make “Candy-Like” Medications Less Appealing To Children

NBC News (10/31, Lovelace) reports, “Since 2019, there’s been a spike in the number of children younger than 4 who were taken to the emergency room for ingesting gummy multivitamins and over-the-counter sleep aids like melatonin.” On Monday, an FDA panel…

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Hospitals Prepare For Influx Of RSV Infections Among Children Amid Shortage Of RSV Antibody

The Hill (10/31, Weixel) reports, “A supply shortage means a drug that can prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in infants won’t have a major immediate impact, children’s hospitals said, and they are preparing for a surge in admissions this respirato…

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CDC Releases New Recommendations For HCV Screening Among Perinatally Exposed Infants And Children

MedPage Today (10/31, Robertson) reports, “The CDC released new recommendations for hepatitis C virus (HCV) screening among perinatally exposed infants and children.” The recommendations are: “all perinatally exposed infants should be screened for HCV wit…

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Children With ASD Had Worse Sleep, Lower Levels Of Physical Activity Than Peers, Study Finds

Healio (10/31, Weldon) reports, “Children with autism spectrum disorders had worse sleep and lower levels of physical activity than their peers, a study published in JAMA Network Open found.” In the study, researchers found that “compared with peers witho…

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Biden Administration Calls For All US Schools To Stock Naloxone To Counteract Opioid Overdoses

The Hill (10/31, Fortinsky) reports, “The Biden administration on Monday called for all U.S. schools to stock naloxone and to train students and faculty to be able to administer the medication in the event of an opioid overdose on their grounds.” In a let…

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US Infant Mortality Rate Rose 3% Last Year, CDC Says

The AP (11/1, Stobbe) reports, “The U.S. infant mortality rate rose 3% last year – the largest increase in two decades, according to” a CDC report. The data indicated that “white and Native American infants, infant boys and babies born at 37 weeks or earl…

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Report Finds A Quarter Of Aspiring Physicians Are Considering Quitting Medical School

The Hill (10/30, Choi) says a “report on how medical students view the future of their careers has found that a quarter of aspiring physicians in the U.S. say they are considering quitting their studies, with many expressing concerns about their mental he…

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Study Finds Link Between Preschool Program Participation And Reduced Risk Of CV Disease In Midlife

Healio (10/30, Weldon) reports, “A study linked participation in preschool programs to cardiovascular health in midlife, according to findings published in JAMA Pediatrics.” Researchers used the American Heart Association’s (AHA’s) Ideal Cardiovascular He…

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Metformin Use May Be Linked To Improved Exacerbation Rates In Adolescents, Young Adults With Asthma, Study Indicates

Pulmonology Advisor (10/30, Stong) reports, “Metformin use may be associated with improved exacerbation rates in adolescents and young adults with asthma, according to” a study. The findings were published in Pediatric Pulmonology.

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Neonatal Midazolam Exposure Is Linked To Long-Term Impairment Of Hippocampal Growth, Especially Among Boys, Study Finds

Neurology Advisor (10/30, Arini Lopez) reports, “Neonatal midazolam exposure is associated with long-term impairment of hippocampal growth, especially among boys, according to study findings.” The research was published in Neurology.

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Antibiotic And Acid Suppressant Exposure During Perinatal Period Was Linked To Development Of EoE Later In Life, Study Finds

MedPage Today (10/30, Short) reports, “Antibiotic and acid suppressant exposure during the perinatal period was linked to the development of eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) later in life, a Danish cohort study found.” Investigators found that “infants with…

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Traumatic Events During Childhood Are Associated With Higher Likelihood Of Headache Disorders As An Adult, Study Indicates

USA Today (10/30, Rodriguez) reports that researchers have “found that people who experienced one or more traumatic events during childhood were 48% more likely to develop headache disorders as an adult.” Researchers found that “the body holds trauma that…

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Federal Government Proposes Rule To Establish Disincentives For Healthcare Professionals Interfering In Access, Exchange, Or Use Of Electronic Health Information

HealthLeaders Media (10/30, Wicklund) reports, “The Health and Human Services Department has released a proposed rule that would establish three specific ‘disincentives’ for healthcare [professionals] found by the HHS Office of the Inspector General (OIG)…

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Survey Finds More Than 22% Of US Parents Concerned Their Teens Are Dependent On The Internet

HealthDay (10/30, Murez) reports, “American parents fear their teens’ internet use could expose them to cyberbullying, harmful content and set them up for addiction, a…study shows.” In a survey published in JAMA Network Open, “more than 22% were concern…

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Survey Finds Low Uptake Of New COVID-19 Vaccines

The New York Times (10/27, Mandavilli) reported, “Few Americans have opted to be immunized against the coronavirus so far this fall: Just over 7 percent of adults and 2 percent of children had received a Covid-19 vaccine as of Oct. 14, according to a surv…

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FDA Approves 40 mg/mL Oral Suspension Of Vamorolone To Treat Patients With DMD

Healio (10/27) reported, “The FDA has approved a 40 mg/mL oral suspension of Agamree” (vamorolone) “to treat Duchenne muscular dystrophy in patients aged 2 years and older, according to a release from the manufacturer.” This “approval was based on data fr…

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Timing Of Corticosteroid Exposure During Pregnancy Was Not Associated With Delays In Neurodevelopmental Milestones During First 3 Years Of Life, Study Finds

Healio (10/27, Gawel) reported, “The timing of corticosteroid exposure during pregnancy was not associated with any delays in neurodevelopmental milestones during the first 3 years of life, according to a study.” However, “there was an association between…

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Treatment Rates For Depression, Anxiety, ADHD Among Children And Adolescents Are Low, International Study Finds

HCP Live (10/27, Derman) reported, “Treatment rates for depression, anxiety, ADHD, and behavior disorders among children and adolescents are low—and rates differ by age, income level, and region, according to a new international study.” Investigators came…

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EPA To Bolster Regulations To Lower Lead In Drinking Water

The AP (10/28, Phillis, Stobbe) reported, “Decades after officials banned lead in gasoline for new cars and stopped the sale of lead paint – huge steps toward eliminating significant sources of lead exposure to the public – there are still an estimated 50…

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Pediatric Bronchiolitis Hospitalizations Took A Downturn During Pandemic Before Consistently Rising Thereafter, With Seasonal Patterns Still Not Normal, Study Finds

MedPage Today (10/27, Short) reported, “Pediatric bronchiolitis hospitalizations took a brief downturn during the pandemic before consistently rising thereafter, with seasonal patterns yet to return to normal, a nationwide study found.” Investigators foun…

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HHS, CISA Release Healthcare Cybersecurity Toolkit

Healthcare IT News (10/26, Fox) reports, “The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and the Department of Health and Human Services released the Cybersecurity Toolkit for Healthcare and Public Health after a discussion on cybersecurity challeng…

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Survey Finds High Costs A Barrier To Healthcare For Many, Regardless Of Insurance Status

PatientEngagementHIT (10/26, Heath) says, “Having health insurance coverage isn’t enough to attenuate high healthcare costs and their impacts on patient access to care, according to a…Commonwealth Fund report.” Between 43 and 57 percent of respondents “…

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Treatment With Higher-Exposure Dupilumab Led To Sustained Improvements In Reduction Of Peak Esophageal Intraepithelial Eosinophil Counts Among Children With EoE, Study Finds

MedPage Today (10/26, Susman) reports, “Treatment with higher-exposure dupilumab (Dupixent) led to sustained improvements in the reduction of peak esophageal intraepithelial eosinophil counts among children ages 1 to 11 with eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE)…

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Abbott Will Stop Sales Of Similac Probiotic Product Following FDA Warning

Reuters (10/26, Leo, Mandowara) reports, “Abbott Laboratories will stop sales of its Similac Probiotic Tri-Blend product used for hospitalized preterm infants after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a warning letter, the health regulator said o…

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CDC Recommends New Meningococcal Disease Vaccine For Teens, Young Adults That Covers All Five Serotypes

USA Today (10/26, Rodriguez) reports the CDC advisory panel on Wednesday recommended a new vaccine to protect teens against meningococcal disease, which “can cause hearing loss, severe neurological damage, the loss of limbs, and, in many cases, death.” Pr…

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Biden Administration Requests $1.55B From Congress To Address Fentanyl Crisis

NBC News (10/25, Guilfoil) reports, “The White House on Wednesday requested $1.55 billion from Congress to address illicit fentanyl driving overdose deaths across the country as part of a broader funding package.” This money “would be included alongside m…

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Teplizumab Helps To Preserve Beta-Cell Function For Children With New-Onset T1D, Study Finds

Healio (10/25, Monostra) reports, “Children with new-onset type 1 diabetes had better preservation of beta-cell function with two 12-day courses of teplizumab compared with those receiving placebo, according to” a study. The findings were published in The…

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Children Born To Adolescent, Young Adult Women With Cancer History At Higher Risk Of Birth Defects, Study Finds

Healio (10/25, Southall) reports, “The offspring of adolescent and young adult women with a history of cancer experienced a higher risk for birth defects, according to study results published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.” The study “re…

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Child Care Centers Are An Unlikely Source For Spreading COVID-19, Study Finds

The Hill (10/25, Nazzaro) reports, “A new study found child care centers are an unlikely source for spreading COVID-19, leading researchers to suggest the current testing and isolation recommendations can be revised to align with those for other serious r…

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Babies Exposed To Common Chemicals While In The Womb May Be At Higher Risk Of Gaining Weight Rapidly During Early Childhood, Study Suggests

NBC News (10/25, Mogg) reports, “Babies exposed to a set of common chemicals while in the womb may be at higher risk of gaining weight rapidly during early childhood, a recent study suggests.” The study, “published last week in the journal Environmental H…

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Young Adults In US Experience Anxiety, Depression Twice As Frequently As Teenagers, Survey Indicates

The Washington Post (10/24, Reynolds Lewis) reports, “Young adults in the United States experience anxiety and depression twice as frequently as teenagers, according to a new nationally representative survey.” The survey, from “Making Caring Common, a pro…

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Children Of Fathers With Postpartum Depression More Likely To Experience At Least One Adverse Childhood Experience At Age 5, Data Indicate

MedPage Today (10/24, Firth) reports, “Children of fathers with postpartum depression were significantly more likely to experience at least one adverse childhood experience (ACE) at age 5, according to data from the Future of Families and Child Wellbeing…

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Meta Sued By Multiple US States Alleging Social Media Platforms Harmful To Children’s Health

The New York Times (10/24, Kang, Singer) reports, “Meta was sued by more than three dozen states on Tuesday for knowingly using features on Instagram and Facebook to hook children to its platforms, even as the company said its social media sites were safe…

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Suicidal Ideation Common Among Transgender And Gender Diverse Youth In ED, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (10/24, Henderson) reports, “A keyword-based search in the electronic medical record (EMR) at an urban emergency department (ED) showed high rates of suicidal ideation among transgender and gender diverse (TGD) youth, according to a retrospe…

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For RSV Antibody In Short Supply, CDC Advises Physicians To Prioritize Babies At Highest Risk Of Disease

The AP (10/24, Stobbe) reports, “A new shot for infants against RSV is in short supply, and U.S. health officials told doctors they should prioritize giving the drug to babies at the highest risk of severe disease.” This includes “infants less than 6 mont…

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Many College Kids Are Depressed And Anxious, Particularly When They Are A Minority On Campus Or First In Family To Go To A University, Study Finds

HealthDay (10/23, Reinberg) reports, “Many college kids are depressed and anxious, especially when they are a minority on campus or the first in their family to go to a university, a…study finds.” Investigators also found that “women suffered greater de…

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Study Suggests 14% Of Adults And 12% Of Children Addicted To Ultra-Processed Foods

USA Today (10/23, Al-Arshani) reports, “An analysis of 281 studies in 36 countries…found that your inability to put down the ice cream, chips and candy may have less to do with your self-control and more to do with the addictive quality of ultra-process…

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Experts Stress Importance Of Vaccination As Respiratory Virus Season Approaches

CNN (10/23, McPhillips) reports, “The first signs of respiratory virus season are just starting to show in the United States, but experts stress the importance of getting vaccinated now to stay healthy through the winter and reduce strain on the health ca…

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RSV Antibody In Short Supply, CDC Says

The Hill (10/23, Choi) reports, “The monoclonal antibody for preventing the respiratory syncytial virus, known as RSV, in infants is in short supply, and federal officials are advising doses be prioritized for those at the highest risk for severe illness,…

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Online Distributors Often Sell Delta-8 Cannabinoid Products With Colorful Packaging, Do Not Check Age, Research Finds

MedPage Today (10/23, Firth) reports, “More than half of all delta-8 cannabinoid (D8) online distributors sold products in kid-friendly packaging and many did not ask customers their age, according to preliminary research presented at the” 2023 AAP Nation…

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Some 220K Youths In US Have Been Diagnosed With Arthritis, Report Says

The Washington Post (10/23, Searing) reports, “Some 220,000 youths in the United States — children and adolescents younger than 18 — have been diagnosed with arthritis, a disease most commonly associated with older people, according to a report from the”…

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Maternal mRNA COVID-19 Vaccination During Pregnancy Linked To Lower Risk Of Neonatal Death, Other Poor Outcomes, Study Finds

MedPage Today (10/23, Sullivan) reports, “Maternal mRNA COVID-19 vaccination during pregnancy was associated with lower risks of poor neonatal outcomes, including neonatal death, according to a population-based retrospective cohort study from Canada.” Add…

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Specialization In A Single Sport At A Young Age Can Lead To Lasting Negative Health Outcomes For Children, Experts Say

MedPage Today (10/20, DePeau-Wilson) reported, “Specialization in a single sport at a young age can lead to lasting negative health outcomes for children, including injury and burnout, said expert panelists during a discussion hosted by the National Athle…

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FDA Expands Use Of Achondroplasia Drug To Children Younger Than 5

Reuters (10/20, Jain, Mandowara) reported the US FDA “on Friday approved the expanded use of BioMarin Pharmaceutical’s once-daily injection to treat children under the age of 5 with the most common form of short-limbed dwarfism.” In 2021, Voxzogo (vosorit…

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FDA Approves Pentavalent Meningococcal Disease Vaccine

Reuters (10/20, Leo, Mandowara, Santhosh) reported, “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Pfizer’s vaccine Penbraya, making it the first shot to protect against five groups of a deadly bacteria that can cause meningitis and blood poiso…

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Researchers Warn About Hazards To Children Posed By Hair Styling Tools, Desk Toy Magnets, Electric Scooters

NBC News (10/20, Bendix) reported that according to research presented at the 2023 AAP National Conference & Exhibition, “children are getting burned by hair styling tools, swallowing tiny magnets found in desk toys and injuring themselves on electric sco…

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Babies Discharged From ED For Bronchiolitis Saw Mixed Benefits From Enhanced Nasal Suctioning, Trial Finds

MedPage Today (10/20, Short) reported, “Babies discharged from the emergency department (ED) for bronchiolitis saw mixed benefits from enhanced nasal suctioning, a randomized trial found.” Investigators found that “additional resource use – a composite of…

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Exposure To Maternal Diabetes In Utero May Be Associated With Increased Risk Of Depression, Anxiety Among Offspring Later In Life, Research Suggests

HCP Live (10/20, Campbell) reported that research “suggests exposure to maternal diabetes in utero could be linked to an increased risk of depression and anxiety among offspring later in life.” The findings “of the study, which examined all births occurri…

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Parents Report Ongoing Issues Finding Pediatric Versions Of Latest COVID-19 Vaccines

NPR (10/19, Fortier) reports, “On September 12, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended the next round of COVID shots for everyone 6 months and older.” However, “more than a month later, some parents report ongoing difficulties in findi…

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Most Children, Youth Receiving HIV Care At A Specialty Clinic Reported Being Interested In Telehealth Services For HIV Care, Study Suggests

The American Journal of Managed Care (10/19, Bonavitacola) reports, “Most children and youth receiving HIV care at a specialty clinic reported being interested in telehealth services for HIV care, according to” the findings of a 103-child study published…

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Children With Mental Health Disorders More Likely To Have Poor Mental And Physical Health In Young Adulthood, Study Indicates

Healio (10/19, Weldon) reports, “Children with mental health issues were more likely to have poor mental and physical health in young adulthood,” according to the findings of a 5,141-participant study published online Sept. 29 in JAMA Network Open.

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Compared With Non-LGBTQ Peers, Lesbian, Gay, And Bisexual Teens More Than Twice As Likely To Report Binge Eating, Study Indicates

HealthDay (10/19, Murez) reports, “Stigma can take a toll on lesbian, gay and bisexual teens, leading to high rates of binge-eating disorders, researchers” concluded after analyzing “data from more than 10,000 adolescents aged 10 to 14 years old who were…

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Children Exposed To Higher Levels Of Common Chemicals In The Womb More Likely To Have Higher BMI During Childhood, Study Finds

CNN (10/19, LaMotte) reports, “Children exposed to higher levels of pesticides, fungicides and synthetic chemicals while in the womb are more likely to have a higher body mass index during childhood than those exposed to lower levels of such chemicals, a….

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Research Finds The Rate Of In-Person Follow-Up Visits Was Low Following Telehealth Visits For Primary Care, But Still Higher Than After In-Person Appointments

mHealth Intelligence (10/18, Vaidya) reports “research shows that the rate of in-person follow-up visits was low following phone and video visits for primary care but still higher than after in-person appointments.” Published in the Annals of Internal Med…

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About 8M Americans Have Received Updated COVID-19 Vaccine, Data Show

CNN (10/18, Goodman, Howard) reports that about 8 million Americans, or less than 3% of the US population, have received “an updated COVID-19 vaccine since their approval in mid-September, according to” recent HHS data. That slow uptake “comes at a time w…

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Report Shows Injuries Related To Use Of E-Bikes, E-Scooters Jumped 21% In 2022

HealthDay (10/18, Murez) says a Consumer Product Safety Commission report released this week shows that injuries associated with e-bikes, e-scooters, and hoverboards “increased nearly 21% in 2022 alone, compared to 2021.” Based on data from “a nationally…

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Brain Changes Seen In Children Exposed To Gestational Diabetes In Utero May Contribute To Increased Risk Of Obesity, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (10/18, Monaco) reports, “Brain changes were seen in kids exposed to gestational diabetes in utero, which may contribute to an increased risk of obesity, according to” data derived from “a cross-sectional study of data from the Adolescent Br…

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Teaching Middle Schoolers Bike Riding Skills As Part Of Physical Education Classes May Help Improve Their Mental Health, Researchers Conclude

NPR (10/18, Godoy) reports, “Teaching middle schoolers bike riding skills as part of physical education classes may help improve their mental health,” according to “a new study that looked at the effects of a six- to eight-week cycling class taught in sch…

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Children With T1D Appear To Be Entering Into Puberty Earlier Than They Had Been Previously, Researchers Conclude

HCPlive (10/18, Campbell) reports, “Children with type 1 diabetes” (T1D) “are entering puberty earlier than they had been previously,” researchers concluded in “an analysis of more than 13,000 children with type 1 diabetes from the German Diabetes Prospec…

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Despite More Vaccines To Protect Pregnant Women From Respiratory Illnesses, Fewer Are Getting Vaccinated

NBC News (10/17, Edwards, Weaver) reports, “As the winter respiratory illness season fast approaches, this is the first year that four vaccines are being recommended during pregnancy.” However, “there are already signs that fewer pregnant women are gettin…

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Guidance On Screening Children’s Cholesterol Varies

MedPage Today (10/17, Fiore) reports, “Debate continues as to whether young children should have their cholesterol checked.” The article adds, “Pediatric cardiologists interviewed by MedPage Today acknowledge a dearth of long-term randomized controlled tr…

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Rates Of MDD Appear To Vary Among Adolescents By Race, Ethnicity, Data Suggest

HealthDay (10/17, Gotkine) reports, “The rates of major depressive disorder (MDD) vary from 14.5 to 26.5 percent among adolescents by race and ethnicity,” researchers concluded after conducting “a cross-sectional analysis of the nationally representative…

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Weak Standards Governing Federally Subsidized School Lunches Illustrate Outsize Influence Of Food Companies On School Lunches

The Washington Post (10/17, Bernstein, Weber, Keating) reports, “Decisions made…in the nation’s capital – choices heavily influenced by the food industry – brought Kraft Heinz’s signature Lunchables to” some “30 million children under the rules of the N…

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Asian, Hispanic, And Black Children Much Less Likely Than White Children To See Ear, Nose And Throat Physicians, Researchers Conclude

HealthDay (10/17, Murez) reports, “Which U.S. kids see specialists for ear infections and have tubes placed to drain fluid and improve air flow differs significantly by race,” according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Society o…

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Illinois Public Health Officials Report First Case Of Measles In More Than Four Years

USA Today (10/16, DeLetter) reports, “The Illinois Department of Public Health recently confirmed the first case of measles in the state in over four years.” Officials “reported that a suspected measles case was reported by the Cook County Department of P…

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New Video Game Technology May Help Predict What Type Of Driver A Teen Will Be, Researchers Say

According HealthDay (10/16, Mann), “a new video game technology that exposes drivers to the most common serious crash scenarios and sees how they react may help predict what type of driver” a teenager will be and could “also highlight any potential proble…

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One-Third Of US Schools Do Not Have A Full-Time Nurse, Survey Says

KFF Health News (10/16, DeGuzman) reports, “More than a third of schools nationwide don’t have a full-time nurse on-site, according to a 2021 survey by the National Association of School Nurses.” The lack of school nurses comes as the US faces “high rates…

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Respiratory Diseases Incidence Not Different In Twin Siblings When The First Was Born Vaginally And The Second Was Born Via CD, Results Show

Pulmonology Advisor (10/16, Stong) says, “The incidence of respiratory diseases was not different in twin siblings when the first was born vaginally and the second was born via cesarean delivery (CD),” researchers concluded in an analysis of 184 pairs of…

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Substantial Proportion Of Young Children From Low-Income Families Appear To Have Elevated Levels Of Emotional, Behavioral Health Problems Seen In Pediatric Primary Care, Researchers Conclude

MedPage Today (10/16, Henderson) reports, “A substantial proportion of young kids from low-income families had elevated levels of emotional and behavioral health problems seen in pediatric primary care, researchers” concluded in findings published online…

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Children Hospitalized For Rotavirus At Higher Risk Of Developing Juvenile-Onset Autoimmune Diseases, Data Indicate

Healio (10/16, Martin) reports, “Children who are hospitalized for rotavirus demonstrate a higher risk for developing juvenile-onset autoimmune diseases, including inflammatory arthritis and vasculitis, according to data published in JAMA Network Open.” T…

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Children Receiving mRNA COVID-19 Vaccines Who Still Contracted The Disease Were 48% Less Likely To Develop Post-COVID Conditions, Study Finds

MedPage Today (10/15, Sullivan) says, “Children who received mRNA COVID-19 vaccines were up to 48% less likely to develop post-COVID conditions (PCCs) if they did contract the disease, a CDC researcher reported” at IDWeek 2023. The study “was conducted du…

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Early Signs Show Spread Of Flu, COVID-19, RSV Nationwide

NBC News (10/13, Edwards) said, “Flu cases are low nationwide, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday, but there are early signs that the virus is beginning to spread.” Flu, COVID-19, and RSV “are likely to circulate this winter,”…

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Tobacco, Cannabis Use Among US Youth Increased Between 2021 And 2022, Research Shows

MedPage Today (10/13, Short) reported that tobacco and cannabis use increased among US youth from 2021 to 2022, according to CDC data highlighted during the CHEST Annual Meeting 2023. José de Jesús Méndez Castro, MD, reviewed the findings, saying they are…

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Breastfeeding Increased Protective Effect Of Maternal Flu Vaccination During Pregnancy For Infants, Study Shows

MedPage Today (10/14, Sullivan) reported, “Breastfeeding boosted the protective effect of maternal flu vaccination during pregnancy for infants, a large retrospective cohort study showed.” Investigators found that “combined, maternal vaccination plus any…

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PCR Testing Of Dried Blood Spots Demonstrates High Sensitivity In Identifying Infants With Congenital Cytomegalovirus, Study Shows

Healio (10/13, Weldon) said, “PCR testing of dried blood spots demonstrated a high sensitivity to identify infants with congenital cytomegalovirus in a study conducted in Minnesota, the first state to mandate congenital CMV testing, researchers reported.”…

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Internalizing Symptoms Among Latinx Youth During Early Adolescence Relate To Health Behaviors, Outcomes Underlying Cardiometabolic Risk During Middle And Late Adolescence, Survey Study Suggests

HealthDay (10/13, Solomon) reported, “Internalizing symptoms among Latinx youth during early adolescence relate to health behaviors and outcomes underlying cardiometabolic risk during middle and late adolescence,” investigators concluded in the findings o…

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Robust Mucosal Immune Response Appears To Prevent Severe COVID-19 Infection In Children Compared To Adults, Study Suggests

USA Today (10/14, Weintraub) reported, “It’s been clear since early in the pandemic that young children…weren’t getting very sick from COVID-19,” and now a “study suggests the answer lies in their noses.” This study “found the immune systems of young ch…

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More Than 7M Americans Have Received Updated COVID-19 Vaccines, HHS Data Indicate

Reuters (10/12, Wingrove) reports that a month after their approval, “more than 7 million Americans had rolled up their sleeves for the updated COVID-19 vaccines as of Wednesday, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, despite repor…

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Preschool, Primary School Teachers Appear To Respond Differently To Anxiety Behaviors Among Pupils With ASD, Small Study Indicates

HCPlive (10/12, Derman) reports, “For students with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who experience clinical anxiety symptoms, preschool and primary school teachers respond differently to anxiety behaviors, according to” the findings of a 139-teacher study…

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Severe Inflammation Very Early In Childhood May Hamper Development Of Key Brain Cells, Small Postmortem Study Indicates

HealthDay (10/12, Mundell) reports, “Severe inflammation very early in childhood might hamper the development of key brain cells, perhaps setting the stage for conditions such as autism or schizophrenia,” according to the findings of a 17-child postmortem…

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Alcohol And Tobacco Use Both Notably Associated With Suicide Attempts Among Adolescents During The COVID-19 Pandemic, Data Indicate

Healio (10/12, Bascom) reports, “Alcohol and tobacco use were both notably associated with suicide attempts among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to” findings presented at the Osteopathic Medical Education Conference. Data derived “fro…

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Federal Judges In Three States Block Laws Impacting Social Media, Minors

The New York Times (10/12, Singer) reports that “last fall, California lawmakers passed a sweeping online children’s privacy law aimed at regulating how some of the most popular social media and video game platforms treat minors.” However, “last month, af…

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Higher Initial Glucose Levels, Increasing BMI Over Time May Predict Progression From Prediabetes To T2D Among Children And Adolescents, Study Indicates

Healio (10/12, Monostra) reports, “Higher initial glucose levels and increasing BMI over time could serve as predictors of progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes” (T2D) “for children and adolescents, according to” the findings of a 552-child and…

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Experts Worry That Narcan Still Not Widely Accessible Despite Being Available Over The Counter

Kaiser Health News (10/11, Fortiér, Leonard) reports, “Last month, drugstores and pharmacies nationwide began stocking and selling the country’s first over-the-counter version of naloxone, a medication that can stop a potentially fatal overdose from opioi…

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Guidance Provides Updates On Determining Brain Death In Adults, Children

MedPage Today (10/11, George) reports a new practice guideline published in Neurology “updated clinicians on how they should determine death by neurologic criteria – also known as brain death – in adults and children.”

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Compared With Dexamethasone, Prenatal Use Of Predniso(lo)ne Appears To Have Fewer Side Effects, Poses Minimal Risk For Fetal Adverse Events, Systematic Review Suggests

Endocrinology Advisor (10/11, Nye) reports, “Antenatal use of predniso(lo)ne, compared with dexamethasone,” appears to have fewer side effects and poses “minimal risk for fetal adverse events,” according to the findings of a systematic review published on…

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Children From Families With Low Incomes, Families Of Color Exposed To More Neurotoxic Chemicals And Experience Greater Harm, Scoping Review Concludes

HealthDay (10/11, Solomon) reports, “Children from families with low incomes and families of color are exposed to more neurotoxic chemicals and experience greater harm,” investigators concluded in the findings of a 218-study scoping review published onlin…

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Cost, Insurance Reimbursement Complicating Rollout Of RSV Antibody

CBS News (10/11, Brand, M. Moniuszko) reports, “The CDC and FDA have approved the Beyfortus antibody shot, from drugmakers AstraZeneca and Sanofi, to prevent respiratory syncytial virus in babies from birth to 8 months old, or in children up to 24 months…

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Children Conceived Using ART Appear To Have Slightly Higher Risks Of Congenital Anomalies, Particularly Genitourinary Ones, Research Suggests

MedPage Today (10/10, Robertson) reports, “Kids conceived using assisted reproductive technology (ART) had slightly higher risks of congenital anomalies, particularly genitourinary abnormalities,” investigators concluded in the findings of “an Australian…

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Maternal Pertussis Vaccination Tied To Reduced Risk For Infection Among Infants Through Eight Months Of Age, Study Indicates

HealthDay (10/10, Gotkine) reports, “Maternal pertussis vaccination is associated with a reduced risk for infection among infants through eight months of age,” researchers concluded after having “conducted a population-based cohort study of 279,418 mother…

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Children, Adolescents With High Polygenic Risk Score For PCOS Tend To Have Higher BMI, More Likely To Develop Obesity, Research Suggests

Healio (10/10, Monostra) reports, “Children and adolescents with a high polygenic risk score for polycystic ovary syndrome” (PCOS) “tend to have a higher BMI and are more likely to develop obesity,” according to findings published in the Journal of Clinic…

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Most Adolescents Who Use E-Cigarettes Have Attempted To Quit In Past Year, But Usually Without Seeking Outside Help, Study Indicates

Healio (10/10, Weldon) reports, “Most adolescents who use e-cigarettes have attempted to quit in the past year but usually without seeking outside help,” researchers concluded in findings published online in the journal Pediatrics. The study examined “dat…

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Study Suggests New Fathers Should Also Be Screened For Postpartum Depression

HealthDay (10/6, Murez) reported a pilot study “suggests new dads should also be screened for” postpartum depression. For the study published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, “researchers interviewed and screened 24 dads using a tool commonly used for scr…

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About 1% Of Children In US Had Long Covid Through 2022, CDC Report Says

The Washington Post (10/9, Searing) reports that “although covid-19 symptoms can linger for weeks, months or years, 1 percent of children in the United States had the condition known as long covid through 2022, according to a report from the” CDC. By the…

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Children With Developmental Delays Lack Access To Federal Program

According to the AP (10/8, Savage), a program called “Early Intervention was created in 1986 to address developmental delays in children…as soon as possible.” Approximately “one in six children in the U.S. has at least one developmental disability or ot…

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As Many As 1 In 4 Teens With ASD Could Be Undiagnosed, Research Suggests

HealthDay (10/6, Collins) reported, “As many as 1 in 4 teens with autism may be undiagnosed…research suggests.” For the study published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, researchers “reviewed school and health records of close to 4,9…

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MDD Among Adolescents Rose Sharply During COVID-19 Pandemic, But Fewer Than Half Who Needed Treatment Received It, Researchers Conclude

The New York Times (10/9, Richtel) reports, “Approximately 20 percent of adolescents had symptoms of major depressive disorder” (MDD) “in 2021 – the first full calendar year of the pandemic – but less than half who needed treatment received it,” according…

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In Phase 3 Study, Once-Daily Dose Of 72 Mg Linaclotide Tied To Improved Stool Consistency In Pediatric Patients With Functional Constipation, Researchers Conclude

HCPlive (10/5, Kunzmann) reports, “A once-daily dose of 72 mg linaclotide (Linzess) was associated with significant reduction to the frequency of spontaneous bowel movements and improved stool consistency in patients with functional constipation,” investi…

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Systematic Review And Meta-Analysis Support Use Of Immunosuppressive Therapy To Achieve Native Liver Survival In Children Presenting With Autoimmune Hepatitis In Acute Liver Failure Cases

HCPlive (10/5, Kunzmann) reports, “A new systematic review and meta-analysis” presented at the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition 2023 Annual Meeting “supports the use of immunosuppressive therapy to achieve na…

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Children, Adolescents Appear Susceptible To Poor Mental Health Symptoms Based On Varying Understated Geographic And Sociodemographic Factors, Survey Data Suggest

HCPlive (10/5, Derman) reports, “Children and adolescents are susceptible to poor mental health symptoms based on varying understated geographic and sociodemographic factors,” investigators concluded in a study that drew its data from the Household Pulse…

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Approximately 220K Children In US Were Diagnosed With Arthritis Between 2017 And 2021, Data Reveal

Healio (10/5, Martin) reports, “Approximately 220,000 children in the United States were diagnosed with arthritis between 2017 and 2021, with a higher prevalence among those aged 12 to 17 years or living in a food-insecure household,” according to finding…

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Trends In Pediatric Fatal And Nonfatal Injuries Examined

The New York Times (10/5, Rabin) reports, “The rate of firearm fatalities among children under 18 increased by 87 percent from 2011 through 2021 in the” US, while “the death rate attributable to car accidents fell by almost half, leaving firearm injuries…

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Around 4M Americans Received Updated COVID-19 Vaccines In September

Reuters (10/4, Aboulenein, Erman) reports, “Around 4 million Americans received the updated COVID-19 shots in September, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), even as some people have found it difficult to book vaccination a…

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Vaping Increased Asthma Risk Among Adolescents With No Other Smoking History, Study Finds

Healio (10/4, Gawel) reports, “Vaping increased the risk for asthma among adolescents in Texas and across the” US “who had never smoked conventional tobacco products, according to a study.” The findings were published in Preventive Medicine.

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Antiviral Medications Pleconaril, Ribavirin, When Given Soon After A Child’s Diagnosis Of T1D, May Help Preserve Pancreatic Beta Cells, Researchers Posit

HealthDay (10/4, Mundell) reports, “Recent research has suggested that viruses could play a role in the loss of pancreatic beta cells, which triggers type 1 diabetes” (T1D), but “now, a new trial finds antiviral medications,” in particular, pleconaril and…

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Minority Of Families, Clinicians Willing To Have Pediatric ED Conduct Direct Oral Challenge To Delabel Penicillin Allergies In Children, Researchers Say

MedPage Today (10/4, Short) reports, “A minority of families and healthcare providers were willing to have pediatric emergency departments (EDs) conduct a direct oral challenge (DOC) to delabel penicillin allergies in children,” according to the findings…

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Fifty Percent Of Adolescents Admitted Into Psychiatric Hospital Screened Positive For Insomnia, Small Mixed-Methods Study Reveals

HCPlive (10/4, Derman) reports, “New data from a” 100-adolescent, mixed-methods study combining results from two studies “suggest sleep problems could be a contributing factor as to why adolescents get admitted to a psychiatric ward.” The data revealed th…

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Families, Physicians Express Concerns Over Insurance Coverage Of New RSV Antibody

CNN (10/4, Goodman) reports, “A highly anticipated new shot that can protect newborns from the ravages of respiratory syncytial virus may not be available to some families this season because of uncertainties about insurance coverage.” The FDA approved Be…

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FDA Approves Novavax’s Updated COVID-19 Vaccine

The AP (10/3, Neergaard) reports, “U.S. regulators on Tuesday authorized another option for fall COVID-19 vaccination, updated shots made by Novavax.” The FDA approved the “reformulated Novavax shots” for “anyone age 12 and older.” The CDC “already has ur…

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Algorithm Appears Promising To Help Reduce The Number Of Unnecessary Oophorectomies In Children, Researchers Find

MedPage Today (10/3, Henderson) reports, “A new algorithm appeared promising to help reduce the number of unnecessary oophorectomies in young patients, researchers found.” Looking at data from “11 children’s hospitals implementing the algorithm, the perce…

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Mental Health Services Spending For US Children, Adolescents Has Risen Sharply Since 2020, Researchers Say

According to HealthDay (10/3, Murez), “spending on mental health services for U.S. children and adolescents has risen sharply since 2020,” climbing “26% for youths aged 19 and younger between March 2020 and August 2022,” RAND researchers concluded. After…

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Use Of Psychotropic Medications Appears To Have Increased Exponentially In Children, Adolescents With T1D, Data Indicate

HCPlive (10/3, Campbell) reports, “New research of national registries in Europe suggests use of psychotropic medications, such as hypnotics,” attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) “medications, and antidepressants, has increased exponentially…

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As New Shots Roll Out, Parents Say They Are Running Into Barriers To Vaccinating Young Children Against COVID-19

CNN (10/3, Goodman) reports, “Parents of young children are scrambling to find still-scarce doses of the updated Covid-19 vaccine, which was recommended in mid-September for everyone ages 6 months and older.” However, even “when they can find it, some say…

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Breastfeeding In Infancy May Be Associated With Lower Percentage Of Body Fat Later In Childhood, Study Concludes

According to HealthDay (10/2, Murez), research indicates that nine-year-old children “who had been breast-fed for six months or more had a lower percentage of body fat than their peers who were never breast-fed or received breast milk,” according to findi…

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Physicians, Parents Face Challenges In Getting New COVID-19 Vaccine For Children

The Washington Post (10/2, Sun, Nirappil) reports, “The troubled rollout of updated coronavirus vaccines is proving especially challenging for physicians and parents seeking to immunize children – a reflection of distribution delays, shortages at pharmaci…

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FDA Warns Hospitals About Using Probiotics In Infants Born Prematurely

CNN (10/2, Viswanathan) reports, “After the death of a preterm baby who was given a probiotic in a hospital, the” FDA “is warning hospitals about using probiotics in infants born prematurely.” The agency, “in a warning letter Friday…cautioned health car…

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Childhood Verbal Abuse Can Be As Damaging To Development As Sexual Or Physical Abuse, Research Finds

CNN (10/2, Ronald) reports that research has found that “parents, teachers, coaches and other adults shouting at, denigrating or verbally threatening children can be as damaging to their development as sexual or physical abuse.” The research, “which studi…

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Child Diagnosed With ASD At 12-26 Months Of Age May Not Meet Diagnostic Criteria For Autism Years Later, Researchers Say

HCPlive (10/2, Derman) reports, “A child diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at 12-26 months of age may not meet the diagnostic criteria for autism years later,” investigators concluded in the findings of a 213-child “cohort study” published onl…

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CMS Asks States To Provide A Year Of Continuous Coverage For Children On Medicaid, CHIP Starting January 2024

Healthcare Finance News (10/2, Lagasse) reports, “In a letter to state health officials late last week…the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services reiterated that states must provide 12 months of continuous coverage for children under the age of 19 o…

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Children, Teens In The US Dying Of Gun-Related Homicides And Suicides In Record Numbers, CDC Data Indicate

CNN (10/2, Choi) reports, “Children and teens in the US are dying of gun-related homicides and suicides in record numbers, according to the most recent data from the” CDC. In 2021, “there were 2,279 firearm homicides in children and teens (ages one to 18)…

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WHO Removes Influenza B/Yamagata From Recommendations On Which Influenza Viruses To Target In Vaccines

CNN (9/29, Gumbrecht) reported that when the WHO “recommended on Friday which influenza viruses to target in vaccines for next year, it removed a family of viruses that hasn’t been seen since the early days of the Covid-19 pandemic.” As COVID-19 started “…

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Black Children Have More Severe Asthma Episodes Than White Children But Use Less EMS Transport, Study Finds

Healio (9/29, Gawel) reported, “Black children were more likely to require EMS and receive bronchodilator treatment for an asthma episode than white children, but were less likely to receive EMS transport, according to a study.” Healio added, “These adjus…

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Autism Diagnosis In Boys Linked To Mothers’ Diet Soda Consumption During Pregnancy, Study Suggests

The Hill (9/29, Stark) reported “a team of researchers say they have observed a link between autism diagnosis in boys and their mothers drinking at least one diet soda daily or consuming an equivalent amount of the sweetener aspartame during pregnancy or…

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Hundreds Of Children Die Each Year Due To Unprepared EDs Across US

The Wall Street Journal (10/1, Whyte, Evans, Subscription Publication) reports on the lack of emergency departments (EDs) in the US that are certified as prepared to treat kids. This leads to hundreds of children dying or leaving the hospital severely inj…

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Children With Atopic Dermatitis More Likely To Test Positive For Allergies In Patch Testing, Study Suggests

According to HealthDay (9/29, Murez), “children with atopic dermatitis were more likely to test positive for allergies in patch testing,” researchers concluded in findings published online ahead of print in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatolo…

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CDC Director Urges Americans To Get Flu, COVID-19 Shots As Data Show Drop In Vaccination Rates

The Hill (9/28, Weixel) reports, “Vaccination rates for COVID-19 and the flu have declined, and a significant portion of the U.S. population indicated they are not interested in getting either this year, according to a new survey.” The poll conducted by “…

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Coffee During Pregnancy Does Not Increase Risk For Premature Birth, But Smoking Does, Research Suggests

HealthDay (9/28, Murez) reports, “Smoking during pregnancy is a significant risk factor for premature births, but drinking coffee is not…research suggests.” Investigators found that people “who smoked during pregnancy were 2.6 times more likely to give…

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HRSA Awards $88M To Improve Maternal Health In US

Healio (9/28) reports the US “Health Resources and Services Administration awarded $88 million to improve maternal health across the country, according to a press release.” The awards “support the White House Blueprint for Addressing the Maternal Health C…

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Adolescents With Parents Who Drank Regularly, Binge Drank Are Four Times More Likely To Drink Themselves, Study Finds

CNN (9/28, Holcombe) reports “adolescents whose parents drank regularly or binge drank were four times more likely to drink themselves, according to a study.” The reason behind “that connection could be tied to multiple things like modeling, alcohol acces…

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COVID-19 Vaccine During Pregnancy Passes Protection Against Virus To Newborns, CDC Study Finds

CBS News (9/28, Tin) reports “getting a shot of the COVID-19 vaccine during pregnancy works to pass on protection against the virus to newborns during their most vulnerable early months of life, a new study published by the” CDC reported. The study found…

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HHS Receives Commitment From Health Insurance Industry To Cover COVID-19 Vaccines

The Hill (9/27, Choi) reports, “The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) met with representatives from the health insurance industry on Wednesday, receiving commitments that the updated COVID-19 vaccines will be covered after reports arose of som…

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FDA Approves Bosutinib For Treatment Of Certain Pediatric Patients With Ph+ CP-CML

OncLive (9/27, Ryan) reports, “The FDA has approved bosutinib (Bosulif) for the treatment of pediatric patients 1 year of age and older with Philadelphia chromosome (Ph)–positive, chronic-phase chronic myelogenous leukemia (CP-CML) that is newly diagnosed…

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Antidepressants Do Not Induce Mania, Hypomania In Pediatric Patients With Unipolar Depression, Research Suggests

HCP Live (9/27, Derman) reports that “research…suggests that antidepressants do not induce mania or hypomania in pediatric patients with unipolar depression.” The findings were published in JAMA Psychiatry.

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Nebraska Expands Postpartum Medicaid Coverage For Low-Income Mothers To One Year

The AP (9/27) reports, “Lower-income new mothers will get a full year of Medicaid health care coverage in Nebraska under an order issued Wednesday by Republican Gov. Jim Pillen.” The policy “makes Nebraska the latest in a growing list of Republican-led st…

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Montana Judge Temporarily Blocks State Ban On Gender-Affirming Care For Minors

The New York Times (9/27, Londoño) reports, “A state judge in Montana on Wednesday temporarily blocked a law that would have banned transition care for children under 18 starting on Sunday, while a lawsuit filed by patients and medical professionals proce…

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Low-Income Children, Children Of Color Disproportionately Impacted By Exposure To Harmful Chemicals, Study Finds

STAT (9/27, Nayak, Subscription Publication) reports, “Children are often exposed to harmful chemicals in air, water, soil, food, food packaging, and plastics,” but “low-income children and children of color are disproportionately impacted by these exposu…

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Women With Higher Levels Of Phthalates Had Higher Risk Of Postpartum Depression, Study Finds

HealthDay (9/26, Murez) reports that researchers have “found that women with higher levels of phthalates – especially those found in personal care items and plastic consumer products – had an increased risk of postpartum depression.” The research was publ…

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Research Provides Overview Of Motivations, Expectations Of Parents Who Contacted Out-Of-Hours Primary Care For Their Child’s Acute Gastroenteritis

HCP Live (9/26, Brooks) reports, “Results from a qualitative study of parents who contacted out-of-hours primary care for their child’s acute gastroenteritis are providing an overview of parental motivations and expectations for seeking additional medical…

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Families Push States To Mandate Coverage Of Hearing Aids For Children

CNN (9/26, Gumbrecht) reports, “Hearing loss affects thousands of children each year and is one of the most common conditions present at birth, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” The NIH “says that about 2 or 3 of every 1,000…

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HHS Announces $131.7M To Support Behavioral Health

Healthcare Finance News (9/26, Morse) reports, “The Department of Health and Human Services, through the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), has announced $131.7 million in grant programs for behavioral health services.” Ad…

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Report Finds Children Are Inundated With Phone Prompts, Including During School Hours

NBC News (9/26, Snow) says, “A…report about kids and their smartphone use may offer other parents a warning: Children…are inundated with hundreds of pings and prompts on their phones all day and all night – even when they should be paying attention in…

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CDC Launches PR Campaign To “Reset Expectations” Around Flu Vaccine

CBS News (9/25, Tin) reports the CDC “says it has launched a new public relations campaign this year to ‘reset expectations’ around the influenza vaccine, after the agency’s consumer research found some Americans misunderstand the benefits of the annual s…

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Many Online Marijuana Dispensaries Fail To Enforce Age Limits On Purchases, Study Finds

The New York Times (9/25, Richtel) reports “many online marijuana dispensaries do not enforce age limits on purchases, and they have other lax policies that enable minors to buy cannabis on the internet, according to a new study published” in JAMA Pediatr…

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Respiratory Infections Occurred More Frequently Among Babies, Toddlers Living In Urban Vs. Rural Areas, Study Finds

Healio (9/25, Hornick) reports, “Respiratory infections occurred more frequently among babies and toddlers living in urban vs. rural areas, according to” research. Healio adds, “Different airway immune profiles at age 4 weeks associated with urban living….

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Shortage Of Chemotherapy Drugs For Children Worsens

NBC News (9/25, Lovelace) reports pediatric cancer physicians “are sounding the alarm about a growing shortage of chemotherapy drugs for children.” Reports from children’s hospitals “are pointing to supply problems for two…chemotherapy drugs that are co…

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Children Do Better In Elementary School When Fathers Regularly Interact With Them, Study Finds

HealthDay (9/25, Roberts Murez) reports “a new study from the United Kingdom finds that kids do better in elementary school when their fathers regularly spend time interacting with them through reading, playing, telling stories, drawing or singing.” While…

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CDC Recommends RSV Vaccine For Pregnant Women To Protect Infants

The Washington Post (9/22, Malhi) reported, “Federal regulators recommended on Friday that expectant mothers get an RSV vaccine to protect their newborns from the potentially deadly respiratory disease.” A CDC advisory panel has recommended the vaccine “f…

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For Patients With Pediatric Acute Sinusitis, Treatment Failure With Amoxicillin-Clavulanate Similar Compared To Amoxicillin Alone, Research Finds

MedPage Today (9/22, Short) reported, “Treatment failure with amoxicillin-clavulanate for pediatric acute sinusitis was similar compared with amoxicillin alone, but the broad-spectrum antibiotic may be associated with more adverse events, an examination o…

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Beginning Of School Year Linked To Increased ED Visits For Mental Health Conditions Among Children 5 To 17, CDC Report Finds

HealthDay (9/22, Reinberg) said, “While the start of the school year can give kids and teens the chance to reconnect with friends and enjoy school sports and activities, it can also trigger stressors that send many to the emergency [department] for mental…

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Intervention Reduces Antibiotic Use In Pediatric Conjunctivitis By Up To 19% Without Increasing Treatment Failure, Study Finds

Healio (9/22, Weldon) reported, “An intervention undertaken by dozens of health centers reduced antibiotic use for pediatric conjunctivitis by up to 19% without increasing treatment failure, according to study findings.” For the study, researchers “implem…

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Researchers Find Lower Socioeconomic Status Leads To Poorer Health For Preschoolers

Healio (9/22, Schaffer) reported, “Preschool-aged children of lower socioeconomic status have poorer health and derive less benefit from the same lifestyle interventions delivered to preschoolers of higher socioeconomic status, according to study findings…

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New COVID-19 Vaccine Campaign Facing Supply, Insurance Coverage Issues

The Hill (9/21, Choi) says, “The launch of the newly approved COVID-19 vaccines, the first campaign since the federal pandemic emergency ended, is off to a bumpy start. Reports are piling up of insured Americans being stuck with the nearly $200 bill for s…

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Cough, Shortness Of Breath Are Frequently Occurring Symptoms Of RSV Infection In Pediatric Patients, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (9/21, Stong) reports, “Cough and shortness of breath are frequently occurring symptoms of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in pediatric patients aged 5 years and younger, according to” a study. The findings were published i…

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CMS Estimates That Nearly 500K People Were Improperly Removed From Medicaid

The Washington Post (9/21, Goldstein) reports that “nearly half a million children and other individuals in 30 states have been improperly dropped from Medicaid rolls, prompting federal health officials to halt in more than half the country a large portio…

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Suicide Ranks As Either The Seventh- Or Eighth-Leading Cause Of Death Among Children Ages Five To 11, CDC Says

KFF Health News (9/21, Weinstock) reports, “Suicide ranks as either the seventh- or eighth-leading cause of death among children ages five to 11, according to the” CDC “and recent studies.” What’s more, “numbers show the rates among younger kids appear to…

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Infants Who Demonstrate Microbiome Dysregulation At Higher Risk For JIA, Researchers Say

Healio (9/21, Martin) reports, “Infants who demonstrate microbiome dysregulation may be at a higher risk for juvenile idiopathic arthritis” (JIA), researchers concluded after analyzing “data from the All Babies in Southern Sweden population cohort, which…

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New COVID-19 Vaccine Rollout Stymied By Insurance Issues, Supply Shortages

CNN (9/20, Goodman, Musa, McPhillips, Tirrell) reports, “It has been just over a week since the US Food and Drug Administration and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention gave their nods to updated Covid-19 vaccines, which they have urged Ameri…

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Biden Administration Revives Program Offering Free COVID-19 Tests

The Washington Post (9/20, Nirappil) reports, “Just as a summer covid wave shows signs of receding, the Biden administration announced Wednesday that it is reviving a program to mail free rapid coronavirus tests to Americans.” Starting September 25, “peop…

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Endometriosis Significantly Tied To Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes, Researchers Say

Healio (9/20, Welsh) reports, “Endometriosis was significantly associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes, ranging from preterm labor and birth to antepartum and postpartum hemorrhage, researchers” concluded in the findings of a 1,251,597-woman study publ…

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Adolescents And Young Adults With UC Are Unlikely To Adhere To Maintenance Oral 5-Aminosalicylic Acid During First Year Of Treatment, Study Finds

HCP Live (9/20, Brooks) reports, “Adolescents and young adults with ulcerative colitis (UC) are unlikely to adhere to maintenance oral 5-aminosalicylic acid…during their first year of treatment, putting them at a greater risk of early disease relapse, a…

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Number Of Babies Born With Syphilis Increased 10-Fold In Mississippi From 2016-2022, Report Finds

ABC News (9/20, Kekatos) says, “Between 2016 and 2022, congenital syphilis cases rose from 10 to 110” in Mississippi, “marking a 1,000% increase, according to a report from the John D. Bower School of Population Health at University of Mississippi Medical…

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TEACH Program Has Potential To Ease Fatigue, Depression, Pain Symptoms In Childhood-Onset SLE, Researchers Say

Healio (9/20, Martin) reports, “A program using cognitive behavioral and mindfulness meditation techniques demonstrated early potential to ease fatigue, depression and pain symptoms in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus” (SLE), researchers concl…

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Experts Hopeful More Americans Will Begin Treating COVID-19 Shots As Annual Vaccinations Similar To The Flu

CNN (9/19, Tirrell) reports that CDC data indicate “just fewer than half of all adults and about 58% of kids” receive a seasonal flu vaccine every year. But COVID-19 shots “have a ways to go to catch up. Just 21% of US adults received a bivalent booster,…

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Low-Level Red-Light Therapy At Varied Powers Appears To Effectively Control, Reduce Myopia Progression In Children, Research Suggests

Healio (9/19, Young) reports, “Low-level red-light therapy at varied powers effectively controlled and reduced myopia progression in children,” researchers concluded in a study that “enrolled 200 children aged six to 15 years with myopia and astigmatism l…

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USPSTF Issues Finalized Recommendation Statement On Expanded Screening For Hypertensive Disorders Of Pregnancy

CNN (9/19, Musa) reports, “Everyone who is pregnant should be screened for disorders such as gestational hypertension and preeclampsia with blood pressure monitoring throughout the pregnancy, the US Preventive Services Task Force” (USPSTF) concluded in a…

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FDA Advisers To Discuss Regulations, Ethics Of Artificial Wombs Intended To Help Premature Babies Survive

CNN (9/19, Christensen) reports that FDA advisers will be “meeting this week to discuss the regulations, ethics and possibilities of creating an artificial womb to increase the chances that extremely premature babies would survive — and without long-term…

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Parents, Caregivers Underappreciate High Blood Pressure Significance In Children, Research Finds

Healio (9/19, Schaffer) reports, “Data from qualitative interviews show parents and caregivers understand and worry about hypertension as a chronic disease, yet expressed little concern when high BP was noted for their children in the clinic, researchers”…

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Experts Say Home Tests Still Work To Detect COVID-19

CNN (9/18, Goodman) reports, “With Covid-19 cases up across the country, many people are once again relying on home tests to guide decisions about going to work and sending their kids to school and other activities.” However, “a lot of those tests will co…

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People Across 10 States Have Now Been Infected By COVID-19 Variant BA.2.86

CBS News (9/18, Tin) reports, “People across at least 10 states have now been infected by BA.2.86, a highly mutated variant of the virus that causes COVID-19 that authorities have been closely tracking.” The variant now has been found “in samples from Col…

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Transgender And Gender-Diverse Adolescents Report High Menstrual Suppression Effectiveness, Satisfaction In Cross-Sectional Study

Healio (9/18, Welsh) reports, “Transgender and gender-diverse adolescents reported high menstrual suppression effectiveness and satisfaction,” investigators concluded in the findings of a cross-sectional study published in online in the journal Obstetrics…

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High Medication Burden Appears To Persist Throughout Adolescence After Pediatric Heart Surgery, Researchers Posit

Healio (9/18, Schaffer) reports, “Children who underwent cardiac surgery had a high medication burden that often persisted throughout adolescence, with medication expenditures often 10-fold higher compared with those who did not have heart surgery,” inves…

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Pregnant People Who Received Effective Multidrug-Resistant TB Treatment Regimens Had Positive Outcomes With No Major Negative Impacts On Their Infants, Study Finds

Healio (9/18, Stulpin) reports, “Pregnant women who received effective multidrug-resistant/rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis treatment regimens had positive outcomes with no major negative impacts on their infants, researchers reported.” In the study publ…

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Study Reveals Nearly 300% Increase In Annual Frequency Of Cases Of Pediatric Out-Of-Hospital Therapeutic Errors Related To ADHD Medications

HealthDay (9/18, Gotkine) reports, “From 2000 to 2021, there was an almost 300 percent increase in the annual frequency of cases of pediatric out-of-hospital therapeutic errors related to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD medications,” resear…

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Healthcare Workers Worried New Mask Guidelines Proposed By CDC Advisors Will Leave Them Vulnerable To Airborne Pathogens

NBC News (9/16, Maxmen) reported, “Nurses, researchers and workplace safety officers worry new guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention might reduce protection against the coronavirus and other airborne pathogens in hospitals.” An ad…

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Fewer Than Half Of Rural Hospitals Now Have Maternity Units

The AP (9/17, Rush, Ungar) reported, “A growing number of rural hospitals have been shuttering their labor and delivery units, forcing pregnant women to travel longer distances for care or face giving birth in an emergency” department. In fact, “fewer tha…

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More Children With Asthma Who Were Treated With Dupilumab Met Criteria As Responders In Percent Predicted FEV1 Measurements, Research Finds

Healio (9/15, Gawel) reported, “More children with asthma who were treated with dupilumab than placebo met criteria as responders in percent predicted FEV1 measurements, according to an abstract presented at the European Respiratory Society International…

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Nemolizumab Safe, Effective In Improving QOL In Children With Atopic Dermatitis Whose Pruritus Is Not Improved With Topical Treatments, Antihistamines, Phase 3 Study Concludes

Dermatology Advisor (9/15, Kuhns) reported, “Nemolizumab is a safe and effective treatment, improving the quality of life (QOL) in children with atopic dermatitis (AD) whose pruritus is not improved with topical treatments and antihistamines, according to…

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Text Messages, Phone Calls Increase COVID-19 Vaccination Among Children With Sickle Cell Disease, Study Finds

Healio (9/15, Weldon) reported, “Outreach efforts in the form of text messages and phone calls succeeded in increasing COVID-19 vaccination among children with sickle cell disease, according to a study published in Pediatrics.” The study “spanned 9 months…

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Following Death Of 10-Month-Old Child, Colorful Water-Absorbent Beads Recalled

According to the Washington Post (9/14, Mark), on Sept. 14, the Consumer Product Safety Commission urged “owners of the Chuckle & Roar Ultimate Water Beads Activity Kit by Buffalo Games” to “immediately take them away from their kids…citing the death of…

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Study Suggests New Standard Cutoff For Determining UTIs In Febrile Children Undergoing Bladder Catheterization

Healio (9/14, Weldon) reports, “Data from a new study” published online in the journal Pediatrics “suggested a new standard cutoff for determining urinary tract infections” (UTIs) “in febrile children undergoing bladder catheterization.” The 341-child stu…

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Peer Victimization Or Bullying, Suicidality Tied To Frequent Recurrent Headaches Among Adolescents, Study Indicates

Neurology Advisor (9/14, Lopez) reports, “Peer victimization, or bullying, and suicidality are associated with frequent recurrent headaches among adolescents,” investigators concluded in the findings of a 2,268,840-participant, “cross-sectional, populatio…

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Maternal Omega-3 Supplementation May Contribute To Decreases In Risks For Food Allergy Among Infants, Meta-Analysis Suggests

Healio (9/14, Gawel) reports, “Maternal omega-3 supplementation contributed to decreases in risks for food allergy among infants, including egg and peanut sensitization, according to” the findings of a 12-study meta-analysis published online in the Journa…

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Daycare Center Dust Microbiota Profile Of Streptococcus And Lactococcus Raises Risk Of Wheezing Among Children, Study Says

Healio (9/14, Hornick) reports, “Children attending daycare centers with a dust microbiota profile of Streptococcus and Lactococcus faced an increased likelihood for wheezing, according to” researchers who “analyzed 103 daycare center floor dust samples”…

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Overdose Deaths Reach New Heights, Latest CDC Data Show

CNN (9/13, McPhillips) reports, “Drug overdose deaths reached another record level in the United States this spring, new data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows, as 2023 is on track to be another devastating year amid the drug ep…

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Pharmacies Say COVID-19 Vaccines Could Arrive As Soon As This Week

Reuters (9/13, Santhosh) reports, “Drugstore chains CVS Health and Walgreens Boots Alliance said on Wednesday that updated COVID-19 vaccines would be available at their stores as soon as this week.” The FDA “has approved an updated vaccine made by Pfizer…

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Screening Device Appears To Directly Detect Amblyopia, Strabismus With High Sensitivity In Pediatric Patients, Researchers Conclude

Healio (9/13, Young) reports, “The blinq” (Rebion Inc.) “screening device directly detected amblyopia and strabismus with high sensitivity in pediatric patients, according to” the findings of a 267-child study published in the American Journal of Ophthalm…

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Air Pollutant Exposure During Pregnancy May Negatively Impact Autophagy In Healthy Newborns, Study Finds

Healio (9/13, Hornick) reports, “Traffic-related pollutant exposure during pregnancy may negatively impact autophagy in healthy newborns, according to” research. The findings were presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.

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Family-Based Residential Treatment Programs For Addiction Often Struggle To Stay Afloat Due To Staffing Shortages, Volatile Funding

KFF Health News (9/13, Saint Louis) reports, “Family-based residential treatment” for addiction “has been recognized by behavioral health professionals as having better outcomes for women and their children,” but these “programs often struggle to stay afl…

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Study Suggests Vertical HPV Transmission Likely Occurs Between Parents And Their Offspring

Infectious Disease Advisor (9/13, Kuhns) reports, “Genotype-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) concordance was observed between newborns and their mother and/or father, suggesting that vertical HPV transmission likely occurs between parents and their off…

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Parents In China, The US Still Modeling Old-Fashioned Gender Roles Which Children Normalize At Very Young Ages, Researchers Say

HealthDay (9/12, Mann) reports, “Parents in China and the United States are still modeling old-fashioned gender roles such as mom doing the cooking and cleaning and dad working outside of the home, and kids are picking up on this and normalizing it at ver…

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ED Pediatric Readiness Tied To Decreased Mortality Among Children With Both Acute Medical Emergencies, Traumatic Injuries, Research Suggests

Healio (9/12, Rhoades) reports, “ED pediatric readiness was associated with decreased mortality among children with both acute medical emergencies and traumatic injuries,” according to findings published online in JAMA Network Open, The 633,536-child stud…

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Data Suggest Lead Exposure In 2019 Alone Was Attributable To More Than 5.5 Million CVD Deaths And Loss Of 765 Million IQ Points For Young Children Globally

Healio (9/12, Schaffer) reports, “World Bank data suggest lead exposure in 2019 alone was attributable to more than 5.5 million CVD deaths and the loss of 765 million IQ points for young children globally, with the greatest impact in low- and middle-incom…

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Annual Pediatric Hospitalizations Decreased Substantially In The US During Recent 10-Year Span, Data Indicate

Healio (9/12, Weldon) reports, “Annual pediatric hospitalizations decreased substantially in the United States during a recent 10-year span, with the largest decreases seen at rural and urban nonteaching hospitals,” investigators concluded after examining…

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CDC Recommends All Americans 6 Months And Older Receive At Least One Dose Of Updated COVID-19 Vaccine

The New York Times (9/12, Mandavilli) reports the CDC “recommended on Tuesday that all Americans 6 months and older receive at least one dose of the latest Covid shots, the last of a trifecta of vaccines intended to prevent another surge in respiratory in…

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FDA Approves New Round Of COVID-19 Boosters

The New York Times (9/11, Jewett, Weiland) reports, “The Food and Drug Administration approved a new round of Covid boosters on Monday, that will arrive alongside the seasonal flu vaccine and shots to protect infants and older adults from R.S.V.” On Tuesd…

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Living In Racially Segregated Neighborhood Tied To Higher Levels Of Lead Exposure Among Black Children, Research Suggests

Healio (9/11, Weldon) reports, “Living in a racially segregated neighborhood is associated with higher levels of lead exposure among Black children,” investigators concluded after studying “records from the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Se…

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Infants With More Mature Microbiota Had Less Allergy-Related Wheeze Or Asthma In Early Childhood, Research Finds

Healio (9/11, Gawel) reports, “Infants with more mature microbiota had less allergy-related wheeze or asthma in early childhood, according to” research. The findings were presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress.

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MIST Appears Not To Reduce Death In Preterm Infants With Respiratory Distress Syndrome, And Survivors Of ARDS At High Risk Of Readmission IN First Two Months Of Discharge, Studies Indicate

MedPage Today (9/11, Henderson) reports, “A randomized trial” published in JAMA “showed that minimally invasive surfactant therapy (MIST) did not reduce the incidence of death or neurodevelopmental disability among preterm infants with respiratory distres…

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Both Victims, Perpetrators Of Cyberbullying Are More Likely Than Other Youths To Experience Eating Disorder Symptoms, Survey Study Suggests

Healio (9/11, Weldon) reports, “Both victims and perpetrators of cyberbullying are more likely than other youths to experience eating disorder symptoms,” researchers concluded after studying “responses from 10,258 adolescents in the U.S. aged 10 to 14 yea…

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CPSC Advances Proposal To Create First Federal Requirements For Nursing Pillows

NBC News (9/11, Chuck) reports, “The Consumer Product Safety Commission has advanced a proposal to create the first federal requirements for nursing pillows after dozens of infant deaths in recent years.” CPSC commissioners “voted unanimously on Friday to…

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Pediatric Healthcare System Totaled More Than $250K In Antibiotic Waste Over Two Years, Mostly On Discarded Antibiotics, Study Indicates

Healio (9/8, Weldon) reported, “A pediatric healthcare system totaled more than $250,000 in antibiotic waste over the course of two years – most of it on discarded antibiotics,” investigators concluded in findings published online in the journal Infection…

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DNA Methylation Among Newborns Was Associated With Asthma Acquisition In Adolescence, Partially Mediated By Pre-Adolescent Atopy, Research Suggests

Healio (9/8, Gawel) reported, “DNA methylation among newborns was associated with asthma acquisition in adolescence, partially mediated by pre-adolescent atopy, according to a letter published in Clinical & Experimental Allergy.” Additionally, “cytosine-p…

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Youth With AD/HD May See Mildly Different Growth Trajectories With Certain Popular Medications, Researchers Say

MedPage Today (9/9, Monaco) reported, “Youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder” (AD/HD) “saw mildly different growth trajectories with certain popular medications, researchers reported” in findings presented in a poster at Psych Congress 2023….

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Pregnant Women Who Resided Near Forests, Parks Had Reduced Odds For Having Low-Birth Weight Babies, Which May Impact Infant Lung Health, Study Finds

Healio (9/8, Hornick) reported, “Pregnant women who lived near forests and parks had reduced odds for having low-birth weight babies, which may impact infant lung health, according to” research. The findings were presented at the European Respiratory Soci…

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Social Media Facing Turning Point As Experts Study Whether Excessive Use May Have Detrimental Effect On Youth Mental Health

ABC News (9/10, Charalambous) reports, “After two decades of radically changing the way we interact with others, social media may be facing a turning point, as experts study whether excessive use may have a detrimental impact” on the mental health of US y…

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Experts Remain Optimistic Current COVID-19 Outbreak Will Be Manageable

The New York Times (9/7, Mandavilli) reports that “a steady uptick” of COVID-19 infections since July “and reports of worrisome new variants have fueled concern that the virus is poised to make a comeback this fall and winter.” However, “in interviews, ex…

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Parents Who Were Large Babies Appear More Likely To Give Birth To A Large Baby, Research Suggests

HealthDay (9/7, Murez) reports, “New research” published online in the journal Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology suggests that “parents who were large babies are more likely to give birth to a large baby.” Investigators came to this conclusion by comb…

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Pediatric Treatment Protocols Outperformed Standard Therapy For AYAs With Philadelphia Chromosome-Negative ALL, Study Shows

MedPage Today (9/7, Bankhead) reports, “Pediatric treatment protocols outperformed standard therapy for adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), a retrospective cohort study showed.” Inves…

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Pfizer, Valneva Announce Lyme Disease Vaccine Candidate Showed Strong Immune Response In Children, Adolescents After Booster Shot

Reuters (9/7, Goury-Laffont) reports, “Pfizer and French pharmaceutical peer Valneva announced on Thursday that a phase 2 study for its VLA15 Lyme disease vaccine candidate showed a ‘strong immune response’ in both children and adolescents a month after a…

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CDC Ad Campaign Aims To Instill Confidence In Seasonal Flu Vaccines

CNN (9/6, Goodman) reports, “Some Americans have given up on flu shots because almost everyone remembers a season when they got one and then got sick anyway.” As a result, the CDC “wants to reset expectations about what these annual vaccines can and can’t…

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Biden Administration Commits $100M To Train More Nurses

The Hill (9/6, John) reports, “The Biden administration is committing $100 million to recruit more nurses.” Carole Johnson, Health Resources and Services Administration administrator, said, “It really is an opportunity for us to bring more people into the…

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Management Of Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa Requires Timely Clinical Response And Life-Saving Procedures, Study Finds

Healio (9/6, Capaldo) reports, “The management of dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa – the most severe type of this rare condition – requires a timely clinical response and life-saving procedures, according to a study.” The findings were published in Pediat…

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Serum Neurofilament Light Chain Z Scores Were Linked To Higher Effect Size Metrics And More Accurate Estimation Of Persistent Neuroaxonal Damage In Pediatric Populations, Study Finds

Healio (9/6, Herpen) reports that researchers have found that “compared with absolute values, serum neurofilament light chain Z scores were linked to higher effect size metrics and more accurate estimation of persistent neuroaxonal damage in pediatric pop…

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Pediatric-Inspired Protocols And Hyper-CVAD Conferred Comparable Survival For Adolescents And Young Adults With Philadelphia Chromosome-Negative Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Research Finds

Healio (9/6, Leiser) reports, “Pediatric-inspired protocols and hyper-CVAD conferred comparable survival for adolescents and young adults with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia, according to study results.” Investigators found…

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Children And Adolescents With Atopic Dermatitis Treated With Long-Term Dupilumab Showed Positive Results, Acceptable Safety, Researchers Find

Healio (9/6, Forand) reports, “Children and adolescents with atopic dermatitis treated with long-term dupilumab showed positive results and acceptable safety, according to a meta-analysis of multiple studies.” The findings were published in Pediatric Derm…

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FDA Plans To Approve New COVID-19 Boosters As Soon As Friday, Sources Say

NBC News (9/6, Lovelace, Alba) reports, “The Food and Drug Administration plans to greenlight updated versions of the Covid booster as early as Friday, according to four people familiar with the agency’s plans.” However, “the Friday timeline for authoriza…

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FDA Tentatively Approves HIV-1 Drug Combination For Children

Bloomberg Law (9/5, Moon, Subscription Publication) reports the FDA this week tentatively approved a Viatris-developed “drug cocktail for children with HIV-1.” The abacavir-dolutegravir-lamivudine oral suspension “was approved through the President’s Emer…

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Follow-Up Data Indicate HPV Vaccination Highly Effective After 10 Years

Healio (9/5, Weldon) reports, “A study of 10-year follow-up data showed no cases of high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and few cases of HPV infection among almost 1,300 boys and girls who received the 9-valent HPV vaccine, according to results published…

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Increase In COVID-19 Cases Raising Anxiety Around Possibility That Schools Could Implement Mask Mandates, Close Down

The Hill (9/5, Choi, Lonas) reports, “COVID-19 cases are on the rise and raising anxiety around the possibility that schools could implement mask mandates or close down again,” although “few schools have taken those steps so far, and superintendents conte…

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Eye-Tracking Technology May Predict Expert Diagnoses Of ASD With High Specificity, Sensitivity, Research Suggests

NBC News (9/5, Herzberg, Carroll) reports, “A device that follows kids’ eye movements as they watch a video showing a social interaction between two children may help speed up diagnoses of autism spectrum disorder” (ASD), investigators concluded in resear…

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Suicides By Americans Aged 10 To 24 Continuing To Climb, Data Indicate

HealthDay (9/5, Mundell) reports, “Suicides by Americans aged 10 to 24 are continuing to climb and guns are increasingly the method of choice in these tragedies,” according to a study that examined “U.S. federal data on all suicide deaths among people age…

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CDC Warns About Increase In RSV Cases In Children In Florida, Georgia

NBC News (9/5, Edwards) reports the CDC “alerted doctors Tuesday about a rise in severe cases of RSV among young children in Florida and Georgia.” The rise in cases “appears to suggest that RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, is once again falling into a…

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Regardless Of Initial Treatment Strategy, Treatment-To-Target Approach Appears Effective In Reducing Pain In Patients With Non-Systemic JIA, Study Indicates

HCPlive (9/1, Pine) reported, “A treatment-to-target approach is effective in reducing pain in patients with non-systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) regardless of the initial treatment strategy,” investigators concluded in findings published onli…

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Medication Shortages For ADHD Affecting High School And College Students At Start Of New School Year

CNN (9/4, Bonifield) reported on how medication shortages for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are affecting high school and college students as this year’s school season begins. Currently, 11 pharmaceutical makers “are lis…

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Late Preterm Infants Appear At Risk For Learning Problems That Can Be Overcome, Research Suggests

HealthDay (9/1, Murez) reported, “Infants born three to six weeks early – considered late preterm – are at risk for learning problems, but they can be overcome, researchers” concluded in a study that “tracked academic progress for 1,200 late preterm infan…

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In-Utero Exposure To Phthalates Found In Plastics Tied To Developmental Issues In Toddler Boys, Research Suggests

HealthDay (9/4, Murez) reported, “Phthalates are commonly used in plastics, and researchers have now tied them to developmental issues in toddler boys who were exposed to the chemical in the womb,” according to a study that “links the chemicals to emotion…

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Getting More Hours Of Sleep May Help Reduce Impulsive Behavior In Children, Data Indicate

HealthDay (9/1, Murez) reported, “Getting more hours of slumber could reduce impulsive behavior in” children, investigators concluded after analyzing data on some 11,800 nine- and ten-year-old children who took part in the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Devel…

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Texas Eliminates Sales Tax On Menstrual, Baby Products

The Hill (9/1, Robertson) reported, “Texas stopped charging sales tax on menstrual and baby products starting Friday, becoming the 24th state to end a practice that women’s rights groups argue are discriminatory.” These products “were previously taxed as…

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Some 85,000 Highchairs Under Voluntary Recall Due To Fall Hazard

The New York Times (9/3, Carballo) reported, “More than 85,000 highchairs sold online and at retailers across North America are being recalled after reports of two dozen falls related to the chairs, according to” an announcement made by the US Consumer Pr…

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Social Media Trend Of Drinking Borax Is Dangerous, Experts Say

ABC News (8/31, Kindelan) reports, “Borax, a white, powdery substance, has long been a staple in many households as a cleaning agent and laundry detergent booster. Now, the substance is making the rounds on social media with some people promoting it as a…

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CDC Reports Overdose Deaths From Fake Prescription Pills Has More Than Doubled In Recent Years

NBC News (8/31, Edwards) reports, “The number of people who have overdosed and died from fake prescription pills has more than doubled in recent years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday.” The report by the CDC, “released to…

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Depression Among Children Appears Not To Have Increased Substantially Between 2004 And 2019, Systematic Review Indicates

Healio (8/31, Weldon) reports, “Depression among children did not increase substantially between 2004 and 2019, according to the” findings of a 41-study systematic review and meta-analysis published online Aug. 28 in JAMA Pediatrics.

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Data Indicate Teen HPV Vaccine Coverage Did Not Increase In 2022

Healio (8/31, Weldon) reports, “HPV vaccine coverage in U.S. teenagers did not increase in 2022 for the first time in a decade, according to data published in MMWR.” For their research, investigators “examined data on 16,043 adolescents aged between 13 an…

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As Student Mental Health Crisis Unfolds, US Schools Face Shortage Of Mental Healthcare Practitioners

According to the Washington Post (8/31, St. George), across the US, a “student mental health crisis is unfolding as the nation’s schools face a shortage of counselors, psychologists, social workers and therapists – each problem amplified by the other, and…

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FDA Warns Baby Formula Manufacturers To Correct Production Processes To Better Catch Bacterial Contamination

Reuters (8/30, Leo) reports, “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday issued warnings to three infant formula makers to correct their manufacturing processes to better catch bacterial contamination, but added it does not expect any impact on th…

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Researchers Compare Prevalence Of Severe Obesity Among US Children, Adolescents Using Extended Percentiles For BMI Vs CDC’s New Definition Of Severe Obesity

According to Healio (8/30, Weldon), research published online in Pediatrics “compared the prevalence of severe obesity among U.S. children and adolescents using the extended percentiles for BMI vs. the new definition of severe obesity” as issued by the CD…

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Glitch Results In Children Getting Wrongly Dropped From Medicaid

The AP (8/30, Lieb) reports, “Children in many states are being wrongly cut off from Medicaid because of a ‘glitch’ in the automated systems being used in a massive eligibility review for the government-run health care program, a top Medicaid official sai…

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Prenatal Exposure To SSRIs May Be Linked To Offspring Brain Development Changes, Research Finds

HCPlive (8/30, Kunzmann) reports, “Prenatal exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may be linked to changes in the development trajectories of emotional regulation in the brain among offspring, according to new research.” The findings…

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Fewer Infants With Isolated Cleft Palate Who Had Primary Surgery To Close It At Age Six Months Had Insufficient Closure Between Velum, Pharyngeal Walls Later In Childhood Than Infants Who Had Surgery At 12 Months, Trial Data Indicate

MedPage Today (8/30, Putka) reports, “Fewer infants with isolated cleft palate who had primary surgery to close it at age six months had insufficient closure between their velum and pharyngeal walls later in childhood than infants who had surgery at 12 mo…

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In Pregnancies Conceived With Infertility Treatment, Delivery At 39 Weeks’ Gestation Results In The Lowest Perinatal Risk Compared With Delivery At Subsequent Week Of Gestation, Researchers Say

Endocrinology Advisor (8/29, Kuhns) reports, “In pregnancies conceived with infertility treatment, delivery at 39 weeks’ gestation results in the lowest perinatal risk compared with delivery at subsequent week of gestation,” researchers concluded in a stu…

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COVID-19 Hospitalizations Continue To Increase In US, CDC Data Show

ABC News (8/29, Benadjaoud, Kekatos) reports, “COVID hospitalizations are continuing to increase in the United States, according to data updated Monday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” Over the past week, US hospitalizations rose “by…

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Many Models Of E-Bikes Marketed To Children, Teens Exceed Legal Speed Limits, More Closely Resemble Motor Vehicles

The New York Times (8/29, Richtel) reports, “Safety and law enforcement officials note that many models” of e-bikes “marketed to children and teenagers exceed legal speed limits and more closely resemble motor vehicles, which require” both registration an…

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Living In Neighborhoods With High Opportunity In Early Life Was Associated With Lower Childhood Asthma Incidence, Study Finds

MedPage Today (8/29, Short) reports, “Living in neighborhoods with high or very high opportunity in early life was associated with lower childhood asthma incidence compared with living in neighborhoods with low opportunity, according to a nationwide cohor…

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Not Enough Evidence Exists To Advocate For Or Against Primary Care Interventions To Prevent Child Maltreatment Before It Takes Place, USPSTF Rules

Healio (8/29, Rhoades) reports, “The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force” (USPSTF) “has ruled that there is not enough evidence to advocate for or against primary care interventions to prevent child maltreatment before it takes place,” an “I-grade recomme…

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Problems With Gut Bacteria Could Lie Behind Four Major Childhood Allergies, Study Indicates

According to The Hill (8/29, Elbein), research indicates that “problems with gut bacteria could lie behind four major – and very different – childhood allergies,” that is, “eczema, hay fever, asthma and food allergies.” For the study, investigators “follo…

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Public Health Officials Warn About Coming Wave Of COVID-19 Infections

The New York Times (8/28, Bosman) reports COVID-19 “hospitalizations have increased 24 percent in a two-week period ending Aug. 12, according to the most recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.” Additionally, “wastewater monitorin…

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Evidence On Efficacy, Safety Of Cannabis Products For Children With Cancer Is Lacking, Researchers Say

Healio (8/28, Shinkle) reports, “Despite increased interest in use of medical cannabis to alleviate cancer symptoms, there is limited rigorous evidence about the efficacy and safety of these products for pediatric patients, a systematic review and meta-an…

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Possible Biomarkers Of An Adolescent’s Risk For Developing Mental Health Conditions Include Alterations In Proteins Involved With Immune Responses, Blood Coagulation, And Other Pathways, Small Study Suggests

Healio (8/28, Cooper) reports, “Possible biomarkers of an adolescent’s risk for developing mental health issues include alterations in proteins involved with immune responses, blood coagulation and other pathways,” researchers concluded in a 91-adolescent…

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Clinical Report Provides Hearing Assessment Recommendations For Infants, Children, And Adolescents

HealthDay (8/28, Gotkine) reports, “Hearing assessment recommendations for infants, children, and adolescents are discussed in a clinical report” published online in the journal Pediatrics. The clinical report “updated recommendations for hearing assessme…

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THC Weight-Based Dose From Edible Cannabis Significant Predictor Of Severe, Prolonged Toxicity In Children Under Six Years, Researchers Conclude

MedPage Today (8/28, Henderson) reports, “The tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) dose of edible cannabis correlated to the degree of toxicity in children under six years,” according to the findings of “a retrospective review” published online in the journal Pedia…

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Social Media Having Particularly Pernicious Effect In Communities With High Rates Of Gun Violence

KFF Health News (8/25, Szabo) reported on the problem of social media’s “role in escalating gun violence.” The article interviewed a number of experts who “note that social media can have a particularly pernicious effect in communities with high rates of…

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Improved Ventilation In Schools Could Prevent Spread Of COVID-19

The New York Times (8/27, Mandavilli) reports, “Poorly ventilated spaces offer ideal transmission conditions for the coronavirus, and at the height of the pandemic, schools…were a searing point of controversy.” With outdated ventilation systems, “the pa…

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US Pharmacies Contending With Industry-Wide Shortage Of Amoxicillin

CBS News (8/25, Cerullo) reported, “Pharmacies across the U.S. are contending with an industry-wide shortage of the amoxicillin drug, commonly prescribed to treat a variety of childhood infections, including ailments like ear infections, strep throat and…

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Administering Extended Half-Life RSV Antibodies In Newborn Nursery May Minimize Access Disparities, Ensure Optimal Uptake, Research Suggests

The American Journal of Managed Care (8/25, Bonavitacola) reported, “Administering extended half-life respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) antibodies in the newborn nursery would minimize access disparities and ensure optimal uptake,” investigators concluded…

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More States Expanding Free School Meals Programs

According to the AP (8/26, Karnowski, Bryan), Minnesota, New Mexico, Colorado, Vermont, Michigan, and Massachusetts plan to make “school breakfasts and lunches permanently free to all students starting this academic year, regardless of family income, foll…

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Elevations Of IL-17A Cytokines Uniquely Characteristic Of Kawasaki Disease In Children Vs Other Inflammatory Disorders With Similar Presentations, Researchers Suggest

MedPage Today (8/25, Gever) reported, “Elevations in a single cytokine species were uniquely characteristic of Kawasaki disease in children versus other inflammatory disorders with similar presentations, researchers said” in findings published online in t…

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Uptick In COVID-19 Leads Some Entities To Reinstate Mask Mandates

The Hill (8/24, Choi) reports, “The recent upturn in COVID-19 cases in some regions has spurred a handful of entities around the country to reinstate mask mandates, reigniting the debate over what place masking requirements have in an era of living with t…

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Three US Counties Account For Nine Percent Of Excess Black Infant Deaths, HRSA Scientist Says

KFF Health News (8/24, West) reports, “Black women are less likely than women from other racial groups to carry a pregnancy to term – and in Harris County,” TX, “when they do, their infants are about twice as likely to die before their first birthday as t…

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Emollient Bathing Of Two-Month-Old Infants Tied To Increased Risk Of Developing Atopic Dermatitis By Age Two Years, Researchers Say

Dermatology Advisor (8/24, Goldberg) reports, “Emollient bathing of two-month-old infants was found to be associated with an increased risk of developing of atopic dermatitis…by two years of age, according to” findings published online in the journal Pe…

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Birth Weight May Be Associated With Risk Of Certain Pediatric Cancers, Research Finds

Cancer Therapy Advisor (8/24, Lawrence) reports, “Birth weight may be associated with the risk of certain pediatric cancers, according to a study.” Investigators “found associations between high birth weight (being large for gestational age) and an increa…

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For First Time Since 2013, Rate At Which American Adolescents Receive HPV Vaccine Has Not Increased

HealthDay (8/24, Mundell) reports, “For the first time in a decade, the rate at which American adolescents received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has not increased,” according to findings published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Repo…

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FDA Warns Six Companies Over Selling Unapproved Products Marketed As Treatments For Molluscum Contagiosum

The Hill (8/23, Sforza) reports that the FDA “has warned six companies…over selling unapproved products marketed as treatments for a skin condition affecting children.” The agency’s “Center for Drug Evaluation and Research sent the six companies — Amazo…

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Study Links Sitting Time In Childhood With Heart Damage In Young Adulthood

HealthDay (8/23, Murez) reports, “Children need to get up off the sofa and move more, according to” findings presented at the European Society of Cardiology meeting “that linked childhood sitting time with heart damage in young adulthood,” even “when the…

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Study Finds Age An Important Factor To Consider When Assessing Children For COVID-19 Severity

Healio (8/23, Weldon) reports, “A study of more than 30,000 hospitalized children with SARS-CoV-2 infection found that ICU admissions for COVID-19 decreased over the course of the pandemic but ventilatory and oxygen support for the youngest children did n…

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CPSC Staffers Recommend First Federal Requirements Intended To Make Nursing Pillows Safer

According to NBC News (8/23, Khimm, Chuck), on Aug. 23, Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) staff “recommended the first federal requirements” (PDF) “intended to make nursing pillows safer and discourage caregivers from setting babies down on the pi…

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Children, Teens Who Receive Social Media Counseling From Trained PCPs Report Reductions In Unsafe Social Media Behaviors, Greater Communication With Parents, Researchers Say

Healio (8/23, Rhoades) reports, “Children and adolescents who received social media counseling from trained primary care physicians” (PCPs) “reported reductions in unsafe social media behaviors and greater communication with parents,” according to finding…

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Secondhand Smoke Appears To Be A Source Of Lead Exposure In Children, Researchers Say

According to HealthDay (8/23, Murez), “one source of lead exposure in children” appears to be “secondhand smoke,” according to the findings of a greater than 2,800-child study that “looked at levels of lead and a metabolite of nicotine known as cotinine,”…

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About One In Five Women Were Mistreated While Receiving Maternity Care, Survey Study Reveals

The New York Times (8/22, Rabin) reports, “One in five women in the United States said they had been mistreated while receiving maternity care, and almost one in three said they had experienced discrimination because of factors like age, weight or income,…

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Some Medical Experts Concerned About Egg-Cracking TikTok Trend

NBC News (8/22, Rosenblatt) reports, “A viral prank in which parents film themselves cracking an egg on their toddlers’ heads is taking over TikTok.” However, “some medical experts say the laughs may not be worth the potential harmful effects the stunt co…

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Infants With Cystic Fibrosis Who Received Care At 47 Days Old Had Decreased Weight, Height-For-Age During Infancy Compared With Care At 10 Days Old, Study Finds

Healio (8/22, Hornick) reports, “Infants with cystic fibrosis who received care at 47 days old had decreased weight and height-for-age during infancy compared with infants who received care at 10 days old, according to” a study. The findings were publishe…

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Experts Stress Importance Of Sunscreen Use As Children Return To School

ABC News (8/23, Mehta) reports, “While most parents remember to slather their kids with sunscreen at the beach, they might forget to add it to their school backpacks.” However, “according to experts, sunscreen is just as essential during the school year,…

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Adhering To Certain Lifestyle Interventions, Including Diets, Tied To Improved Outcomes For Mothers And Their Children, Studies Indicate

MedPage Today (8/22, Robertson) reports, “Adhering to certain lifestyle interventions, including diets like the Mediterranean diet and American Heart Association (AHA) diet, were linked to improved outcomes for mothers and their children,” investigators c…

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Device Overuse, Screen Time Top Parental Concerns About Children’s Health, Poll Data Reveal

Healio (8/21, Weldon) reports, “Device overuse and screen time topped a poll of parental concerns about children’s health, followed by concerns about internet safety and mental health, according to results released” Aug. 21 in the “annual University of Mi…

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FDA Approves Maternal RSV Vaccine Designed To Protect Infants

Reuters (8/21, Wingrove, Satija) reports, “The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved Pfizer’s respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccine for use in women during the middle of the third trimester of pregnancy to protect their babies.” The go-…

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Guns Now Leading Cause Of Death Among US Children, Researchers Say

The Hill (8/21, Sforza) reports, “A record number of U.S. children were killed by firearms in 2021,” researchers concluded in findings published online in the journal Pediatrics. HealthDay (8/21, Mann) reports, “Guns are now the leading cause of death amo…

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Benefits Of Gestational Exposure To Vitamin D For Respiratory Health In Children Is Characterized By Specific Alterations To Mother’s Metabolism, Study Finds

Healio (8/21, Gawel) reports, “The benefits of gestational exposure to vitamin D for respiratory health in children is characterized by specific alterations to the mother’s metabolism, according to a study.” The “protective effects were associated with a…

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Teaching Children How To Label Food May Trigger Eating Disorders, Research Suggests

According to the Washington Post (8/21, Tenore Tarpley), “it’s still commonplace for schools to teach kids how to label food, even though research has shown that exercises like these can trigger eating disorders.” In fact, “a chart review of young patient…

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Federal Judge Blocks Georgia From Enforcing Law Banning Physicians From Starting Hormone Therapy For Transgender Youth

The AP (8/21, Thanawala) reports, “A federal judge has blocked the state of Georgia from enforcing part of a new law that bans” physicians “from starting hormone therapy for transgender people under the age of 18.” In her ruling Sunday, US District Court…

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More Screen Time Associated With Delayed Development In Very Young Children, Study Indicates

The New York Times (8/21, Richtel) reports, “One-year-olds exposed to more than four hours of screen time a day experienced developmental delays in communication and problem-solving skills at ages two and four, according to” findings published online in J…

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WHO, US CDC Tracking New BA.2.86 Variant Of COVID-19

Reuters (8/18, Beasley) reported the “U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday that it was tracking a new, highly mutated lineage of the virus that causes COVID-19.” The strain “is named BA.2.86, and has been detected in the United…

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Pediatric Asthma Decreased In UK, While Exacerbation Rates Increased, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (8/18, Stong) reported, “While the incidence and prevalence of pediatric asthma decreased from 2008 to 2018 in the United Kingdom (UK), especially among younger age groups, pediatric asthma exacerbations increased, according to study f…

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Receiving COVID-19 Booster During Pregnancy Improves Immune Response For Mothers, Infants At Delivery, Study Finds

The American Journal of Managed Care (8/18, Munz) reported, “According to a recent study published in Vaccine, getting the COVID-19 booster shot on top of the initial mRNA vaccine leads to a dramatic increase in antibodies – for mothers and infants – at t…

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Undergoing Adenotonsillectomy May Improve Dysphagia Outcomes In Children With OSA And Tonsil Hypertrophy Compared With Watchful Waiting With Supportive Care, Study Finds

MedPage Today (8/20, Short) reports, “Undergoing adenotonsillectomy may improve dysphagia outcomes in children with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and tonsil hypertrophy compared with watchful waiting with supportive care (WWSC), a secondary analysis of th…

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Probability Of Receiving Vision Test From Primary Care Physician Appears Low In Youth, May Vary By Insurance Status, Researchers Say

Healio (8/18, Rhoades) reported, “Despite guidelines recommending yearly testing, the probability of receiving a vision test from a primary care physician was low in youth and varied by insurance status,” investigators concluded in the findings of a 89,93…

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New Vaccines For COVID-19, RSV Rolling Out This Fall

The Washington Post (8/17, Nirappil, Sun) reports, “Health officials are unveiling a new arsenal of vaccines to protect vulnerable Americans and exhausted health-care workers from an expected wave of [COVID-19], flu and RSV as the fall respiratory virus s…

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EDs Treated More Than 2K Pediatric Injuries Caused By Ceiling Fans During Recent Nine-Year Period, Study Finds

Healio (8/17) reports, “Emergency departments in the United States treated more than 2,000 pediatric injuries caused by ceiling fans per year during a recent 9-year period, according to a study, which determined that the injuries were uncommon but prevent…

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New Monoclonal Antibody Could Limit RSV Infections Among Babies This Year

CNN (8/17, Christensen) reports, “This year, experts think the timing of the RSV season will be closer to the pre-pandemic normal, but case numbers will probably be anything but – that is, if people embrace newly available tools to prevent RSV.” New treat…

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Pandemic Tied To Greater Increases In BMI Over Time In 10- To 12-Year-Olds, Study Finds

HealthDay (8/17, Solomon) reports, “There were significantly greater increases in body mass index (BMI) over time in 10- to 12-year-old youth during the COVID-19 pandemic versus before the pandemic, according to a research letter.” The findings were publi…

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Vaping CBD Increasing Among Middle, High School Students, Survey Shows

HealthDay (8/17, Collins) reports, “Vaping CBD (cannabidiol) is on the rise among middle and high school students, according to a national U.S. survey, and health experts warn there can be serious risks involved.” Results from the 2022 National Youth Toba…

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FDA Approves Palovarotene For Adults, Children With Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva

Reuters (8/16, Satija, Roy) reports the FDA “on Wednesday approved French drugmaker Ipsen’s drug for a rare bone disorder, making it the first treatment available to patients with the condition that causes abnormal bone growth.” Ipsen “said its drug, Soho…

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Waning Immunity To RSV Due To COVID-19-Pandemic May Have Resulted In Unique Pediatric RSV Transmission Pattern In The Netherlands, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (8/16, Stong) reports, “Waning immunity to the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) due to the COVID-19-pandemic may have resulted in a unique pediatric RSV transmission pattern in the Netherlands, where an initial summer 2021 pediatric R…

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Children Exposed To Physical Assault Appear At Higher Risk Of A Mental Illness Diagnosis Over Subsequent Years, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (8/16, Firth) reports, “Children exposed to physical assault were at higher risk of a mental illness diagnosis over subsequent years, with the greatest risk seen in the year after the assault,” investigators concluded in a study that “includ…

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Research Suggests Links Between Fracking And Asthma Reactions, Lymphoma In Children

The AP (8/16, Levy) reports, “Children who lived closer to natural gas wells in heavily drilled western Pennsylvania were more likely to develop a relatively rare form of cancer, and nearby residents of all ages had an increased chance of severe asthma re…

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Brains Of Teens Who Take Up Smoking Appear Different From Those Of Adolescents Who Do Not Take Up The Habit, Imaging Study Finds

CBS News (8/16, Lyons) reports a study published online Aug. 15 in the journal Nature Communications “suggests that the brains of teenagers who take up smoking may be different from those of adolescents who don’t take up the habit – data that could help t…

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COVID-19 Hospitalizations Continuing To Increase In US, CDC Says

ABC News (8/15, Benadjaoud, Kekatos) reports, “COVID-19 hospitalizations are continuing to increase in the United States, according to the” CDC. Data show that “for the week ending Aug. 5, COVID hospitalizations increased 14.3% from 9,026 to 10,320 weekly…

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ARRIVE Trial Publication Associated With Increased Labor Induction Rates, Reduced Cesarean Births, Research Letter Says

Healio (8/15, Welsh) reports that publication of the ARRIVE study, a randomized trial of “labor induction vs. expectant management in births,” was “linked to a rise in 39-week labor induction rates and a decrease in cesarean birth rates among low-risk nul…

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Families Struggling To Find AD/HD Medication As Shortages Add Up

The New York Times (8/15, Caron) reports, “In July, the Food and Drug Administration posted more shortages in” medications for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), and this month, the agency “and the Drug Enforcement Administ…

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IV Magnesium Sulfate Prior To Preterm Birth At 30 To 34 Weeks’ Gestation Fails To Improve Survival, Incidence Of Cerebral Palsy Among Infants Up To Two Years Post-Delivery, Research Suggests

MedPage Today (8/15, Henderson) reports, “The use of intravenous magnesium sulfate prior to preterm birth at 30 to 34 weeks’ gestation failed to improve survival and incidence of cerebral palsy among infants up to two years post-delivery,” investigators c…

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Peer Victimization, Suicidality Tied To Higher Headache Frequency In Adolescents, Researchers Conclude

Healio (8/15, Herpen) reports, “Peer victimization and suicidality were associated with higher headache frequency in adolescents, while the association between headache and gender diversity weakened after controlling for other factors,” investigators conc…

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Majority Of Babies Who Ended Up In ICU With RSV In Late 2022 Were Previously Healthy, Study Indicates

According to NBC News (8/15, Tamkins), “the majority of babies who ended up in the intensive care unit with” respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) “in late 2022 were full term and previously healthy,” according to findings published online in JAMA Network Ope…

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Demand For Nurse Practitioners Exceeds Other Specialty Providers, Report Says

Healthcare Dive (8/14, Vogel) reports, “AMN Healthcare, a healthcare staffing company, fielded more searches for nurse practitioners, physician assistants and certified registered nurse anesthetists than for primary care physicians over the past year as p…

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National Shortage Of Amoxicillin Led To An Increase In Use Of Alternative Agents To Treat Ear Infections, Researchers Say

Healio (8/14, Weldon) reports, “A national shortage of amoxicillin led to an increase in the use of alternative agents to treat ear infections,” investigators concluded in the findings of a research brief published online in Pediatrics. After the October…

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Health Of Latino Children Worse In States With Harsher Laws That Apply To Immigrants And Systemic Prejudice Against Them, Study Finds

CNN (8/15, Bracho-Sanchez) reports, “Latino children who live in states with harsher laws that apply to immigrants and systemic prejudice against them are more likely to experience mental health or chronic physical health conditions, according to a new st…

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PARS Remains Effective Tool For Estimating Asthma Risk When Used For Patients Of Varying Backgrounds, Research Suggests

MedPage Today (8/14, Short) reports, “The Pediatric Asthma Risk Score (PARS) remained an effective tool for estimating asthma risk when used for patients of varying backgrounds, a study of 10 cohorts” revealed. Included in those 10 cohorts were 5,634 pati…

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Social Media Appears To Be Tied With Fewer Mental Health Issues Among Transgender, Nonbinary Youth, Study Indicates

Healio (8/14, Bascom) reports, “Social media appeared to be associated with fewer mental health issues among transgender and nonbinary youth,” researchers concluded in findings published online in JAMA Network Open. The study “included 1,231 people aged 1…

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PPIs Strongly Linked With Serious Infection Risk Among Infants, Young Children In Large Study

MedPage Today (8/14, Minerd) reports, “Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) were strongly linked with serious infection risk among infants and young children in a large national study, suggesting caution in prescribing” them, according to findings published onli…

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Patients, Healthcare Workers In US Signal Preference For In-Person Care, Survey Finds

mHealth Intelligence (8/11, Vaidya) reported, “Despite the boom in telehealth use during the COVID-19 pandemic, Americans and healthcare workers largely agree that in-person care is higher quality, more efficient, and more affordable than virtual care, a…

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Health Systems Opt For Long-Term Strategies To Mitigate Workforce Shortages

According to an annual hospital systems survey by Modern Healthcare (8/11, Kacik, Subscription Publication), health systems are prioritizing long-term strategies to combat persistent workforce shortages and decrease reliance on staffing agencies. Focusing…

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Gas Stove Use Was Associated With New-Onset Or Persistent Asthma Among Children, Adolescents In Puerto Rico, Study Finds

Healio (8/11, Gawel) reported, “Persistent use of gas stoves was associated with new-onset or persistent asthma among children and adolescents in Puerto Rico, according to a study.” The “association was independent of secondhand smoke, proximity to a road…

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Healthcare Sector Incurs Highest Data Breach Costs, Report Says

Healthcare IT News (8/11, Fox) reported, “New research by the Ponemon Institute and IBM Security revealed that the global average cost of a data breach reached $4.45 million and the costs of avoiding law enforcement after a ransomware attack have increase…

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HHS Announces Awards Of Over $88 Million To Develop School-Based Mental Health Programs

According to Bloomberg Law (8/11, Subscription Publication), HHS “has awarded over $88 million to grant programs to develop school-based mental health programs and to increase access to substance use disorder treatments,” the department announced on Aug….

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Health Officials Prepare For Rise In Respiratory Illnesses, Encourage Vaccinations

CNN (8/10, Howard) reports, “State and local health officials across the United States are bracing for a rise in respiratory illnesses this fall, and they are making plans to urge everyone who is eligible to get vaccinated against COVID-19, flu and respir…

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High Gut Microbiota Diversity Before Allo-HSCT Was Associated With Better Survival Outcomes In Children, Study Finds

MedPage Today (8/10, Bassett) reports, “High gut microbiota diversity before allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) was associated with significantly better survival outcomes in children, according to a multicenter study.” In the “…

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FDA Approves Somatrogon-ghla For Children Three And Older With Growth Hormone Deficiency

Healio (8/10, Rollet) reports the FDA has approved “a once-weekly human growth hormone analog for children aged 3 years and older with growth hormone deficiency, according to” a drugmaker press release. Regulators approved somatrogon-ghla based on phase 3…

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Advocates Urge Mandatory Inclusion Of Sensor Technology To Prevent Child Deaths In Hot Cars

The New York Times (8/10, Levenson) reports that an average of 40 children per year die in the United States from heatstroke after being left unattended in cars, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Child-accessible car sensor…

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Administration Unveils New Online Tracking Tool For Heat-Related Illnesses

The Hill (8/9, Weixel) reports, “The Biden Administration on Wednesday launched a new information system to map emergency medical services responses to heat-related illness across the country.” The new “online dashboard is run by the Department of Health…

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New COVID-19 Vaccines To Be Available By End Of September

CBS News (8/9, Tin) reports, “The first new COVID-19 vaccines updated for this fall season are now expected to be available by the end of September, once both the Food and Drug Administration and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sign off on…

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Variant EG.5 Causing 17% Of New COVID-19 Cases In US, CDC Data Show

CNN (8/9, Goodman) reports, “Nationally, EG.5 is causing about 17% of new COVID-19 cases in the country, compared with 16% for the next most common lineage, XBB.1.16, according to the latest estimates from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention…

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Nurse Home-Visit Program Shows No Benefit For Prenatal Care Uptake, Trial Suggests

MedPage Today (8/9, Firth) reports, “Sending registered nurses out on home visits throughout pregnancy failed to move the needle when it came to improving uptake of prenatal care, a randomized trial involving Medicaid patients found.” The findings were pu…

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Children With Asthma Had Similar Reductions In Exacerbations With Omalizumab Regardless Of Race, Study Finds

Healio (8/9, Gawel) reports, “Children with asthma aged 6 years to younger than 12 years had similar reductions in exacerbations with omalizumab regardless of race, according to a study.” The findings were published in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical…

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Newborns Requiring Methadone After Bowel Infection Surgery Tend To Require Longer Hospital Stays, Research Suggests

HealthDay (8/9, Murez) reports, “About 1 in 5 newborns hospitalized for surgery to treat a life-threatening bowel infection are given opioids for pain relief and some then need methadone to wean off the addictive drugs.” However, “there is wide variabilit…

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COVID-19 Hospitalizations In US Rising, But Only Slightly, Data Show

The AP (8/8, Johnson, Neergaard, Stobbe) reports, “COVID-19 hospital admissions have inched upward in the United States since early July in a small-scale echo of the three previous summers.” During “the week ending July 29, COVID-19 hospital admissions we…

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HRQOL More Strongly Associated With Sleep Quality Vs OSA In Children With Obesity, Research Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (8/8, Stong) reports, “Among children with obesity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) was more strongly associated with subjective sleep quality compared with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), researchers” found. The research was pub…

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FDA Reminds Caregivers To Store E-Cigarette Cartridges Safely To Prevent Children From Exposure

The New York Times (8/8, Pearson) reports that the FDA “is reminding caregivers to store tobacco vaping cartridges safely to prevent children from being poisoned by the liquid inside, noting that e-cigarette exposures have increased sharply over the last…

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Infants With Food Allergy Have Greater Risk For Deficits In Lung Function And For Asthma At Age 6, Study Finds

Healio (8/8, Gawel) reports, “Infants with a food allergy experience a greater risk for deficits in lung function and for asthma at age 6 years, according to a study.” The findings were published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

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Pregnant Workers Could Receive New Protections Under Proposed Rules For Pregnant Workers Fairness Act

The Washington Post (8/8, Bogage) reports, “Pregnant workers or those who recently gave birth would be entitled to new on-the-job accommodations – including longer, more frequent breaks, schedule changes, teleworking privileges and temporary job restructu…

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COVID-19 Transmission Rate Low In Schools, Study Indicates

Healio (8/8, Weldon) reports, “A study of SARS-CoV-2 transmission in 10 Massachusetts school districts found that the secondary attack rate of SARS-CoV-2 among school contacts was low – between 2% and 3% – and that masking reduced the odds of transmission…

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COVID-19 Variant EG.5 Now Dominant, CDC Says

CBS News (8/7, Tin) reports, “The EG.5 variant now makes up the largest proportion of new COVID-19 infections nationwide, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated, as multiple parts of the country have been reporting their first upticks of…

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Biologic Therapies For Severe Asthma In Pediatric Patients Are Safe, Effective In Improving QOL, Other Related Measures, Research Finds

HCPlive (8/7, Smith) reports, “Biologic therapies for severe asthma in pediatric patients are safe and effective in improving quality of life and other related measures, according to recent findings evaluated through newly-developed standardized core outc…

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Genetic Disorders, CCHD Associated With Mortality In Pediatric Patients With Pulmonary Vein Stenosis, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (8/7, Stong) reports, “Among pediatric patients with postoperative pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS), mortality is associated with complex congenital heart disease (CCHD), single ventricle physiology, and a genetic disorder, according to a…

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At Least 162 Infant Deaths Linked To Nursing Pillows Since 2007, Analysis Finds

NBC News (8/7, Khimm, Chuck, Martin) reports, “At least 162 babies under a year old have died in incidents involving nursing pillows since 2007, according to a first-of-its-kind analysis based on hundreds of public records as well as internal federal data…

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In Small Study, tRNS Appears To Help Ease Symptoms Of AD/HD In Children Without Side Effects Caused By Stimulation Medications

According to HealthDay (8/7, Mann), transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) “may help ease the symptoms of” attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD) “in children without some of the side effects stimulant medications can cause,” according to…

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Program Promoting Water Drinking In Elementary Schools Prevents Increases In Prevalence Of Students With Overweight, Study Finds

Healio (8/7, Weldon) reports “a program to promote water drinking in elementary schools prevented increases in the prevalence of students with overweight, a study published in Pediatrics found.” Researchers “cluster-randomized 1,249 students from 18 low-i…

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Over 90% Of Children In Ohio Measles Outbreak Unvaccinated, Report Says

The Hill (8/4, Nazzaro) wrote a report “from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that more than 90 percent of the children infected in last year’s measles outbreak in Ohio were unvaccinated.” The report “looked at the 85 total confirmed c…

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Steroids Prescribed To Pregnant Women At Risk Of Preterm Birth May Have Health Downsides For Infants, Review Suggests

HealthDay (8/4, Thompson) reported, “Steroids are often unnecessarily prescribed to pregnant women thought to be at risk of preterm birth,” an evidence review contends. For this reason, “millions of babies are needlessly exposed to long-term health proble…

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As Pandemic Recedes, Many Summer Camps For Children Are Adding Mental Health Support

The New York Times (8/6, Barry, Newman) reports, “As the pandemic recedes, many” summer camps for children “are adding mental supports.” For example, “some have care teams that meet regularly to discuss interpersonal dynamics among bunkmates,” while “many…

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Researchers Monitor Neurodevelopment Following Prenatal Exposure To Newer Epilepsy Drugs

MedPage Today (8/4, Lewis) reported, “Children with fetal exposure to newer antiseizure medications showed no difference in neurodevelopmental outcomes at age 3 compared with unexposed children, data from the ongoing MONEAD study showed.” The findings of…

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Many Babies In US To Be Eligible For RSV Prevention Shot This Fall

NPR (8/5, Huang) reported that for the first time, “many babies in the U.S. will be eligible to get a shot to fend off RSV” this fall. On Thursday, the CDC “recommended that all infants under 8 months old receive an injection of nirsevimab, a newly approv…

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Black Parents, Their Children More Likely To Experience Unfair Treatment When Seeking Medical Care, Study Suggests

CNN (8/3, Gamble) reports, “Black parents and their children are more likely to experience unfair treatment when seeking medical care than others, a new study from the Urban Institute found.” This “study…is based on data from the nonprofit’s Health Refo…

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Serum Copeptin, Urinary AQP2 Lower In Children With Nocturnal Enuresis, Research Suggests

HealthDay (8/3, Gotkine) reports, “Serum copeptin and urinary aquaporin-2 levels are significantly lower in children with primary monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis, according to a study.” The findings were published in the International Journal of Urolog…

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Physicians Raise Alarm On Rising Trend Of Child Nicotine Poisonings From E-Cigarettes

Kaiser Health News (8/3, Szabo) reports that physicians are seeing an increase in children suffering serious health issues due to liquid nicotine poisoning from e-cigarettes. Despite a 2016 law requiring child-resistant packaging, many e-cigarettes still…

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COVID-19 Pandemic May Have Contributed To Rise In Precocious Puberty Among Girls, Research Suggests

HealthDay (8/3, Murez) reports, “More girls started puberty before age 8 during the COVID-19 pandemic, a phenomenon called precocious puberty, researchers say.” Possible “reasons include potential risk factors such as increased screen time and less exerci…

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Adverse Childhood Experiences May Contribute To Issues With Daily Tasks In Older Age, Analysis Finds

STAT (8/3, Castillo, Subscription Publication) reports “stressful experiences during childhood could have more far-reaching effects than previously thought, contributing to issues with daily tasks like getting dressed or preparing meals in older age, acco…

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CDC Advisory Panel Recommends Use Of Nirsevimab To Prevent RSV In Infants, Toddlers

Reuters (8/3, Dey, Sunny) reports the CDC “said its advisory panel on Thursday recommended use of Sanofi and partner AstraZeneca’s antibody therapy to prevent respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in infants and toddlers.” The Advisory Committee on Immunizati…

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Preterm Birth Appears To Be Risk Factor For Developing Asthma, COPD In Adulthood, Research Suggests

Pulmonology Advisor (8/2, Goldberg) reports, “Preterm birth is a risk factor for having chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma as an adult, according to study findings.” The results of the population-based register study were published in the Eur…

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Multifocal Disease Is Not Linked To Higher Risk Of Recurrence Or Mortality For Children, Adolescents With Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma, Study Finds

Healio (8/2, Monostra) reports, “Multifocal disease is not linked to a greater risk of recurrence or mortality for children and adolescents with papillary thyroid carcinoma, according to a” single-center study. Investigators found that “children with papi…

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Food Allergy In Infancy, Even When Transient, Tied To Later Lung Function Deficits, Research Suggests

HealthDay (8/2, Solomon) reports, “Food allergy in infancy, whether it resolves or not, is associated with lung function deficits and asthma at age 6 years, according to a study.” The findings were published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health.

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SARS-CoV-2 Infection Does Not Precipitate T1D Diagnosis In Children, Study Suggests

MedPage Today (8/2, Monaco) reports SARS-CoV-2 “infection didn’t appear to precipitate a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in kids, a prospective multinational cohort study suggested.” In the study, “researchers tested more than 4,500 adolescents every few mon…

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One In Six US Toddlers Did Not Complete Childhood Vaccination Series In 2019, Study Finds

Healio (8/2, Weldon) reports “one in six toddlers in the United States did not complete the vaccination series for seven recommended childhood vaccines in 2019, the year before the COVID-19 pandemic, according to a study published in Pediatrics.” Out “of…

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Researchers Use EHR Systems To Identify Allergy Patterns Among Children Across US

HealthDay (8/1, Gotkine) reports researchers in a study examined EHR data to describe “pediatric allergy patterns across the United States.” Researchers “found that the allergic disease cumulative incidence was 10.3%, 4.0%, 20.1%, 19.7%, and 0.11% for ato…

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Many Parents Remain Anxious About Exposing Infants To Peanuts Between Four And Six Months Of Age To Prevent Peanut Allergies, Researchers Say

The Washington Post (8/1, Camero) reports, “Exposing infants to peanuts between four and six months of age can potentially prevent peanut allergies, yet many parents remain anxious about the prospect and aren’t aware that it’s safe,” according to findings…

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Study Reveals Seven Potential Genes Predicted To Increase Risk Of Autism

According to HealthDay (8/1, Murez), after performing “whole genome sequencing in more than 4,550 people from just over 1,000 families with at least two children diagnosed with autism,” a group that “included more than 1,800 children with autism and more…

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Most Areas Of The US Lack Facilities Offering Medically Managed Opioid Withdrawal For Patients Under 18, Researchers Say

According to KFF Health News (8/1), teenagers who end up in emergency departments with “an opioid overdose generally receive naloxone to reverse the effects of dangerous drugs in their system and are sent home with a list of places they can go for follow-…

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Exposure To Lead In Utero Or In Early Childhood May Be Tied To Increased Risk Of Engaging In Criminal Behavior In Adulthood, Systematic Review Indicates

Nexstar (8/1, Udasin) reports, “Exposure to lead in the womb or in early childhood may be connected to an increased risk of engaging in criminal behavior in adulthood,” according to the findings of a systematic review published online in PLOS Global Publi…

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Exposure To Cold Outdoor Air Helps Improve Croup Symptoms In Children, Research Suggests

MedPage Today (8/1, Henderson) reports, “For children with croup, adding cold outdoor air to mainstay treatment proved beneficial for reducing the intensity of symptoms, especially in moderate cases, a randomized controlled trial showed.” Results show tha…

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Efficacy, Safety Outcomes In Adolescents Treated With Ritlecitinib For Severe Alopecia Areata Appear Consistent With Adults In The Same Indication, Phase 2b/3 Study Data Reveal

Healio (7/31, Capaldo) reports, “Efficacy and safety outcomes in adolescents treated with ritlecitinib for severe alopecia areata were consistent with adults in the same indication, according to a subgroup analysis of” the phase 2b/3 ALLEGRO study that “e…

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Study Finds Children With Leukemia With IKZF₁ Deletion Benefit From Prolonged Maintenance Therapy

HealthDay (7/31, Gotkine) reports, “For children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), cases with IKZF₁ deletion (IKZF₁del) benefit from prolonged maintenance therapy, according to a study.” The findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncolo…

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Many Parents Do Not Know Steps That Can Be Taken To Lower Risk Of Child Developing Peanut Allergy, Report Says

USA Today (7/31, Rodriguez) reports “many parents don’t know the steps they can take to reduce the risk of their child developing a peanut allergy, five years after new prevention guidelines emerged, according to a new report.” In 2017, NIH “recommended p…

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Breastfeeding Associated With Reduced Risk For Postperinatal Infant Death, Research Suggests

HealthDay (7/31, Gotkine) reports, “Breastfeeding is associated with a reduction in postperinatal infant death during the first year of life, according to a study.” The findings were published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

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Federal Appeals Court Decides To Let Kentucky Enforce Ban On Gender-Affirming Care For Minors During Litigation

The AP (7/31, Barakat) reports, “A federal appeals court is allowing Kentucky to enforce a recently enacted ban on gender-affirming care for young transgender people while the issue is being litigated.” The judges’ 2-1 decision on “Monday from the Sixth U…

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Children With Multiple Comorbidities At Increased Risk For Severe Outcomes After COVID-19 Infection, Research Suggests

Healio (7/31, Weldon) reports, “A large study in the United Kingdom revealed some ‘epidemiologic nuances’ of COVID-19 in children, experts said.” The researchers “found that the risk for severe COVID-19 among children remained low throughout the first 2 y…

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CDC Director Says Agency Likely Will Release Guidance Recommending Annual COVID-19 Booster Shots

Fox News (7/28, Musto) reported CDC Director Mandy Cohen “said Thursday that her agency would likely come out with guidance in the fall that Americans should get an annual COVID-19 booster shot.” Cohen said, “We’re just on the precipice of that, so I don’…

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Some Signs Of Mild COVID-19 Wave In Late Summer, Experts Say

CNN (7/28, Goodman, McPhillips) reported, “Many signs are pointing to a Covid-19 summer surge – although one that’s far less intense than what emerged the past few summers.” Health “experts say they do not expect that cases will be severe or that the upti…

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Too Little Fiber During Pregnancy May Slow Mental Development In Babies, Research Finds

HealthDay (7/28, Reinberg) reported that “too little fiber in Mom’s diet during pregnancy may slow a baby’s mental development, Japanese research suggests.” Research on animals has “found that a low-fiber diet during pregnancy slows brain nerve function i…

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Experts Offer Tips On Protecting Children From Extreme Heat While Playing Outside

NPR (7/28, Chappell, Godoy) reported “extreme heat poses health risks to everyone – and it’s a unique challenge for kids who love to be outdoors in summertime.” Small kids “can be especially at risk in the heat, but experts say they can still play safely…

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Concern Growing Over Teens’ E-Bike Safety Amid Regulatory Gaps

The New York Times (7/29, Richtel) reported on the growing concern over the safety of e-bikes, especially in the hands of teenagers. The e-bike industry is booming, yet existing laws and regulations have not kept pace with the technological advancements,…

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FDA Issues Warnings To Three Companies For Distributing E-Cigarette Products That Appeal To Minors

CNN (7/27, Musa) reports that the FDA “issued warning letters Thursday to several distributors of e-cigarettes for selling and distributing unauthorized e-cigarette products that appeal to minors.” The FDA “says the companies – ABS Distribution, EC Supply…

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In 2022, Gun Suicides In The US Reached An All-Time High, Data Indicate

USA Today (7/27, Hauck) reports, “Gun suicides reached an all-time high in the United States in 2022, and the gun suicide rate among Black teens surpassed that of white teens for the first time on record,” according to “newly-released provisional data fro…

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Children With Cogan’s Syndrome Should Undergo Thorough Evaluations Upon Presentation, Researchers Say

Healio (7/27, Martin) reports, “Children with Cogan’s syndrome should undergo thorough evaluations upon presentation, including screenings for autoimmune and infectious diseases, as well as echocardiography and brain MRI,” investigators concluded in the f…

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Better Reimbursement Could Have Major Impact On Rate Of HPV Vaccine In US Adolescents, Research Indicates

HCPlive (7/27, Campbell) reports, “An analysis of vaccination reimbursement trends suggests improved reimbursement could have a substantial impact on the rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in US adolescents.” Analysis results “indicate reimburseme…

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Poor Mental, Social Health Linked To Worse Asthma Outcomes In Children, Study Finds

Healio (7/27, Gawel) reports, “Children with poor measures of mental and social health also experienced poor respiratory outcomes following intensive care use for asthma, according to a study.” The findings were published in The Journal of Allergy and Cli…

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Low Maternal Fiber Intake During Pregnancy Tied To Increased Risk For Neurodevelopmental Delay In Offspring, Research Suggests

HealthDay (7/27, Gotkine) reports, “Lower maternal fiber intake during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for neurodevelopmental delay in offspring,” investigators concluded in a study that used “data from 76,207 mother-infant pairs” and admin…

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Daily Soft Drink Consumption Positively Associated With Prevalence Of Overweight, Obesity In Adolescent Students, Research Suggests

HCPlive (7/27, Iapoce) reports, “The prevalence of daily soft drink consumption had a statistically significant positive association with the prevalence of overweight and obesity in adolescent-aged students,” investigators concluded in findings published…

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AWS Rolling Out Generative AI Tool Focused On Clinical Documentation

Modern Healthcare (7/26, Turner, Subscription Publication) reports Amazon Web Services “is launching a generative artificial intelligence tool focused on clinical documentation.” AWS HealthScribe is going to “allow healthcare software providers to more ea…

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COVID-19 Wastewater Data Eventually Ceased Being In Sync With Infection, Hospitalization Rates, Research Indicates

The New York Times (7/26, Anthes) reports, “Early last year, as the United States grappled with a record Covid-19 surge, the levels of coronavirus in a community’s wastewater were closely aligned with two other statistics that measured the toll of virus:…

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County-Level Preterm Birth Risk Appears High For Women With More Social Determinants Of Health As Measured By Maternal Vulnerability Index, Study Indicates

Healio (7/26, Welsh) reports, “County-level preterm birth risk was higher among women with more physical, social and health risk factors as measured by” the Maternal Vulnerability Index, “a novel county-level index to quantify maternal vulnerability to ad…

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Second Season Of Nirsevimab For RSV Appeared Safe, Effective In Children With CHD Or CLD Who Were Born Preterm, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (7/26, Tong) reports, “A second season of nirsevimab for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) appeared safe and effective in children with congenital heart disease (CHD) or chronic lung disease (CLD) who were born preterm, according to st…

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Infant Boys May Have Greater Likelihood Of Resisting In Utero Vertical Transmission Of HIV Than Girls Do, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (7/26, Susman) reports, “Infant boys appeared more likely than girls to be able to resist in utero vertical transmission of HIV, even when their mothers had less than optimal antiretroviral therapy, a longitudinal study showed.” MedPage Toda…

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Rotavirus-Associated Hospitalization Linked To Later Autoimmune Disease In Childhood, Study Indicates

MedPage Today (7/26, DeBenedette) reports, “Rotavirus-associated hospitalization was significantly associated with subsequent autoimmune disease during childhood, according to a large population-based cohort study from South Korea.” MedPage Today also say…

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Stillbirth Rate Holds Steady In 2021 After Increase In First Year Of Pandemic, Report Shows

CNN (7/26, McPhillips) reports, “Stillbirths have been trending down for decades in the United States. But the rate ticked up in the first year of the Covid-19 pandemic, and new” CDC data show “a second year of stalled progress.” The report found that “mo…

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Researchers Examine Patterns In Development Of Pediatric Allergies

NBC News (7/25, Sullivan) reports, “Eczema in young babies could be a sign that a child will go on to develop more allergies,” as findings published online in the journal Pediatrics confirm “a phenomenon known as the ‘allergic march,’” that is, “a pattern…

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Antibiotic Treatment Appears To Provide “Minimal Benefit” For Children With Acute Sinusitis, Study Suggests

MedPage Today (7/25, Sullivan) reports, “Antibiotic treatment provided ‘minimal’ benefit for children with acute sinusitis and was accompanied by more cases of clinically significant diarrhea, researchers” concluded in the findings published in JAMA. In t…

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More Than One In Six Toddlers Not Receiving All Doses Of Most Early Childhood Vaccines, Data Indicate

HealthDay (7/25, Mann) reports, “Most early childhood vaccines require three or four doses for best protection, but more than one in six toddlers aren’t getting them all, leaving them vulnerable to potentially deadly infections,” investigators concluded i…

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At Least 20 States Have Enacted Policies Restricting Healthcare For Transgender Youth, Researchers Say

CNN (7/25, McPhillips) reports, “At least 20 states have enacted policies restricting healthcare for transgender youth, and the loss of gender-affirming care clinics in those states has dramatically increased the average travel time to a” clinician, inves…

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Not Enough Evidence To Recommend Primary Care Screening For Speech, Language Problems In Asymptomatic Children Five Years And Younger, USPSTF Concludes

MedPage Today (7/25, Henderson) reports, “The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that there is not enough evidence to make a recommendation on primary care screening for speech and language problems in children five years and younger w…

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Average Cost Of Healthcare Data Breach Hits $11M, Report Indicates

HealthIT Security (7/24, McKeon) says “the average cost of a healthcare data breach” has now reached $11 million, “signifying a $1 million increase from last year, according to IBM Security’s 2023 Cost of a Data Breach Report. The global average cost of a…

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Use Of Hybrid Care Model Effective For Providing Prenatal Care During Pandemic, Research Indicates

mHealth Intelligence (7/24, Melchionna) reports “research indicated that the use of a hybrid care model for providing prenatal care during the COVID-19 pandemic did not alter rates of preeclampsia or eclampsia, maternal morbidity, cesarean delivery, or pr…

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Review Study Supports Efficacy Of Euclid Emerald Orthokeratology Lenses In Slowing Axial Elongation In Children With Myopia

Healio (7/24, Young) reports, “A uniquely extensive body of literature supports the efficacy of Euclid Emerald orthokeratology lenses in slowing axial elongation in children with myopia,” researchers concluded in the findings of a 37-study review publishe…

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Children Who Experience LVO Stroke Have Better Clinical Outcomes When Treated With Thrombectomy Rather Than Medical Management Alone, Study Finds

Aunt Minnie (7/24, Morton) reports, “Children who experience large vessel occlusion (LVO) stroke have better clinical outcomes when treated with thrombectomy rather than medical management alone, according to a…study.” In the “matched case-control study…

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Children Who Read For Pleasure 12 Hours Per Week Perform Better On Cognitive Tests, Have Better Mental Health, Research Suggests

CNBC (7/24, Shrikant) reports, “Kids who read for pleasure 12 hours per week perform better on cognitive tests and have better mental health,” investigators concluded in a study that “analyzed clinical interviews, cognitive tests, mental and behavioral as…

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Excessive TV Watching In Childhood Tied To Higher Risk Of Metabolic Syndrome At Age 45, Research Suggests

HealthDay (7/24, Collins) reports, “Excessive TV watching in childhood leads to a higher risk of metabolic syndrome at age 45,” investigators concluded in a study that “looked at more than 1,000 participants born in 1972 or 1973 in New Zealand” whose “wee…

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Prevalence Of HCV Infections In Pregnant Women Increased 16-Fold Over A 21-Year Period, Study Finds

MedPage Today (7/21, DeBenedette) reported, “The prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections in pregnant women increased 16-fold over a 21-year period, with associated higher risks of adverse perinatal outcomes, according to a cross-sectional study.”…

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FDA Approves Cantharidin For Treatment Of Molluscum Contagiosum

Reuters (7/21, Roy, Mandowara) reported the FDA “has approved Verrica Pharmaceuticals Inc’s treatment of a viral skin infection in adults and children aged 2 years and above, the company said on Friday.” The approval for Ycanth (cantharidin) “makes it the…

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Approximately 11% Of Young Adults In US Regularly Use Electronic Cigarettes, Report Says

The Hill (7/22, Robertson) reports, “More than 1 in 10 Americans ages 18-24 are using e-cigarettes regularly, a study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)…found.” Approximately “4.5 percent of Americans use vapes overall, CDC report…

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Patient, Parental Preferences May Be Strongest Motivating Factors Regarding Decision To Postpone Biologic Therapy Withdrawal In Patients With Clinically Inactive Non-Systemic JIA, Study Indicates

HCPlive (7/21, Pine) reported, “In pediatric patients with clinically inactive non-systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the preferences of the patient and parents were the strongest motivating factor regarding the decision to postpone biologic th…

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Large Proportion Of Rural Children Fed High-Sugar, High-Salt Foods Within First 2 Years Of Life, Study Indicates

Healio (7/23, Weldon) reports, “A large proportion of rural children were fed high-sugar and high-salt foods within the first 2 years of life, according to a study presented at NUTRITION.” Researchers examined “responses to Early Healthy Lifestyles (EHL)…

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More Than 16% Of Pediatric Population Experience At Least One Persistent Symptom Months Following COVID-19, Review Indicates

HealthDay (7/21, Gotkine) reported that “16.2 percent of the pediatric population experience one or more persistent symptoms at least three months after COVID-19, according to a review.” Researchers “conducted a systematic review to examine the prevalence…

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Women Who Receive Care From Midwives During Pregnancy Have Higher Likelihood Of Postpartum Depression Screening, Study Finds

HCPlive (7/20, Grossi) reports, “A…study found women who received care from midwives during pregnancy had a significantly higher likelihood of being screened for postpartum depression compared with those cared for by obstetricians.” The findings were pu…

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Pediatric Patients With ALL In LMICs Likely To Have Lower OS And Disease-Free Survival Rates, Study Says

Hematology Advisor (7/20, Goodman) reports, “Pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) living in low- or middle-income countries (LMICs) are likely to have lower overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival rates than patients living i…

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Hospitalizations, ED Visits For Suicide Attempts, Ideation Appear To Have Risen Nationally Among Children, Teens From 2016 To 2021, Research Suggests

NBC News (7/19, Pandey) reported, “Hospitalizations and emergency” department (ED) “visits for suicide attempts and ideation rose nationally among children and teens from 2016 to 2021,” investigators concluded in a study that “focused on a set of more tha…

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HHS, FTC Warn Telehealth Providers About Risks Of Online Tracking Software

Bloomberg Law (7/20, Lopez, Subscription Publication) reports that HHS and the FTC “are warning telehealth providers and hospitals about the potential for online tracking software integrated into their websites like Google Analytics or Meta Pixel to be us…

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House Committee Advances Bill To Expand Telehealth Access Through Employers

Modern Healthcare (7/20, Berryman, Subscription Publication) reports, “The House Energy and Commerce Committee approved the Telehealth Benefit Expansion for Workers Act of 2023 on a 29-20 vote.” The legislation, “sponsored by Rep. Tim Walberg (R-Mich.), w…

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Parents Alarmed By Trend Of Adolescents Using Social Media To Diagnose Themselves With Mental Health Conditions

CNN (7/20, Kelly) reports, “Social media platforms, including TikTok and Instagram, have come under mounting scrutiny in recent years for their potential to lead younger users to harmful content and exacerbate what experts have called a national mental he…

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Friendship App “Wizz” Used To Extort Young Teens With Sexually Explicit Material, Watchdog Says

NBC News (7/19, Khogeer) reports, “A Tinder-like app popular among teenagers and young adults has allegedly been used to extort users by tricking them into sending sexually explicit photos, a problem that internet safety watchdogs say is indicative of the…

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Researchers Study Airway Disease In Children With Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

Healio (7/19, Hornick) reports, “On chest CTs, children with primary ciliary dyskinesia and inner dynein arm/microtubular disorganization defects had more mucus plugging than other defects, according to” study results. The findings were published in Annal…

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Increased Rate Of T1D, T2D In Pediatric Patients Observed During First Year Of Pandemic Persisted Through 2022, Study Indicates

HCPlive (7/19, Campbell) reports, “An analysis of EHR data recorded from 2018-2022 within Duke University Medical Center-affiliated diabetes care centers suggests the increased rate of new-onset type 1” (T1D) “and type 2 diabetes” (T2D) in pediatric patie…

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COVID-19 mRNA Vaccination During Pregnancy Results In Strong Immune Responses For Mothers, Infants, Study Suggests

Healio (7/19, Welsh) reports, “COVID-19 messenger RNA vaccination during pregnancy resulted in a robust immune response without adverse outcomes for both mothers and infants for almost 6 months after birth, according to a cohort study.” The findings were…

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CMS Intervenes In Some States’ Eligibility Checks Amid Wave Of Medicaid Coverage Cancellations

Bloomberg Law (7/19, Belloni, Subscription Publication) reports, “Biden Administration officials are increasing their monitoring of states’ Medicaid renewal processes to ensure Americans don’t lose health coverage inappropriately.” CMS “has intervened wit…

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Maternal Vaccine Produces Antibodies Against Invasive Group B Streptococcus In Infants, Phase 2 Trial Suggests

MedPage Today (7/19, Hein) reports, “A vaccine given during pregnancy produced antibodies against group B streptococcus that were transferred to infants at IgG thresholds associated with a reduced risk of invasive group B streptococcal disease, a phase 2…

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Single Dose Of 9-Valent HPV Vaccine Maintains Immune Response For Up To Two Years, Study Says

Healio (7/18, Weldon) reports, “One dose of the 9-valent HPV vaccine generated a sustained immune response against two prominent cancer-causing types of the virus for up to 2 years, according study findings.” The results were published in Pediatrics.

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Antibiotic Change During Treatment For PEx Among Children With CF Is Not Associated With Improved Clinical Outcomes, Study Finds

Pulmonology Advisor (7/18, Stong) reports, “Switching intravenous (IV) antibiotics during treatment for pulmonary exacerbations (PEx) among children with cystic fibrosis (CF) is common and is not associated with improved clinical outcomes, according to st…

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Most Transgender Youths Or Children With Central Precocious Puberty Had Sustained Biochemical Response After Using Histrelin Implant For More Than 17 Months, Research Suggests

Healio (7/18, Monostra) reports, “Most transgender youths or children with central precocious puberty had a sustained biochemical response after using a histrelin implant for more than 17 months,” researchers concluded in the findings of a 49-child and ad…

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