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NAPNAP Updates Position Statement on Pediatric Health Care/Medical Home

NAPNAP Updates Position Statement on Pediatric Health Care/Medical Home
Children’s health care should be focused on overall well-being of children and families.

New York, April 29, 2016 – The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) released an updated position statement in the March/April issue of Journal of Pediatric Health Care focusing on children in pediatric health care/medical homes.

According to the statement, the delivery of children’s health care should be “family-centered, accessible, comprehensive, coordinated, culturally appropriate, compassionate, and focused on the overall well-being of children and families.” Additionally, NAPNAP calls for a collaboration among all qualified pediatric health care providers caring for children in pediatric health care/medical homes.

“The model of care in the health care/medical home mirrors the values of pediatric-focused advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) and NAPNAP as an organization,” said NAPNAP President Cathy Haut, DNP, CPNP-AC, CPNP-PC, CCRN. “We focus on and promote holistic care of children and their families.”

Based on research during the development of the statement, children and youth with special health care needs who receive health care within a health care/medical home have better health outcomes than those who do not. Health care/medical homes require a collaborative effort among all qualified pediatric health care providers and pediatric-focused APRNs possess the education, knowledge and skills to successfully lead, coordinate and manage care within health care that focuses on coordination, holistic care and family well-being.

“Because of their experience and ability to offer nearly the entire spectrum of pediatric health-related services, pediatric-focused APRNs are equipped to lead in medical homes,” said Dr. Haut. “It is that special nurse dose that ensures the best outcomes and value.” As a concept, a “nurse dose” leads to improvements in patient mortality, morbidity and healthcare costs. NAPNAP and pediatric-focused APRNs, however, fully believe in interprofessional cooperation and understand that other providers may act as team leads if it’s in the best interest of the patient at a particular time.

The statement cites several studies which demonstrate the outstanding patient outcomes delivered by pediatric-focused APRNs to children with medically complex conditions.

Pediatric-focused APRNs play key roles in health care/medical home intervention, comprehensive care delivery teams and improved parent satisfaction, child health and caregiver strain.

Because of health care systems innovations like telehealth and gaps in access to care and workforces, NAPNAP encourages that all legislation and policies related to the health care/medical home include pediatric-focused APRNs as fully reimbursable providers and participants in demonstration projects, reimbursement strategies and incentive programs.

The entire position statement can be accessed at jpedhc.org.

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The National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners (NAPNAP) is the nation’s only professional association for pediatric-focused advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) dedicated to improving the quality of health care for infants, children, adolescents and young adults. Representing more than 8,500 healthcare practitioners with 17 special interest groups and 49 chapters, NAPNAP has been advocating for children’s health since 1973 and was the first APRN society in the U.S. Our mission is to empower pediatric-focused APRNs and their interprofessional partners to enhance child and family health through leadership, advocacy, professional practice, education and research. www.NAPNAP.org