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NAPNAP Daily News

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With Increasing Popularity Of Trampoline Parks, More Children Are Being Injured.
TODAY (7/25, Kim) reports that with the growing popularity of trampoline parks, more visitors, particularly children, are getting hurt. In fact, “according to the American Academy of Pediatrics, the number of emergency” department “visits from trampoline...
Intravenous Lidocaine May Be Safe And Effective Treatment For Children And Adolescents With Status Migraine, Study Suggests.
Neurology Advisor (7/25) reports researchers found that intravenous lidocaine may be a safe and effective treatment for “children and adolescents with status migraine.” The findings were published in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine.
Adolescents Bearing The Brunt Of The Global AIDS Epidemic, Report Finds.
Reuters (7/25, Kelland) reports that adolescents, especially “girls, are bearing the brunt of the global AIDS epidemic with around 30 adolescents becoming infected with HIV every hour, according to a report by the United Nations children’s fund UNICEF.”...
Completion Of Sepsis Care Protocol Within One Hour May Reduce Risk Of Death In Children, Researchers Say.
HealthDay (7/24, Preidt) reports that completion of “updated New York state sepsis diagnosis protocols” within “one hour” of sepsis recognition may reduce “the risk of death by 40 percent” in youngsters with sepsis. HealthDay adds, “Completion of the gui...
Delaware Bans Conversion Therapy For Minors.
USA Today (7/24, Hafner) reports, “Licensed mental health professionals can no longer practice gay conversion therapy on minors in Delaware after” Gov. John Carney (D) “signed a new law Monday.” Conversion therapy is “discouraged by the American Psychiat...
Few Young Women Are Tested For Sexually Transmitted Infections That Cause PID, Study Suggests.
Newsweek (7/24, Andrew) reports, “Few young women are tested for the sexually transmitted infections that cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID),” research indicated. The study revealed that “across 48 pediatric hospitals and more than 10,000 PID patien...
Dutch Clinical Trial Testing Sildenafil In Pregnant Women Put On Hold Following Deaths Of 11 Babies.
Reuters (7/24, Deutsch) reports a clinical trial in the Netherlands testing sildenafil in pregnant women has been put on hold following the deaths of 11 babies possibly due to a “related lung condition.” The clinical trial began in 2015 at 11 hospitals,...
Gluten-Free Children’s Foods May Not Be Healthier Than Foods With Gluten, Study Suggests.
Reuters (7/23, Rapaport) reports researchers found that many children’s foods “promoted as gluten-free tend to be lacking in nutritional value and loaded with sugar just like other packaged kids’ products on grocery store shelves.” The findings were publ...
Reactions To Food In Kids’ Brains May Cause Them To Overeat, Study Suggests.
The Philadelphia Inquirer (7/23, Bernard) reports a new study by researchers at Pennsylvania State University has “linked overeating to the brain’s response to food rewards” and “may help to shed light on the national epidemic that can lead to type 2 dia...
States Than Have Decriminalized Marijuana Have Seen No Increase In Marijuana Use By Young People, Study Suggests.
HealthDay (7/23, Preidt) reports a study by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests “states that have decriminalized marijuana have had no increase in use of the drug by young people.” Study authors “analyzed marijua...
Radiation From Smartphones May Negatively Affect Teenagers’ Memories, Study Suggests.
Fox News (7/23) report a new study by researchers at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute “suggests that radiation from smartphones is negatively impacting teenagers’ memories, leaving them with short-term memory loss.” Specifically, researcher...
Packaging Chemicals, Food Additives Are Dangerous For Children, AAP Says.
USA Today (7/23, Haller) reports, “Chemicals used in packaging and in processed meats, among others, can lead to obesity, puberty issues and other health problems, said the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP).” As such, “In a policy statement, the AAP.....
Second Screening For Primary Congenital Hypothyroidism In Infants Caught 20% Of Cases That Could Not Have Been Identified By Only One Screening, Study Finds.
MedPage Today (7/20, Walker) reported, “A second screening for primary congenital hypothyroidism in infants, a disorder that can cause permanent cognitive impairment in children, caught 20% of cases that could not have been identified by only one screeni...
Nurse Practitioners Bring More Profit, Productivity To Medical Practices, Study Suggests.
Modern Healthcare (7/20, Kacik, Subscription Publication) reported a Medical Group Management Association analysis found that “medical practices with more advanced practice practitioners, nurse practitioners and other non-physician providers are more pro...
Study Associates Maternal Depression During Pregnancy With Several Adverse Outcomes For The Baby.
MedPage Today (7/20, Monao) reported, “Depression during pregnancy for mothers was tied to several adverse outcomes for the baby,” research indicated. The study revealed that “compared with mothers who did not have depression, those who were diagnosed wi...
Connecticut Re-Launching Campaign To Educate Minority Parents On Dangers Of Lead Poisoning In Kids.
The AP (7/22) reports, “Connecticut is re-launching a campaign to educate minority parents about the dangers of...lead poisoning” in children. The new “campaign, consisting of billboards, advertisements on social media and public service announcements, w...
More US Teenagers Avoiding Drugs And Alcohol, Study Indicates.
Reuters (7/19, Rapaport) reports, “The proportion of high school students in their final year who have never tried alcohol or drugs increased fivefold from 1975 to 2014, and surged nearly as much for younger students between 1991 and 2014,” researchers c...
Heightened Performance Monitoring Evident In Early Childhood Associated With Onset Of OCD During Adolescence, Scan Study Indicates.
Healio (7/19, Demko) reports that “heightened performance monitoring evident in early childhood was associated with the onset of obsessive-compulsive disorder during adolescence and smaller right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex volume,” researchers conc...
Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder Have Reduced Connectivity In Mesolimbic Pathway Linking Brain Areas Critical For Processing Social Reward, Study Indicates.
MedPage Today (7/19) reports, “Advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques showed that children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have reduced connectivity in the mesolimbic pathway that links two brain areas critical for processing social rew...
Many Parents May Underestimate Total Amount Of Sugar In Common Foodstuffs, Study Suggests.
In “Well,” the New York Times (7/19, Reynolds) reports that “a recent study published in the International Journal of Obesity suggests that most” people “are not adept at estimating how much sugar is in some common foodstuffs.” Researchers arrived at thi...
Vaping And Nicotine Patches During Pregnancy May Increase Risk Of SIDS, Study Suggests.
Newsweek (7/19, Gander) reports that pregnant mothers who vape or nicotine patches may increase their infants’ risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), according to a study published in the Journal of Physiology. Newsweek adds, “FDA officials believe...
CT Imaging In Kids Associated With Increased Cancer Risk, Study Suggests.
MedPage Today (7/18, Bankhead) reports that research indicates “pediatric patients who had CT scans had a higher-than-expected risk of developing...cancer later in life.” Investigators found that “the risk for any type of cancer was 47% higher and ranged...
Despite Glycemic Control, Intensive Insulin Management, Women With Type 1 Diabetes Still Having Babies Large For Gestational Age, Study Indicates.
Medscape (7/18, McCall, Subscription Publication) reports, “Despite good glycemic control with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) and intensive insulin management throughout pregnancy, women with type 1 diabetes still had babies who were large for gesta...
Phase 3 Trial Set To Evaluate Neurosteroid Ganaxolone In Rare Form Of Epilepsy.
Rare Disease Report (7/18) reports a pivotal phase 3 trial will evaluate Marinus Pharmaceuticals’ neurosteroid ganaxolone in children and young adults with CDKL5 deficiency disorder (CDD), a rare form of epilepsy “first identified in 2004.” The treatment...
Children May Benefit From Having Working Mothers, Study Suggests.
CNN (7/18, Howard) reports researchers found that “girls raised in homes with working mothers are more likely to grow up to have successful careers,” while “the sons of working mothers spent more time as adults caring for family members.” The findings we...
Frequent Use Of Digital Media By Adolescents May Be Associated With Increased Risk For AD/HD, Study Indicates.
The Wall Street Journal (7/17, Hernandez, Morris, Subscription Publication) reports that frequent use of digital media by adolescents may be associated with an increased risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), researchers concluded aft...
Children With Autism May Have Abnormalities In Brain Region That Makes Social Interactions Enjoyable, Study Suggests.
HealthDay (7/17, Norton) reports researchers found using MRI brain scans that “children with autism show abnormalities in” the mesolimbic reward pathway, “a deep brain circuit that typically makes socializing enjoyable.” Included in the study were “24 ch...
Less Than Half Of School Districts Test Water For Lead, Report Says.
The AP (7/17) provides coverage of a new Government Accountability Office report and survey of 549 school districts across the country finding that only 41% of school districts test their water for lead. Of those, 37% found “elevated levels of the toxin....
A Good Night’s Sleep May Be Critical For Teens’ Metabolic Health, Researchers Say.
The New York Times (7/17, Bakalar) reports, “A good night’s sleep may be critical for the metabolic health of teenagers,” researchers concluded in a study involving “829 boys and girls, average age 13.” The study revealed that “shorter sleep duration and...
Severe Allergic Reaction To Food Less Serious In Infants Than In Toddlers, Older Children, Study Indicates.
HealthDay (7/17, Preidt) reports that research indicates “a severe allergic reaction to food is much less serious in infants than in toddlers and older children.” The findings were published online in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.
Opioids Frequently Prescribed For Children, Study Indicates.
Newsweek (7/16, Andrew) reports “one in 10 children enrolled in Tennessee’s Medicaid program were prescribed opioids between 1999 and 2014, concurrent with the onset of the opioid crisis,” according to a new study published in the journal Pediatrics. Ove...
Schumer Asks CDC To Investigate Increase In Child Drowning Rates.
CQ Roll Call (DC) (7/16, Lesniewski) reports Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, in a letter to CDC Director Robert Redfield, asked that the agency, in CQ Roll Call’s words, “look into the rates of drowning, including why young boys seem nearly twice...
Elevated Glycated Hemoglobin Levels At Or Around Time Of Conception Increase Risk Of Major Cardiac Defects In Infants Born To Mothers With T1D, Research Indicates.
Medscape (7/16, Harrison, Subscription Publication) reports that research indicates “elevated glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels at or around the time of conception significantly increase the risk of major cardiac defects in infants born to mothers with...
Not All Adults Convinced Nicotine Harmful To Children, Study Indicates.
Reuters (7/16, Rapaport) reports that although “most adults know nicotine is bad for children, smokers and some other individuals aren’t convinced of this fact, according to” research published online in Pediatrics. Researchers found that “overall, 83 pe...
Link Between Self-Regulation And Childhood Obesity May Impact Boys And Girls Differently, Research Suggests.
MedPage Today (7/16, Monaco) reports that research suggests “the association between self-regulation and childhood obesity may affect boys and girls differently.” Researchers found “in a large cohort of 6,400 children, boys tended to have lower self-regu...
Incidence Of Adverse Events In Hospitalized Pediatric Patients Showed No Decline From 2007 To 2012, Study Indicates.
MedPage Today (7/15, Walker) reported, “Incidence of adverse events in hospitalized pediatric patients showed no decline from 2007 to 2012,” researchers found. The findings were published in Pediatrics.
America’s Complicated History Of Infant Feeding Examined.
In a 1,300-word piece, the New York Times (7/14, Caron) charted “America’s complicated history of infant feeding, starting with the spread of formula.” Back in 1929, “the American Medical Association formed the Committee on Foods to approve formula safet...
Many Young US Children Not Screened For Development Delays, Researchers Say.
HealthDay (7/13, Preidt) reported, “Overall, fewer than one-third of U.S. children under three years old receive recommended screening for developmental problems,” researchers found after analyzing “2016 data.” The study revealed that “only 30 percent of...
California Officials Warn Of Spike In Marijuana-Related Health Scares Among Kids, Teens.
The Los Angeles Times (7/13, McGreevy) reported that California state and local officials said “they are alarmed by a spike in calls they have received to report children and teenagers ingesting marijuana products since,” the state “legalized cannabis fo...
About Half Of All Parents Use Their Cellphone While Driving With Their Child In The Car, Study Finds.
Bloomberg News (7/12, Griffin) reports, “Half of all parents use their cellphones while driving with young children in the car, according to a study released Thursday by the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of...
More Than A Third Of Youth With PTSD Received No Treatment In 2012, Researchers Say.
Healio (7/12, Demko) reports, “Of more than 7,700 youths with a new episode of” post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) “in 2012, about 60% received psychotherapy, about 6% received pharmacotherapy and more than one-third received neither therapy nor medic...
Boys With Autism May Have Flatter Surface On Right Side Of Cerebellum, Study Suggests.
HealthDay (7/12, Preidt) reports researchers found “that boys with autism had a significantly flatter surface on the right side of their cerebellum,” and “that a flatter cerebellum was associated with differences in thinking abilities and communication,...
Fenfluramine Reduces Convulsive Seizures In Patients With Dravet Syndrome In Phase 3 Trial.
Reuters (7/12, Mishra) reports that in a clinical trial, Zogenix’s “low-dose, liquid solution of fenfluramine” succeeded in reducing convulsive seizures among patients with Dravet syndrome, “a rare form of childhood epilepsy.” The article mentions that f...
Behavior Of Peers, Parents May Have Led To Decline In Childhood Smoking, Study Indicates.
Reuters (7/11, Weinstock) reports a study found that “two consecutive generations of children in the UK had dramatically different rates of smoking at an early age, and one major reason may be the changing socioeconomic status and behaviors of their pare...
DHS Establishing Office To Work With Central American Governments On Reunification Of Immigrant Families.
The Washington Examiner (7/11, Giaritelli) reports the Department of Homeland Security is establishing “an office that will work with Central American governments to inform them of reunification efforts for families that were separated at the border unde...
ORR System For Tracking Separated Immigrant Children Reportedly Fraught With Tech Issues.
Reuters (7/11, Levinson) reports, “From the moment it went online in January of 2014, the computer system designed to track unaccompanied immigrant children and process their release has created headaches for the shelter staff, government employees and o...
HIV-Positive Children In South Africa More Likely To Have Cognitive, Physical Delays Than HIV-Negative Youngsters, Study Suggests.
Newsweek (7/11, Interrante) reports that “HIV-positive children in South Africa” may be “more likely to have cognitive and physical delays than HIV-negative children,” researchers concluded. In findings published in PLOS One, investigators found that “HI...
Teens Who Use Social Network Sites For More Than Two Hours Daily May Be At Increased Risk For Cyberbullying, Study Indicates.
HealthDay (7/10, Preidt) reports investigators “surveyed more than 12,000 teens in Germany, Poland and Romania and found those who used social network sites for more than two hours a day were at increased risk for cyberbullying.” The findings were publis...
During Extreme Heat, College Kids Living In Unair-Conditioned Dorms Performed Worse On Tests Of Mental Skills, Study Finds.
The Boston Globe (7/10, Finucane) reports, “Harvard researchers say that they studied students in dorms with and without air conditioning and during a heat wave.” HealthDay (7/10, Reinberg) reports that “in the face of extreme heat, college students livi...
Fewer Than One Third Of Young Children Receive A Recommended Parent-Completed Developmental Screening, Researchers Say.
Medscape (7/10, MacReady, Subscription Publication) reports, “Fewer than one third of young children receive a recommended parent-completed developmental screening, and the rate of developmental surveillance during healthcare visits is ‘not substantially...

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